Jump to content

  •  

Photo
- - - - -

Canning home made salsa


  • Please log in to reply
43 replies to this topic

#21 Justaguy

Justaguy

    On Fire!

  • Extreme
  • 5,439 posts
  • aka:JAG and Knepper's Peppers
  • Location:Harrisburg, Pa

Posted 25 September 2010 - 12:24 PM

So if I get the hot sauce boiling, can I pour it in the jars I boiled and lid them? Or the bath I do now is definitely needed? Just curious.
www.KneppersPeppers.com Hot Sauce
Taste the Flavor, Feel the Heat


#22 jjs7741

jjs7741

    Smokin' Hot

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,331 posts
  • Location:Greenville, SC

Posted 25 September 2010 - 12:54 PM

The bath is needed to seal the jars as well as kill any bacteria and molds that are in the salsa. Even after boiling the jars and the salsa, I never presume to get all especially since after boiling them both, they are exposed to the air which could introduce new nasties to the food to multiply in the jar and spoil as it sits on a shelf.

jacob

#23 POTAWIE

POTAWIE

    On Fire!

  • New Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,912 posts
  • Location:Potawie-land near Ottawa Canada
  • (x2)

Posted 25 September 2010 - 01:16 PM

So if I get the hot sauce boiling, can I pour it in the jars I boiled and lid them? Or the bath I do now is definitely needed? Just curious.


For sauces you just need to hot-pack the sauce into sterilized jars/bottles. No need for a water bath or pressure canner
Check out my pepper pics and more on Flickr
http://www.flickr.com/photos/potawie

#24 RS67Man

RS67Man

    Heating Up

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 498 posts
  • Location:Spanaway WA

Posted 25 September 2010 - 01:41 PM

I have made and canned the salsa, I think it turned out good. 12 pints plus about two quarts I did not can. The salsa that was not canned tastes good, a bit heavy on the lemon juice but good. I used about a dozen jalapeņos, a dozen Habaneros, two peach Habaneros, two Douglahs, two yellow scorpions, and a couple others I forget the name of right now. It has a bit of heat, about a commercially made hot rank, if not a bit more. It will make a great chip dipping salsa when watching TV.

I also have more canning projects on deck. So far what is planned is green tomato relish, strawberry jam, peach and pineapple jam, pickled pepper rings made with Jalapeņos and hot wax peppers from the garden, and to can the vegetables I have yet to harvest too.
When a madman gets a gun he's gonna point it at someone. Whether it's up in Texas tower, or over there, across the pond.
And if you step on his pride, or if he hurts somewhere inside. He might let one fly, when his nerves are gone.

#25 Silver_Surfer

Silver_Surfer

    Smokin' Hot

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4,072 posts
  • Location:Heart of Dixie

Posted 25 September 2010 - 04:25 PM

Sounds like some tasty salsa. That lemon tang will mellow quite a bit after the salsa has sat for a couple of weeks in the jars. Overall flavor will improve too as the ingredients meld. :)
"Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not." Thomas Jefferson
Guns have only two enemies; rust and politicians.
The Second Amendment is in place in case the politicians ignore the others.

#26 DaQatz

DaQatz

    Hot

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 541 posts
  • Location:Maine

Posted 18 October 2010 - 10:55 PM

I make and can salsa every year this season I did about 80 jars or so. I always just hot water bath them. We still have jars from as far back 2002 which are still good, though do seem hotter then when we first made them though.
Peppers taste the flamebow.

#27 salsalady

salsalady

    On Fire!

  • Extreme Biz
  • 9,101 posts
  • aka:SL, HSL
  • Location:eastern WA, USA... the dry side of the state
  • (x6)

Posted 18 October 2010 - 11:14 PM

daQ~ that is an impressive salsa quota! And I agree that they do get hotter as they sit. Never figured that one out, but I have a theory~

And WELCOME!
SL

Texas Creek Products

The Chile Addict's prayer-"Lord, grant me the wisdom to know it will be too hot, the courage to eat it anyway, and the serenity to accept the pain that follows. Amen"

 

PepperPeopleRock!


#28 DaQatz

DaQatz

    Hot

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 541 posts
  • Location:Maine

Posted 18 October 2010 - 11:25 PM

Aye was in the middle of a 100 jar batch when a frost hit ,and a family member had sudden health problems. Had to turn the tomatoes I'd already prepared into soup ,and the peppers I cut are fermenting. So would have had a lot more this season if things had gone as planned.
Peppers taste the flamebow.

#29 salsalady

salsalady

    On Fire!

  • Extreme Biz
  • 9,101 posts
  • aka:SL, HSL
  • Location:eastern WA, USA... the dry side of the state
  • (x6)

Posted 18 October 2010 - 11:42 PM

hopefully you salvaged the lot, freeze it as a quick solution, and then process it later as you have time. Best wishes to the family~

Texas Creek Products

The Chile Addict's prayer-"Lord, grant me the wisdom to know it will be too hot, the courage to eat it anyway, and the serenity to accept the pain that follows. Amen"

 

PepperPeopleRock!


#30 Masala Mojo

Masala Mojo

    On Fire!

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,632 posts
  • Location:Crafting Curries.

Posted 19 October 2010 - 11:55 AM

I always prepare fresh salsa and use it off. A 2 lb bottle lasts for about ten days.
"Truth wears see through clothes.It is the lie that is covered." says MasalaMojo .O God ! Give me Chillies or give me death. MA-MO's prayer

#31 megamoo

megamoo

    Smokin' Hot

  • Extreme
  • 2,505 posts
  • Location:Perth Western Australia
  • (x1)

Posted 17 November 2010 - 01:16 AM

I've never canned or pickled but I just bought a canning set (the tongs and funnel etc..) and some jars, and I have a bunch of plants growing away. I was planning on doing a few pickle jars with a mix of whole and chopped up chilies to give as presents to family n friends.

So... in danger of re-hashing everything that has been said already, would it be alright to sterilise the jars and equipment and then stuff the jars and pour in the boiled water/vinegar mix and then seal them? Do I need to water bath them at all? I have a pressure cooker but have barely used it and don't have the rack that goes in it to keep the jars off the bottom.

As they are gifts I can't be sure of how long they will sit before being openned. Do you have to pH test the jars or water/vinegar mix before you seal them?

There are a lot of different ideas in this thread so I want to make sure because its a first time thing for me. Thanks everyone.

There can be no happiness if the things we believe in are different from the things we do - Freya Stark
Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm. - W. Churchill

Mooglog  http://thehotpepper....oglog-20132014/


#32 DaQatz

DaQatz

    Hot

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 541 posts
  • Location:Maine

Posted 17 November 2010 - 01:41 AM

If the ph is low enough the hot water bath isn't "needed" but it's still a very good a idea. For one thing just pouring in hot liquid is a hit or miss way to get a mason jar to seal. Second the water bath also acts a secondary form of sterilization.
The third major affect it has is it causes the water to vaporize and expand, which pushes the oxygen out of the jar. If you can help it you want the oxygen in the jar below 2%. Though there is no real way to measure this in a home environment.

You also don't need to ph test. Vinegars ph normally varies between 2.4(At 5% acidity) to 3(2% acidity) So you can calculate the ph change 1 oz of vinegar(2%) added to 1 gallon of water will lower the ph by 0.9. So a solution
25% vinegar or better as most pickles are is well into the safe range which is basically anything below 4.6.

If you water bath you do want something to keep the jars off the bottom of the pot. They have good chance of cracking or exploding do to near direct contact with the heat. If you don't have a rack I suggest putting silverware in the bottom of
the pot. The jars won't stand straight up, but they won't have direct contact with the heat.
Peppers taste the flamebow.

#33 salsalady

salsalady

    On Fire!

  • Extreme Biz
  • 9,101 posts
  • aka:SL, HSL
  • Location:eastern WA, USA... the dry side of the state
  • (x6)

Posted 17 November 2010 - 08:16 AM

wire rack-
you can also use a wire cake cooling rack in the bottom of the canner. I have a small round wire rack that fits perfectly in a small stock pot for small batches of boiling water baths.

I've also used 2-3 rectangle wire racks, criss-crossed in the bottom of a larger kettle for big batches of boiling water baths. Either one of those options would work for a pressure canner also.

If using a rectangle rack, place open jars filled with water in the spots where the rack doesn't cover the bottom of the pan to keep the other jars in place on the wire rack.

Texas Creek Products

The Chile Addict's prayer-"Lord, grant me the wisdom to know it will be too hot, the courage to eat it anyway, and the serenity to accept the pain that follows. Amen"

 

PepperPeopleRock!


#34 megamoo

megamoo

    Smokin' Hot

  • Extreme
  • 2,505 posts
  • Location:Perth Western Australia
  • (x1)

Posted 17 November 2010 - 08:56 AM

Ok good information, thanks for the answers. I will work on getting the vinegar mix right and visit my mum and dig around in her cupboards, she will have wire racks aplenty!

I just read about using citric acid to lower the pH. Is that used as an alternative because it doesn't alter the flavour as much as vinegar?

There can be no happiness if the things we believe in are different from the things we do - Freya Stark
Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm. - W. Churchill

Mooglog  http://thehotpepper....oglog-20132014/


#35 Edgie

Edgie

    Hot

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 616 posts
  • Location:Ocala, Fl

Posted 01 November 2011 - 03:26 PM

Hi all,

I know this is an old thread, but can I use my regular pressure cooker to can? Thank you.

Regards,
Edward

#36 muskymojo

muskymojo

    Smokin' Hot

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2,331 posts
  • Location:Minneapolis,MN
  • (x1)

Posted 02 November 2011 - 02:04 AM

Yep. Any decent sized pot will work as well for salsa. Don't even need a pressure cooker.
...< `)]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]//{.....< `)]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]//{{.....< `)]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]//{{

#37 PIC 1

PIC 1

    On Fire!

  • Extreme
  • 5,378 posts

Posted 03 November 2011 - 07:33 PM

I "Water-Bath" all my "high acid" type recipes, pickles, green and red tomatoes, red salsa and salsa verde, I pressure can all "low acid" foods which include certain home made soups and my pints of "southwest salsa", which uses beans, corn, and celery, you need to get the temp up to 240 degrees and run with it up to 45 to 60 minutes, depending on the recipe...its a pain in the arse, and takes along time....but if you REALLY like your recipe, then its worth all the effort...

Greg

#38 pepperfever

pepperfever

    Smokin' Hot

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2,213 posts
  • Location:Minnesota, USA

Posted 05 November 2011 - 10:24 AM

There are 2 types of canners ( not cookers) water bath and pressure canners. IF you use a water bath canner for salsa you MUST have at least 1 cup of acid; i.e. vinegar, lemon or lime juice to have it safe to can by that method. The preferred way is pressure canning. The problem is the amount of low acid ingredients in the salsa. I have water-bathed my salsa but have a weight for my pressure canner now so I can go back to using that. All canned produce must be processed to be safe according to the home canning expertts and Ball Blue Book. Older methods once used are no longer considered safe. Maybe they are over cautious BUT I will go with their recommendations rather than risk botulism. Just putting hot contents in a sterilized jar is NOT enough any more. The filled jars must be processed either in a water bath or pressure canner. All low acid foods should be processed in pressure canners.
" I have not failed. I have found 10,000 ways that do not work." Thomas Edison

#39 pepperfever

pepperfever

    Smokin' Hot

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2,213 posts
  • Location:Minnesota, USA

Posted 05 November 2011 - 10:24 AM

There are 2 types of canners ( not cookers) water bath and pressure canners. IF you use a water bath canner for salsa you MUST have at least 1 cup of acid; i.e. vinegar, lemon or lime juice to have it safe to can by that method. The preferred way is pressure canning. The problem is the amount of low acid ingredients in the salsa. I have water-bathed my salsa but have a weight for my pressure canner now so I can go back to using that. All canned produce must be processed to be safe according to the home canning experts and Ball Blue Book. Older methods once used are no longer considered safe. Maybe they are over cautious BUT I will go with their recommendations rather than risk botulism. Just putting hot contents in a sterilized jar is NOT enough any more. The filled jars must be processed either in a water bath or pressure canner. All low acid foods should be processed in pressure canners.

Edited by pepperfever, 05 November 2011 - 10:25 AM.

" I have not failed. I have found 10,000 ways that do not work." Thomas Edison

#40 salsalady

salsalady

    On Fire!

  • Extreme Biz
  • 9,101 posts
  • aka:SL, HSL
  • Location:eastern WA, USA... the dry side of the state
  • (x6)

Posted 05 November 2011 - 10:35 AM

here are some APPROVED recipes for salsa canning. It is suggested that you not change the amount of acids (vinegar, lemon juice) unless you would add MORE, and also not change the amount of low-acid items like onion and garlic. You can easily add habaneros instead of jalapenos for more heat, things like that.

http://cru.cahe.wsu....395/PNW0395.pdf

the salsa pages from Ball recipes. Tons of other recipes on the Ball site.
http://www.freshpres...s.aspx?keyword=

Texas Creek Products

The Chile Addict's prayer-"Lord, grant me the wisdom to know it will be too hot, the courage to eat it anyway, and the serenity to accept the pain that follows. Amen"

 

PepperPeopleRock!





2 user(s) are reading this topic

1 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users