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Durian addiction, so trying to grow one?


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#1 Exavier

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 09:35 AM

I'm thinking of buying a durian tree as I like eating just alittle of the fruit. Any one know much about how easy they are ?

#2 thaichillihead

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 09:47 AM

Thailand is one of the few countries that can grow and fruit durian successfully. So you have the right climate. They are not easy to grow in Florida since it's not tropical enough. A nursery grower here told me they are sensitive to pH. You might want to ask one of the growers in Thailand for more specifics.

#3 Burning Colon

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 10:30 AM

aren't they suppose to be one of the stinkiest foods on the planet? i have seen some youtube videos.

i see the fruit, frozen in the grocery store all the time and am tempted to buy 1 just to see how smelly it is.

good luck finding your tree.

Edited by Burning Colon, 01 June 2011 - 11:58 AM.

Mark
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#4 naganumbness

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 10:58 AM

they grow well out there. it probably takes a few years for the trees to produce. tastes like onions to me.LOL.

#5 Avon Barksdale

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 01:52 PM

I think Andrew Zimmern from the travel channel said they taste like rotten onions. :eek: If he thinks something is nasty, it must really be. :lol:

I'll try anything twice though. :D I doubt I'll be coming across them here anytime soon though.
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#6 Exavier

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 02:13 PM

Its like Jack fruit, but when the spiked fruit falls you don't want to be close. I can buy a tree old enough to fruit as they are so common here. That reminds me, the only reason I'll not grow jack fruit here is the family has about 5 trees so we are giving more jack fruit then we can eat. Back to Durian. There are different kinds, The most common here is sweeter and less stinky though not hard to find the more stinky one as well. There are a few types so I'll pick the less stinky kind. I'm weird as I don't love eating them or hate them. So the you'll love them or hate them is not really true. To me they are fun to eat some times but alot of money here and Thailand is maybe the cheapest place to buy them. As 5 USD$ will get me more then I can eat (I can't eat much or I'll be sick) But I've heard the price some places for same is 30 USD $.. Don't think of farming them as you'll never make any real money..... I must say though the more I try the more I want. Weird as they really don't taste great to me. :crazy: ? Some say they smell like, ? and ? death, ? an so on, I've found they can smell different so maybe not great to lump them to one smell other then they don't really smell good.

#7 Exavier

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 02:18 PM

What has also got me interested is that so many animals are drawn to the smell of the flowers and the fruit. Hope it can help draw some bats our dragon fruit for polinating.

#8 Avon Barksdale

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 05:12 PM

Its like Jack fruit, but when the spiked fruit falls you don't want to be close.


That was another thing they mentioned on the show, they said a lot of people are killed every year by the falling fruit. :eek:
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#9 The Hot Pepper

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 05:18 PM

Some cheeses smell really funky, but taste good... and you, for some reason, accept the smell because it's cheese. I think because this is fruit it turns people off. I'd try it.

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#10 kiddc

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 03:43 AM

i love durians, especially the new strain, Cat Mountain King (pardon the translation).

I remember it takes 3-4 years to fruit from translant and one tree gives up 200-600 fruits per season depending on strain.
visit my grow log :http://thehotpepper.com/topic/37536-kidds-2013-glog-germ-method-added-compost-tea-method-added/

#11 siling_labuyo

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 04:02 AM

not a fan of fresh durian but the candied form is awesome! it can grow into a large tree and takes several years to fruit just like kiddc stated.

#12 Exavier

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Posted 13 June 2011 - 01:13 AM

Just had one that did taste like rotton onions so not going to get that type. Think one of my seedling of Boabo is dead so I've got a new place to plant. Plus All the chilies I've planted in the grown did not do well if they are still alive so will be putting them back in pots. So will have new place for new plants.

#13 markt_10350

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 03:09 AM

From what I know, durian grows well in slope terrain.

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Edited by markt_10350, 28 June 2011 - 03:23 AM.


#14 markt_10350

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 03:10 AM

Its durian season in Malaysia now. Penang where I am from is famous for their durians. Some love and can't wait for more (like me) and other don't even want to be anywhere near it. To share how famous it is recently one of the biggest casino tycoon in Macau Billionare Stanley Ho flown his private jet to Singapore to buy 88 (Malaysian grown durian) called Musang King for USD 1600. Malaysian durian are harvest when they naturally dropped from the tree. The impact from hitting the ground plus letting it fully ripe on the tree provides a fuller flavor. Top quality durians need to be eaten within the day. That may explain why Mr Stanly ho need to fly his private jet 4 hrs to Singapore to collect them. hehe

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#15 SeeYouJimmy

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 03:32 AM

A while ago curiosity got the better of me and I bought a durian from the supermarket (imported frozen and defrosted before sale). I'd also describe it as like eating rotten onions, truly horrid. If I ever got a chance to eat a freshly dropped one I'd give it another go (have previously read elsewhere they should be eaten within a day) but will never try another one bought here. I took it into work and a couple of the guys didn't seem to mind the flavour but hey, each to their own.

aren't they suppose to be one of the stinkiest foods on the planet? i have seen some youtube videos.

i see the fruit, frozen in the grocery store all the time and am tempted to buy 1 just to see how smelly it is.

good luck finding your tree.


If you do try one make sure you cut it open outdoors, the lunchroom at work was a smelling a bit funky for a while....

#16 Exavier

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 05:24 PM

Yes slowly learning more about them. Ok the Durian tree I got is called Mon-tong and is a well known here. Mon-tong for the most part taste like rotten onions with not that strong of a smell. Cha-nee is another one I've tryed here, it tastes a little like rotten meat but not quite. Plus has a stronger smell.

Not sure if getting the Durian tree was a good thing as with Rubber tree, Dragon fruit, Wax apple, Teak, Pomello, Star fruit, Avocado, Guava, Grape fruit, Navel orange, Mangosteen, Gum arabic, Tea, Cocoa, Pappaya, Cashew, Neem, Camphor, Bay leaf, Gingko. I'm getting may not want to drag it around as I'm placing them all in the best places for growing.

Got the Vanilla vines coming along better. One Tea plant died but the other is slowly getting in the better place close to Vanilla and doing better. All the coffee Plants are doing great now. But both my Cocoa are not good so will try and buy 2 more, If the one I broke the tap root comes back I'll have at lest one Great Cocoa tree. The other was broke by the movers and cut wrong, so lots of work to done. My Balsa trees slugs are getting the leaves. One very nice black Mulberry tree doing great, 3 others to work on. One of the new Lychee trees is doing good the others still waiting to see how the repoting will go. So slowly things are getting moved around to learn what needs to be where. One grape vine now in the right spot, plus one Passion fruit vine close needs alot of work done needing things to grow on across the house.

#17 markt_10350

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 04:06 AM

I am interested in growing Avocado plant. Not easy to find those that grow well in our weather.

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#18 Jack Kerouac

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Posted 20 August 2011 - 12:11 AM

My wife and I study ethnobotany. I think her best description of the smell of durian was "butt meat". I hope that doesn't dissuade you from growing this rare and unique ethonobotanical.
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#19 Exavier

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Posted 26 August 2011 - 04:23 AM

The Durian on the letf the right is Cinnamon cassia
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#20 indoChilli

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 02:26 AM

I'm always wondering why western culture dislike durian, once you tried it you'll get hooked, full of taste and texture, the smell is sweet (for me), many variety here (15) and foreign variety also (15). Durian germinate well from seed, but here we buy seedling (about $5-$7 each), it took them 3-6 year to fruit, so patient is the key. If i given the choice between monthong and chane, i prefer chane, more alcohol content inside.
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