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The Comprehensive Guide to Over-Wintering


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#301 ScottsBonnet

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Posted 06 October 2016 - 03:53 PM

I had been delaying the over-wintering, when my Scotch Bonnets picked up again.  Not sure why, as it's been cold and rainy; however, the pods are growing and ripening, so I am leaving them outdoors (in pots).

 

Meanwhile, I placed four other pots in the garage, doors open and facing south.  I have watered them a few times, but they are barely hanging on.  This is where it gets kind of weird - I took the best of the two shishitos (both looked bad) and brought it indoors, placing it in front of a frosty south-facing window.  It began producing blooms and now has a nice pod.  So I brought the other one in and placed it next to it.  Nothing special yet, but it looks like I'll be eating winter peppers.  If not for the suggestions in this thread, I would have tossed these plants a while back.

 

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#302 solid7

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Posted 12 November 2016 - 10:31 PM

I have a quick question for overwintering a very large specimen...

 

Normally, overwintering is no problem.  We don't really have winter, but when I know that the weather is going to get chilly enough to pose a minor threat, I know that it's going to shut down pod production, anyway.  So I'll sometimes chop some back, leaving enough foliage to pick right back up when the weather is improved.  However, I have a monster that is going into its third season, and I'm going to give it the overwinter treatment.  Not just to overwinter it, per se - but also because I need to refresh the media that it's planted in.

 

That's where the problem lies for me...  The main stem is over 2" thick.  I won't be able to leave any leaves when I trim.  So can I trim it back to just a woody main stem?  I plan on putting it in a 10 gallon pot, until it bounces back, and then transplanting it into a 65 gallon pot next season.  And I've not trimmed back to naked stem before, and I really don't want to lose this plant.


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#303 Pepper-Guru

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Posted 20 November 2016 - 11:08 PM

I have a quick question for overwintering a very large specimen...

 

Normally, overwintering is no problem.  We don't really have winter, but when I know that the weather is going to get chilly enough to pose a minor threat, I know that it's going to shut down pod production, anyway.  So I'll sometimes chop some back, leaving enough foliage to pick right back up when the weather is improved.  However, I have a monster that is going into its third season, and I'm going to give it the overwinter treatment.  Not just to overwinter it, per se - but also because I need to refresh the media that it's planted in.

 

That's where the problem lies for me...  The main stem is over 2" thick.  I won't be able to leave any leaves when I trim.  So can I trim it back to just a woody main stem?  I plan on putting it in a 10 gallon pot, until it bounces back, and then transplanting it into a 65 gallon pot next season.  And I've not trimmed back to naked stem before, and I really don't want to lose this plant.

No, generally you don't want to trim completely back to stem unless you see plenty of new nodes forming from said stems. You certainly don't want to trim to "woody" stems. You want a lot of green because thats where new branches will form. 


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#304 solid7

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Posted 21 November 2016 - 06:59 AM

No, generally you don't want to trim completely back to stem unless you see plenty of new nodes forming from said stems. You certainly don't want to trim to "woody" stems. You want a lot of green because thats where new branches will form. 

 

I sorta misrepresented my intent there.  I'm not cutting back to a straight stick.  I'll be cutting off at "Y" nodes.  It's just that there won't be any leaves at all.  Absolutely none.

 

I hadn't heard back on this topic, so I was poking around, and came across some of the bonchi guides. Apparently, the bonchi crowd does this all the time.   I see the guides, and their examples are all showing naked stems, which eventually form small new leaf buds.  So I guess I'm OK...

 


Edited by solid7, 21 November 2016 - 07:01 AM.

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#305 Thegreenchilemonster

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Posted 21 November 2016 - 01:00 PM

I cut my OW plants back to the stump only, with no leaves left. They always grow back just fine.

#306 Malarky

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Posted 23 November 2016 - 09:47 AM

My OW experiment. 2 BahaGoats, 1 Red Savina, 1 Choc Hab.

growing medium is 60%granite grit, 40% napa floor dry, fertilizing weakly with FoliagePro 9-3-6

South facing window. things are going good so far. they're definitely not dying  :party:

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#307 Pepper-Guru

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Posted 24 November 2016 - 02:23 PM

I sorta misrepresented my intent there.  I'm not cutting back to a straight stick.  I'll be cutting off at "Y" nodes.  It's just that there won't be any leaves at all.  Absolutely none.
 
I hadn't heard back on this topic, so I was poking around, and came across some of the bonchi guides. Apparently, the bonchi crowd does this all the time.   I see the guides, and their examples are all showing naked stems, which eventually form small new leaf buds.  So I guess I'm OK...

  

I cut my OW plants back to the stump only, with no leaves left. They always grow back just fine.

  

My OW experiment. 2 BahaGoats, 1 Red Savina, 1 Choc Hab.
growing medium is 60%granite grit, 40% napa floor dry, fertilizing weakly with FoliagePro 9-3-6
South facing window. things are going good so far. they're definitely not dying  :party:
WrvoqX8.jpg?1



I'm not saying it won't grow after being pruned of all leaves, I do it quite often, but I know how much root to prune as well. I also don't think the chances of a plant coming back from being pruned to straight, brown, bark-y stems is very high either. It's a delicate balance and there are way too many variables to say for sure whether one grower would get the same results as the next. Amount of pruned foliage vs roots, amount of pre growth nodules on stems, light intensity, temperature, watering; all things that if not addressed, can lead to those stems just dying eventually. I tend to prune a little more aggressively than I ever did when I started bronchi/overwintering.
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