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#21 OROZCONLECHE

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Posted 16 February 2012 - 07:03 PM

You know what I will do that, maybe ill start slow, and Just out of the Blue....Does stressing out Tomato Plants have any effect on the Tomatoes?
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#22 stc3248

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 06:26 AM

You know what I will do that, maybe ill start slow, and Just out of the Blue....Does stressing out Tomato Plants have any effect on the Tomatoes?

Yup, they turn into Bell Peppers. :rofl:

Yeah, conditions play a role on all fruits. So fruit size and flavor would change depending on conditions, and production would slow down or stop. Stressing tomatoes makes them smaller and less tasty...I know because I have a plant that is still producing from last year, and the tomatoes suck right now. I am not going to keep the plant, but since it hasn't died I just let it keep kickin.

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#23 synclinorium

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 09:21 AM

Unless you have extensive experience caring for peppers, you're probably going to stress out the peppers at some point whether you want to or not... so, I wouldn't worry about it. I find you're better off focusing on keeping the plants happy. Besides, stressing them out too much may have the opposite effect: http://news.sciencem...-wa.html?ref=hp

#24 orangehero

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 11:24 AM

I believe higher altitude (lower temperature?) and higher humidity are factors responsible for increased capsaicin production as one of it's functions is to protect the seeds from fungus.

Edited by orangehero, 17 February 2012 - 11:26 AM.


#25 Capsicum

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 12:36 PM

Letting them get dry before watering is a natural way to stress a plant. I have grown jalapenos and the ones that got more water did not taste hot at all. Not all peppers are like this. Jalapenos are not hot but when you eat a few at a time..... :mouthonfire: :snooty:

#26 POTAWIE

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 12:53 PM

Jalapenos are not hot? Maybe not macho hot but real jalapenos certainly should have some good heat whether you stress them or not.
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#27 OROZCONLECHE

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 04:14 PM

Im assuming some BIG Habañeros I got at the super market were all watered down and pampered because they werent hot and they wre almost clear on color, maybe they took too much care of them
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#28 shigshwa

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 04:30 PM

Im assuming some BIG Habañeros I got at the super market were all watered down and pampered because they werent hot and they wre almost clear on color, maybe they took too much care of them


Just have to point out, there is no ñ in Habanero...

But from what I've heard, yes, watering them too often produces bitter and less spicy chiles.

#29 OROZCONLECHE

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 05:03 PM

Ha ok and Yea i guess i should go for the more darker colors and not so big ones next time
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#30 willard3

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 07:19 PM

You don't even know what you have yet, how do you know you want them more picxante?
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#31 Capsicum

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 08:39 PM

Jalapenos are not hot? Maybe not macho hot but real jalapenos certainly should have some good heat whether you stress them or not.


At 8,000 max scoville a Jalapeno is not very hot at all. Not like I cayenne at a max of 50,000 scoville. Jalapeno peppers have high level of vit. C but not heat. I think people may differ but I may have built my tolerance up from drinking cayenne hot sauce :fireball: Today I had some hot Thai that my friends were haveing a hard time eating and took the whole container of sauce and ate it up to find I could taste all the great characteristics of the peppers with a little swett and felt very clear. So I am eating 150,000 scoville peppers like they are nothing. :cool:

Edited by Capsicum, 17 February 2012 - 08:42 PM.


#32 jsschrstrcks

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 08:50 PM

my tollerance is up around the habanero level... I puree smoked habaneros and use it on pretty much everything... by the teaspoon full... Looking forward to my superhots producing something spicier this year...

Back on topic - I've heard you can get worm juice (the goo that drips out of the end of the rows at worm farms) and feed that to your pepper plants... Its tricked into beliving its being invaded, and increases production of capsaicin to protect its fruit from the worms. As I recall its mostly worm castings in the worm juice... *shrug* As has been said, if its already overwhelmingly hot to start with (as should be the case with any super hot) then why make it hotter? once you've eaten them for a season or so, and they don't/barely affect you, then maybe its time to work in some worm juice, or play around with wattering them... That said a stressed plant is a less productive plant.

#33 Capsicum

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 08:54 PM

"tollerance is up around the habanero level... I puree smoked habaneros and use it on pretty much everything... by the teaspoon full... "

Wow!!!! :mouthonfire:

Sorry for getting off subject :halo:

#34 OROZCONLECHE

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 12:26 AM

Well I've been habaneros for ever took a ghost pepper and want something in between but I wouldn't mind eating super or megahots with my meals
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#35 Naga Chomper

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 12:49 AM

At 8,000 max scoville a Jalapeno is not very hot at all. Not like I cayenne at a max of 50,000 scoville. Jalapeno peppers have high level of vit. C but not heat.



All depends. I have been eating supers for several years now, and had an experience last summer that blew my expectations clean out of the water.

I went to a BBQ at my folk's house, and my mom, knowing I like hot stuff bought some organically grown jalapenos at the local farmer's market.
Not only were they absolutely DELICIOUS, they were every bit as hot as any habanero I have ever had, orange OR red. Gave me a few hiccups and all :D They weren't very big, and their flavor was quite unique. VERY deep flavor, not at all overly watery, or muted. And not a flavor you would normally associate with a jalapeno. They would easily have made the most awesome poppers on the planet.

My mistake was just assuming they were garden variety jalapenos, and gnawing down before I saved any seeds.

Needless to say, I will be frequenting the farmer's market this year in search of a repeat.
Hot, dry, high desert summer growing season did something to those I hardly expected in a good way. It would have been interesting to know exactly how hot they would have tested, because they were WAY over 8k Scoville.

#36 POTAWIE

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 06:01 AM

At 8,000 max scoville a Jalapeno is not very hot at all. Not like I cayenne at a max of 50,000 scoville. Jalapeno peppers have high level of vit. C but not heat. I think people may differ but I may have built my tolerance up from drinking cayenne hot sauce :fireball: Today I had some hot Thai that my friends were haveing a hard time eating and took the whole container of sauce and ate it up to find I could taste all the great characteristics of the peppers with a little swett and felt very clear. So I am eating 150,000 scoville peppers like they are nothing. :cool:


My only problem is the way you word it "Not very hot at all" then "no heat" There is definitely heat in jalapenos although you and most of us here have built up tolerance. Most people here can eat 200000+ SHU peppers without blinking but sometimes a jalapeno can still set us off
You may want to try some different jalapeno types that are hotter or have more consistant heat without "stressing". There are jals over 10000SHU but they also have different capsaicinoids which provide a different burn. Sure they are milder than cayennes but way way more flavorful
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#37 Capsicum

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 10:57 AM

My only problem is the way you word it "Not very hot at all" then "no heat" There is definitely heat in jalapenos although you and most of us here have built up tolerance. Most people here can eat 200000+ SHU peppers without blinking but sometimes a jalapeno can still set us off
You may want to try some different jalapeno types that are hotter or have more consistant heat without "stressing". There are jals over 10000SHU but they also have different capsaicinoids which provide a different burn. Sure they are milder than cayennes but way way more flavorful


That is cool how diiferent peppers provide different "burns". I grow jalapenos because there just is not a better pepper for salsa and nachos!!!! Not only that I live in the north and Jalapenos are very well adapted.

#38 AlabamaJack

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 05:07 PM

print this out and post it in your grow room...


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#39 OROZCONLECHE

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 07:33 PM

print this out and post it in your grow room...


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How Come? any particular Reason?
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#40 armac

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 08:06 PM

Uhhhhhhhhhhhh, think.....that should cause any plant some stress. That is what you were looking for, right?
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