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Germination time of moruga seeds


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#1 Ferrero

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 04:55 AM

Hey guys,

I've planted some moruga seeds about 2 weeks ago, soaked the seeds for 24hours planted in jiffy 7s and so far i have one seed which has germinated at the week 1 mark and is now about 3cms tall. I've read that the super hots can take 3 weeks to sprout is it unusual to get a seed to germinate in the first week? temps are around 30 degrees in a incubator :)

#2 Steve5000

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 06:34 AM

30 degrees may be too warm, I planted 40 MS seeds and had 80% germination rate at 25 degrees. Took 10 days to see any of the seeds come through, but had everything come through in 27 days. Just my experience.

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#3 Joseph Stalin

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 07:14 AM

30 celsius im guessing you meant there, it should be between 80-85 degrees F. If you feel like doing a conversion, you'll find you main probably im thinking.


Other then that, more time.

#4 Ferrero

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 07:21 AM

so half a degree over 85 is 29.44c so yea more time i guess twidle the thumbs

#5 mygrassisblue

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 08:29 AM

My research I stumbled across someone claiming that Super Hots with true seeds will NOT sprout early. I think the true seeds are somewhat fussy. That being said I still need to post my " Ghetto GLOG" . Check the PH ! Tap water can cause issues. Since heat rises it helps to have them on a middle shelf at the very lowest. Be patient !

#6 POTAWIE

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 08:48 AM

What type of Moruga? Likely Trinidad scorpion Moruga blend?
It doesn't really matter, all C. chinense generally germinate the same. Usually between 3 days and 3 weeks, although I never wait more than 2 weeks unless seeds are extremely rare.
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#7 simon

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 10:56 AM

Hi Wildfire.

I have been having mixed success with Jiffy's. The positive is that once seedlings do sprout, they grow quite nicely. On the negative, my germination rate is quite low - and down to zero in some cases.

I am growing 2 types of Maruga at the moment - Red and Yellow. They were planted at the same time and have sat next to each other since the day they were planted. However, of the 18 Red that were planted, only 6 have sprouted but they are growing quite strongly. On the other hand, none of the yellows have sprouted.

See this glog... http://thehotpepper....in-w-australia/

All the best.

Edited by simon, 25 April 2012 - 09:00 PM.

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#8 FuzeBox

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 11:27 AM

I'm still partial to the paper towel-sandwich baggie method. Jiffy starters etc saturate the seed in too much moisture and thereby slow the germination process regardless of temperature.

Edit:

Via moist paper towels the slowest germinating seeds(Thai, Bhut, Tepin, Piquin) show full germination within 8 days at 75 degrees. Out of 16 in a pack of Bhut seeds 14 germinated within 8 days and the other two were cracked or damaged. It all comes down to user-preference so whatever you choose is up to you. I just know what works the most efficiently for me from 16 years of growing experience.

Edited by FuseBoxShot, 25 April 2012 - 11:37 AM.

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#9 mrz1988

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 11:43 AM

My morugas germinated at around the 10-12 day mark this year. I would not be at all surprised to see them pop earlier than that, they are less stubborn than a lot of other super hots. I had the hardest time germinating the chocolate varieties which took around 2-3 weeks.

Edited by mrz1988, 25 April 2012 - 11:44 AM.

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#10 Dulac

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 12:08 PM

What type of Moruga? Likely Trinidad scorpion Moruga blend?
It doesn't really matter, all C. chinense generally germinate the same. Usually between 3 days and 3 weeks, although I never wait more than 2 weeks unless seeds are extremely rare.


This is true. My morouga came up in only 5-7 days (wasn't keeping track) whereas other c. chinese took longer. I germinated mine in potting mix in a red cup with a zip lock bag as the humidity dome. I had good seeds and just planted one (because I was so confident in them). How long it takes to germinate depends on seed quality, genetics, and growing conditions.

My morugas germinated at around the 10-12 day mark this year. I would not be at all surprised to see them pop earlier than that, they are less stubborn than a lot of other super hots. I had the hardest time germinating the chocolate varieties which took around 2-3 weeks.


I only planted one moruga seed. It surprised me because it wasn't stubborn and grew so quick. My habanero chocolates have been the worst germinating and growing. Boy are they slow!

Edited by Dulac, 25 April 2012 - 12:11 PM.


#11 Joseph Stalin

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 02:28 PM

I only planted one moruga seed. It surprised me because it wasn't stubborn and grew so quick. My habanero chocolates have been the worst germinating and growing. Boy are they slow!


Not quite true. My morouga's were sprouted in about a week in the paper towel method. I know seeds vary but I think you just need to find the best method for each type of seed. For example, brainstrains in jiffy pellet, 3 weeks. In paper towel method, 2 days. :)

#12 POTAWIE

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 02:39 PM

Just calling them Morougas/Morugas may get very confusing since there are also Moruga reds and yellows which are landrace Trinidad varities and very different. Best to call them Trinidad scorpion Moruga blend(TSMB) or at least scorpion Morugas
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#13 Dulac

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 02:43 PM

Not quite true. My morouga's were sprouted in about a week in the paper towel method. I know seeds vary but I think you just need to find the best method for each type of seed. For example, brainstrains in jiffy pellet, 3 weeks. In paper towel method, 2 days. :)


What isn't quite true? I'm not surprised they sprouted in a week using the paper towel method. My brain strains have been in paper towels with zip lock bags for about 2 weeks with nothing yet. I don't think either method is better than the other. I noticed that one of the two methods I use don't appear to be faster than the other. I do it that way so I don't have to transplant them right away. The brain strains are giving me a little trouble, so I decided to try the paper towel method (the method I used to use). The only conditions they really need are 80-85 degrees, humidity, and wetness. Both methods deliver this.

#14 loki

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 04:07 PM

Better than paper towels is perlite in zip-locks, then put in oven with the pilot light on (or on top of water heater, or other warm - 85-90 degree place).  Wet the perlite, then nearly close the zip-lock and pour out all the water leaving only that that clings. Add the seeds, and close.  Open every now and then to let in air.  Seelings don't rot as easily, are much easier to get out of the bag.  I like even better, using petri dishes (plastic ones), but they are not readily available (my University Chem Lab will sell me them) = and they are online too.  I use clear duct tape to close these - and they are never 'sealed'.  They stack, are easily labeled (but do label both tops and bottoms).  I've started thousands of seeds of all kinds - cold stratified, warm stratified, warm moist, with light, no light, and this is the best of all.  Perlite, which I really don't like otherwise, works very well with seeds.

 

Every kind of paper I've used tends to mold, while perlite does not.  Paper also will cling to the roots and damage is more likely when trying to separate and plant them.  Paper works, but perlite works better.

 

However, I usually just start my peppers in flats of soiless seed starting mix (high in sphagnum, but not peat).  I also put in warm place (nearly 90 degrees) for about three days.  Sometimes I alternate with cooler temps (this sometimes seems to speed germination).  Then I put the flats on heat mats under lights - (now about 80 degrees). This year my T.S. moruga's came up in about 8 days - about mid-long for all the peppers I started.






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