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Cayenne's Guide to Vermicompost a.k.a. WORMS!!!

Worm worm bin worm tea vermicompost vermiculture worm castings compost compost tea

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#1 Cayennemist

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Posted 12 June 2012 - 11:40 PM

mine

Edited by Cayennemist, 08 August 2012 - 06:59 PM.

"Try not. Do... or do not. There is no try."   ~Yoda


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#2 Cayennemist

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 01:52 AM

mine

Edited by Cayennemist, 08 August 2012 - 07:00 PM.

"Try not. Do... or do not. There is no try."   ~Yoda


#3 bigbodybussey

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 02:49 AM

Awesome...I would love to try this.
You say,"tomato", I say, "grow a pepper."

#4 Cayennemist

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 03:47 AM

mine

Edited by Cayennemist, 08 August 2012 - 07:01 PM.

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#5 Cayennemist

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 05:36 AM

mine





Edited by Cayennemist, 08 August 2012 - 07:01 PM.

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#6 MGOLD86

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 09:01 AM

This is great stuff, thanks. This should be a sticky, we don't have anything like this in such a great format.

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#7 Captain Capsaicin

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 11:58 AM

This should definitely be a sticky! Thanks for posting this. Awesome stuff!

#8 Rawkstah

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 02:13 PM

I second the sticky motion.

#9 USMC8411

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 02:13 PM

Excellent info Cay... Keep up the great posts!

#10 Pepper-Guru

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 02:41 PM

Great job! Great pictorial!
Feed the Soil

#11 millworkman

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 05:34 PM

Pinned!! Keep the good info coming.

#12 Cayennemist

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 07:24 PM

mine

Edited by Cayennemist, 08 August 2012 - 07:01 PM.

"Try not. Do... or do not. There is no try."   ~Yoda


#13 HotPeppas

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 07:55 PM

Is there any benefits from adding straight live worms to the garden?

#14 Cayennemist

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 10:56 PM

Is there any benefits from adding straight live worms to the garden?


Yes!
They will aerate your soil and also leave behind castings. This is good because it will allow roots to grow faster and bigger with less energy.
The bad thing is, the worms are free to come and go as they please. Once they eat all they want in that area there is nothing stopping them from leaving.

If you have a In ground bed, chances are you already have worms in it, but adding more wont hurt anything except maybe your wallet.

Edited by Cayennemist, 13 June 2012 - 10:56 PM.

"Try not. Do... or do not. There is no try."   ~Yoda


#15 bigbodybussey

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Posted 14 June 2012 - 04:35 AM

... (technically you would be harvesting them)

...

thanks for clearing that up for me, I've been trying for days with no results, haha


You say,"tomato", I say, "grow a pepper."

#16 HotPeppas

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Posted 14 June 2012 - 11:08 AM

Yeah i have a raised bed. Thanks:)

Any special worms i need?

Yeah i have a raised bed. Thanks:)

Any special worms i need?

Yeah i have a raised bed. Thanks:)

Any special worms i need?

#17 Captain Capsaicin

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Posted 14 June 2012 - 11:49 AM

I'm definitely interested in doing this. Are there any smells/odors associated with vermicomposting? In order to keep the temps right I'll have to do this inside and I'm trying to get a sense of how much resistance I should expect to encounter from my wife.

#18 Cayennemist

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Posted 14 June 2012 - 07:29 PM

mine

Edited by Cayennemist, 08 August 2012 - 07:02 PM.

"Try not. Do... or do not. There is no try."   ~Yoda


#19 LGHT

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Posted 15 June 2012 - 10:56 AM

Notice he said his took 3 monthes, thats what happens when you use a lot of papper which is harder to break down.


The reason he said 3 months is that's what it takes on average to get mature castings that are completely broken down. When you add fresh food to the worm bin it starts to break down and goes into a mesophilic process. A mesophile is an organism that thrives in temperatures between 70-104 degrees Fahrenheit. So the bin heats up quite a bit allowing these organisms to multiply exponentially until it can cool back down. The entire process or "cycle" takes a few months. If you remove anything from the bin prior to that your castings will probably be moist and sticky. The reason for this is because it contains a good amount of Lechate and hasn't completely broken down. Leachate contains phytotoxins (toxins that can harm plants). Some of these toxins are created by bacteria. Unfortunately, not all bacteria are good and not allowing your bin to complete a cycle will introduce these harmful bacteria to your plant.

Mature castings should be fairly dry and very fine like sand as it's completely broken down to it's final state.

#20 Cayennemist

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Posted 15 June 2012 - 01:20 PM

mine

Edited by Cayennemist, 08 August 2012 - 07:02 PM.

"Try not. Do... or do not. There is no try."   ~Yoda






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Worm, worm bin, worm tea, vermicompost, vermiculture, worm castings, compost, compost tea

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