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Beginner's guide to AACT/Compost Tea

compost tea vermicompost tea aact organic compost myco mycorh mycorrhizae guano

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#921 Myxlplyk

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Posted 01 May 2016 - 05:56 PM

I'm not 100% sold on Alberta's research. He did an experiment on biochar and rock dust, which I don't agree with his scientific methods there. Otherwise, I like his gardening advice. Having said that, I cannot find any research on gardening with chloramine, so I may as well concede that the dirt does protect the bacteria enough to allow them to thrive, because you and someone else says it does good in your compost pile. However, that is not to say it doesn't kill beneficial bacteria. There are cases of leaky gut and irritable bowel, the latter disappears soon after they stop drinking chloramine water. Also, it kills the good bacteria in fish tanks, which ultimately can and will kill the fish. Some people get skin problems when showering with it, but that's likely an allergic reaction. Overall, I'm going to stick with my rainwater plan, but use chloramine water until I do. I'm one of those who doesn't like it when the government gives us our medicine, but neglects to come clean with ALL of their research... chloramine, Roundup and GMOs, etc.

 

Does anyone who does hydroponics use water with chloramine? I don't know enough about it to know if they count on bacteria in the water or not. If not, I wonder if direct contact damages the plants. I know there are some pissed off dope growers on the subject.



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#922 solid7

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Posted 01 May 2016 - 08:16 PM

I'm not 100% sold on Alberta's research.


Fair enough. I'm not here to make any disciples. I'm just passing on info - and his was the easiest read. His experiment for the water was spot on. And, there is also the fact that I've been using the municipal water for most of my life. (there was a period of time where I got a little hung up on not using it) So for me, it's not like this whole thing work like faith in God, or something.

There is nothing wrong with you using your rainwater. I just wanted to let others know that it isn't the end, if you have to resort to the tap. Believe me, it took me a long time to get comfortable with the idea of using it. But I did, and it's fine.
 

Does anyone who does hydroponics use water with chloramine?


Here is where I absolutely WILL NOT use municipal water. The whole point of hydroponics, is to try to take control of every variable. Once you've started with water that isn't pure, or has something that isn't normally accounted/adjusted for, you've already given up part of that control over the process - and you may never be able to GET control. So for this hydro grower, no way.

Edited by solid7, 01 May 2016 - 08:17 PM.

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#923 Myxlplyk

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Posted 02 May 2016 - 10:14 AM

Thanx for clearing that up for me, Solid. I'd rather not have to do anything with my water, until I get the rain system up. Humic acid can cost some bux.



#924 solid7

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Posted 02 May 2016 - 11:18 AM

Thanx for clearing that up for me, Solid. I'd rather not have to do anything with my water, until I get the rain system up. Humic acid can cost some bux.


Well, there will be those who disagree... I'm surprised that nobody has yet. :D

At any rate, the only thing that matters at the end of the conversation, is the ability to grow. And I wouldn't still be wasting time with those methods if they didn't work. (I'm rather particular) In a perfect world, you wouldn't have chloramines, but in a less than perfect world, chloramines don't pose much of a problem in the limited concentrations they are added in. Which leads to the point that it's always the danger you run into with scientific research... What is perfect in a lab doesn't always correlate well to real life conditions, and experiments aren't always conducted by people who are "in touch" with the research. For some people, anything less than optimum is unacceptable. There is a gaping void between academia and application, but it's not insurmountable.

I encourage you to test this for yourself, and never give it to naysayers. All things are fair to be questioned. ;)
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#925 John1234

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 09:00 AM

If you can get past the Canadian-ness of this guy's speech, his experiment is sound. It's all in layman's terms, so it's pretty easy consumptionspamease note, that while it does say chlorinated water, the gentleman explains how chlorine become chloramine in the water


Racist.

He's an Albertan. They like to keep it in the family, on the farm, or in the stable.

Still waiting on your exceedingly efficient and timely government (AG extension) to email the references of said studies used on a number of their websites. Bloody hell slow.

#926 solid7

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 09:07 AM

Racist.

He's an Albertan. They like to keep it in the family, on the farm, or in the stable.

Still waiting on your exceedingly efficient and timely government (AG extension) to email the references of said studies used on a number of their websites. Bloody hell slow.



Hahaha!!! I guess I was wrong, since he's not one of those "real" Canadians... You know - the ones that speak French. ;)

Besides, technically I would be a xenophobe, not a racist! :D

Edited by solid7, 04 May 2016 - 09:09 AM.

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#927 Hybrid_Mode_01

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Posted 10 May 2016 - 07:08 AM

 

 


 

Chlorine or chloramine?

 

 

     I don't think it really matters in this context.


"It's a personal preference!"     -some annoying preacher


#928 mrgrowguy

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Posted 12 May 2016 - 12:44 PM

 

 

     I don't think it really matters in this context.

 

Agreed - Chlorine and Cloramine - practical difference is one dissipates from the water faster. Chloramine was added to keep the tap water chlorinated longer.

 

It takes about 24 hours of (1 gallon of water?) being in an open container for chlorine to evaporate out, but it takes about 5-7 days for chloramine.

 

 

Check local tap water sources to see what they add. My area has hefty amounts of chloramine. If you're on well water, lucky you!

 

You can also pick up specific dechlorinators from pet/fish supply stores that state on the bottle it will remove chloramines... BUT be warned, they will may raise your ph drastically. And be sure to look for it on the label, many dechlorinators do not remove chloramines.

 

 

OH, and my take on chlorine in soil... I feel it does kill off benies, just not all of them. Some will definitely survive. Those will bloom back and flourish if treated nicely (good overall environment for them). Is it good to cut the population down and have it rebuild? Maybe... Sounds like a metaphor for pruning or not to pruning.

 

...........................................................................

 

That being said:

I don't do teas anymore, too much time demand and scheduling for my lifestyle and desires. But I did do a lot of research on dechlorinators.

 

Personally, now I just fill a 20 gallon res with tap and let it sit [aerated] for 2-4 days before using, and not sweat the small stuff :) but that's just me. My res size is just about perfect for me. I care for about 15 mature plants and 15-25 clones/seedlings at any given time.

 

I have found that doing less with my plants usually makes them (and me) happier.

 

 

 

.


Edited by mrgrowguy, 12 May 2016 - 12:56 PM.

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#929 mrgrowguy

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Posted 12 May 2016 - 12:59 PM

Thanx for clearing that up for me, Solid. I'd rather not have to do anything with my water, until I get the rain system up. Humic acid can cost some bux.

 

 

Humic acid IS expensive, but I have a farm supply store by me (Orange County Farm Supply) and they carry a 12% (very watered down) humic acid. But a 30 or 50 lb bag (cannot remember - it's about the size of the largest green bag of perlite from depot) only cost me about $25! I also bought a 40lb bag of azomite from there that should last  me three lifetimes.

 

I have been using the same bag for a year now and haven't even used a quarter of it yet.

 

I had to ask for it specifically, usually commercial landscapers are the ones who buy it, and it's not on the shelves.

 

I did not read what you considered using it for, too lazy, but I use mine for soil amendment, so this may or may not work for you...

 

.


Edited by mrgrowguy, 12 May 2016 - 01:03 PM.

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#930 solid7

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Posted 12 May 2016 - 01:05 PM

Humic acid IS expensive,


I was just about to post an Amazon link, whereby I recently purchased 25lb of 70% Humic acid derived from Leonardite, for $43, shipped to my door. However, it appears that I bought the last bag at that price, as it is now $92 for the same, and therefore, I cannot refute in any measure the validity of your statement. :D
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#931 Myxlplyk

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Posted 12 May 2016 - 08:54 PM

 

 

Humic acid IS expensive, but I have a farm supply store by me (Orange County Farm Supply) and they carry a 12% (very watered down) humic acid. But a 30 or 50 lb bag (cannot remember - it's about the size of the largest green bag of perlite from depot) only cost me about $25! I also bought a 40lb bag of azomite from there that should last  me three lifetimes.

 

I have been using the same bag for a year now and haven't even used a quarter of it yet.

 

I had to ask for it specifically, usually commercial landscapers are the ones who buy it, and it's not on the shelves.

 

I did not read what you considered using it for, too lazy, but I use mine for soil amendment, so this may or may not work for you...

 

.

 

I had read in more than one forum and article, that humic acid breaks up the chlorine and ammonia in chloramine, so that it can dissipate like chlorine does.



#932 mrgrowguy

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Posted 13 May 2016 - 02:23 AM

AHH, I see. Interesting.


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#933 solid7

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Posted 13 May 2016 - 05:23 AM

 

I had read in more than one forum and article, that humic acid breaks up the chlorine and ammonia in chloramine, so that it can dissipate like chlorine does.

 

It's way too expensive to be used for that purpose...


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#934 Myxlplyk

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Posted 13 May 2016 - 12:56 PM

 

It's way too expensive to be used for that purpose...

 

Takes very little. I only used it when I was making compost tea. But it's used for that purpose anyway. I would agree it's too expensive to just use for watering.



#935 ColdSmoke

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Posted 13 May 2016 - 01:21 PM

I read an article by Oregon State that said a good one inch layer of mulch will filter out the chlorine / chloramine, so by the time the solution hits the root zone it's not a concern. 



#936 solid7

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Posted 13 May 2016 - 01:34 PM

 

Takes very little. I only used it when I was making compost tea. But it's used for that purpose anyway. I would agree it's too expensive to just use for watering.

 

I wouldn't have thought to use it in a compost tea.  Typically compost teas contain humic and fulvic acids naturally - especially if using worm castings. 
 


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#937 Myxlplyk

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Posted 13 May 2016 - 07:17 PM

 

I wouldn't have thought to use it in a compost tea.  Typically compost teas contain humic and fulvic acids naturally - especially if using worm castings. 
 

 

I'm not a huge fan of brewed tea (too much work and too expensive), but I got that and fish emulsions for some, to charge my biochar. I ended up using steeped tea instead. But a lot of youtube peeps use those two with molasses for their brewed tea.



#938 solid7

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 03:23 PM

 

I'm not a huge fan of brewed tea (too much work and too expensive), but I got that and fish emulsions for some, to charge my biochar. I ended up using steeped tea instead. But a lot of youtube peeps use those two with molasses for their brewed tea.

 

Worm castings in a paint strainer bag, with a cheap aerator...  I usually don't add anything else, besides the water and molasses.

What exactly were you referring to that was more expensive?


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#939 Myxlplyk

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 05:26 PM

 

Worm castings in a paint strainer bag, with a cheap aerator...  I usually don't add anything else, besides the water and molasses.

What exactly were you referring to that was more expensive?

 

The ingredients of the brewed vs steeped tea. My plants aren't overly picky.



#940 G.G Allin

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 05:40 PM

I've seen some home compost tea kits online are these recommended or frowned upon?







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: compost tea, vermicompost, tea, aact, organic, compost, myco, mycorh, mycorrhizae, guano

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