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Storing Dried Peppers


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#1 HillBilly Jeff

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 05:04 PM

What is the best way to store dried peppers while you wait to get enough to grind? What about long term storage? Just it just need to be in an airtight container?

Thanks.

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#2 wayright

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 05:28 PM

You can use a big baggie, like a 1 or 2 gallon zip!

I grind mine as they dry and store the powder in a glass jar!

:cool:
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#3 tfmiltz

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 05:55 PM

I use Ball Jars too.

I do NOT recommend plastic baggies though, if it breaks ? You've got a disaster and if children are around ? Might as well just call Serv Pro to come and re-dry wall the room.

BUT- glass can break too- AH - I bet stainless steel is the best.
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#4 Dave2000

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 09:46 AM

Airtight container but for longer term storage toss some dry rice or another desiccant in the bottom, and package soon after dehydrating so they have the lowest moisture level possible.

#5 OhioHeat

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Posted 15 August 2012 - 03:32 PM

I'm curious about this too. In the past I didn't grow much and storage wasn't much of a concern but now I grow a lot more and worry about my dried peppers being "safe and healthy" for over a years time.
I currently dry mine completely (as in crisp) in halves and from there what I don't grind for weekly use I put in properly cleaned Ball© jars and store in my cupboard.
I have been considering using the vacuum sealing food savers as I believe the less air contact the better. (for any food item)
I only use this for my scotch bonnets and Jamaican hot chocs that I grow exclusively now.
Since I give my peppers out I don't want to give anyone a bad experience because of poor storage. I already have to hear them whine when they put too much on/in their foods cause they don't believe how :hot: they can get.

#6 Dave2000

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 02:14 PM

^ Mark them with a "best if used before" date, whatever period you want but I'd pick 1 year. In theory they will last years in an absence of oxygen and moisture if kept cool, though eventually the oils may go rancid and impart a nasty taste and smell.

#7 salsalady

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 08:56 PM

OhioHeat, the things that make "nasties" grow in food is moisture, temperature, and a food source (the chiles). With the moisture gone, that'll keep the nasties from growing. If you "dry to a crisp" and then put them in a clean, dry, well-sealed jar, you're good to go for a looooong time.

Dried chiles and chile powders should theoretically last indefinitley. Barring something going south (like what Dave2K mentioned with the rancid oils), just keep everything in a cool dry place. Vac-seal if you have the capacity, or just store in tight lidded jars.

side note- many people have commented that they like to grind their chiles into powder right before using them. So if you have the option of putting the dried chiles into smaller packages/jars, then when you need some powder, you don't have to open the large jar for only a few chiles. Just open the smaller jar, whizz it up and Presto! Powder!
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#8 OhioHeat

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 07:33 PM

OhioHeat, the things that make "nasties" grow in food is moisture, temperature, and a food source (the chiles). With the moisture gone, that'll keep the nasties from growing. If you "dry to a crisp" and then put them in a clean, dry, well-sealed jar, you're good to go for a looooong time.

Dried chiles and chile powders should theoretically last indefinitley. Barring something going south (like what Dave2K mentioned with the rancid oils), just keep everything in a cool dry place. Vac-seal if you have the capacity, or just store in tight lidded jars.

side note- many people have commented that they like to grind their chiles into powder right before using them. So if you have the option of putting the dried chiles into smaller packages/jars, then when you need some powder, you don't have to open the large jar for only a few chiles. Just open the smaller jar, whizz it up and Presto! Powder!


I already do the things already mentioned. I also do my own canning and whatnot(have for years) but I guess for me I have been thinking about resale via the net for dried peppers but I realize that's a whole another thread soooo....

leftovers from last year.
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#9 JoynersHotPeppers

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 07:43 PM

I use all glass jars. I grind them to order and the color is amazing. My wife and I go through a 2oz jar monthly, I think we are addicted. I only suggest using plastic if it is BPA free and made for food preservation. Many plastic bags do not hold peppers well.
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#10 redeyeguy

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 10:42 PM

I first place them in zip-loc bags, and then place the bags in a big tupperware container, which I then place in the freezer. They'll last extra long while also being safe from meal moths. Since they are dehydrated, you can eat them right out of the freezer!

Edited by redeyeguy, 17 August 2012 - 10:42 PM.


#11 MW215

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 11:48 AM

I've dried a bunch of my peppers and ground them to create powders and stored them in small Ball jelly jars. My one issue is that the powders clump slightly. Does this mean that the peppers weren't fully dried or is this normal with the oils from the peppers?

Edited by MW215, 20 August 2012 - 03:37 PM.


#12 JoynersHotPeppers

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 12:00 PM

I've dried a bunch of my peppers and ground them to create powders and stored them in small Ball jelly jars. My one issue is that the powders clump slightly. Does this mean that the peppers were fully dried or is this normal with the oils from the peppers?

I find this happens when not dried enough. I saw someone else post they simply place the powder back in the dehydrator to solve the problem.
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#13 PEPPERMEISTER1

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 10:16 AM

I store my dried peppers whole and just keep one pint size jar of powder at a time. I know a lot of people like to rush all of their dried pods into powder right away but It's best to keep the dried pods whole for as long as possible. As soon as you powder them, your'e breaking them down so much that you've accelarated the aging process and then it's just a couple of months before the powder gets that stale store-bought taste instead of showcasing the freshness.

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#14 hepsy

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Posted 29 March 2017 - 04:19 PM

Store, and put freshly picked peppers in a lauhala (or wicker) papertowel-lined basket, and set on top shelf of fridge. They'll dry naturally, and stay dry, until they're used. Then crush a few to have on hand. Store in well-sealed glass container. No plastic.
I gave away my dehydrator after I inadvertently discovered peppers and other things dry nicely and naturally as I described. My brother dries peppers and things in the winter by hanging to dry, but it's way too humid here for that.

Edited by hepsy, 29 March 2017 - 04:20 PM.

~aloha

#15 JoynersHotPeppers

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Posted 29 March 2017 - 04:27 PM

Store, and put freshly picked peppers in a lauhala (or wicker) papertowel-lined basket, and set on top shelf of fridge. They'll dry naturally, and stay dry, until they're used. Then crush a few to have on hand. Store in well-sealed glass container. No plastic.
I gave away my dehydrator after I inadvertently discovered peppers and other things dry nicely and naturally as I described. My brother dries peppers and things in the winter by hanging to dry, but it's way too humid here for that.

:welcome:

 

 

This does not hold true for most all chinese, they will mold and rot before they dry. 


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#16 hepsy

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Posted 29 March 2017 - 04:53 PM

:welcome:
 
 
This does not hold true for most all chinese, they will mold and rot before they dry. 

Most all chinese may not dry this way, I don't know. I haven't tried them, but would.
Several varieties of peppers (no, I don't know their names-yet), mushrooms (crimini, shiitake), chives, rosemary and other things I've tried have successfully dried while in a lauhala basket in fridge. The only things that didn't dry that way were green leaves, like basil and mint.
I won't say it's a fail proof drying method, but living awhile in lauhala basket in fridge sure dried the peppers I've put in there. And they stay dry.

Edited by hepsy, 29 March 2017 - 04:54 PM.

~aloha

#17 Chewi

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Posted 30 March 2017 - 09:48 AM

. I saw someone else post they simply place the powder back in the dehydrator to solve the problem.

 

I remember reading that and wondering how in the hell that mess got cleaned up!!
 



#18 robanero41

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Posted 08 September 2018 - 08:04 AM

Hi all, I'm fairly new to making sauces, etc. so pardon my ignorance and inexperience. About 6-8 months ago I bought a large amount of dried jolokias, scotch bonnets, red moruga scorpions,....peppers from a farmer in Lancaster county, PA (Amish). I neglected to ask him when they were dried, how, etc. I was so excited I just couldn't wait to get home and make some sauces. But I've done some research, and don't want to meet any "nasties" in my sauces. So what I did with the peppers was put them in freezer bags, and put them in the freezer, where they still are. I've been taking out 10-12 at a time, rehydrating them, mixing with the usual vinegar, garlic, onions, etc. And I have have been using my ph meter to keep the sauces between 3.5 and 4.5. And I keep the sauces in the refrigerator and use them within 1-2 weeks usually. Problem is I purchased way more than I needed, and am wondering how not to waste the remainder of the peppers. I don't consume that much, but I try : )  I want to start learning and practicing sterilization / canning practices for future scenarios. But I don't have time right now. So should I trash them, grind them (but won't they hydrate?), or what? Honestly, I was never impressed with the taste of any of the sauces I made with the dried peppers. The heat was there, but I love to taste some flavor with my pain. That's why I love habaneros so much. Don't think I'll buy dried again. Got to learn to sterilize/bottle I guess, cause I NEED my peppers year round! Sorry for going on here, but I've needed to talk with someone on this topic for some time, and I've had no one. Forgive me. So any thoughts or ideas are welcome!


Edited by robanero41, 08 September 2018 - 08:06 AM.


#19 dragonsfire

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Posted 08 September 2018 - 08:56 AM

You can use the foodsaver on Mason jars, I do that as well at vacuum pack bags.



#20 AndyW

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Posted 08 September 2018 - 10:31 AM

Grinding into powder is always an option. You could also always add fresh peppers in with the dried for sauces for both flavor and heat.




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