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The Pest Guide

Aphids white fly gnats

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Poll: Broad Mites (45 member(s) have cast votes)

What Threat Level would you rate Broad Mites 1-10? Concider damage, control, prevention, and how annoying.

  1. 4 (2 votes [4.44%])

    Percentage of vote: 4.44%

  2. 5 (1 votes [2.22%])

    Percentage of vote: 2.22%

  3. 6 (5 votes [11.11%])

    Percentage of vote: 11.11%

  4. 7 (9 votes [20.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 20.00%

  5. 8 (12 votes [26.67%])

    Percentage of vote: 26.67%

  6. 9 (16 votes [35.56%])

    Percentage of vote: 35.56%

What Threat Level would you rate Fungus Gnats 1-10? Concider damage, control, prevention, and how annoying.

  1. 1 (4 votes [8.89%])

    Percentage of vote: 8.89%

  2. 2 (6 votes [13.33%])

    Percentage of vote: 13.33%

  3. 3 (11 votes [24.44%])

    Percentage of vote: 24.44%

  4. 4 (6 votes [13.33%])

    Percentage of vote: 13.33%

  5. 5 (7 votes [15.56%])

    Percentage of vote: 15.56%

  6. 6 (2 votes [4.44%])

    Percentage of vote: 4.44%

  7. 7 (2 votes [4.44%])

    Percentage of vote: 4.44%

  8. 8 (7 votes [15.56%])

    Percentage of vote: 15.56%

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#1 Cayennemist

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 03:44 AM

peststopbanner_zpsa3dd1021.png

 

 

 

 

Bugs, rodents, critters, plague, what ever you want to call em.
They eat your leaves, your roots, new growth, and some even cut your plants off at the stem.

After countless arguments and pages of trolling I have come to the conclusion that THP needs some sort of pest guide.

Below is a ever updating table of pests and their known remedies, organic and otherwise. Also you will find a threat level of 0 to 10 under each pest ID area. Also includes is a photo of each pest and can be found by clicking [ IMG ] next to each pest name.

 

To find a pest quickly, press [ Ctrl ] + [ F ] and type the name of the pest.


Please keep in mind that my personal preference is to avoid harsh chemicals and pesticides if possible, however I will try to keep my bias to my self.

 

Threat level: 5

Location: every where except Antarctica

Control:  Water with dish soap, 1 Tbsp of soap per gallon (avoid run off in to soil if possible)

Biological Control: Ladybugs and other beneficial insects.

Prevention:

Damage caused: Chewed up leaves, damaged new growth.

 

  • Broad mites IMG

Threat level:  6

Location:

Control:  Broad mites are susceptible to various miticides. However, they are more difficult to control in winter than in summer due to lower greenhouse temperatures. Neem helps but may harm beneficials in the long run.

Biological Control:  Broad mites are very sensitive to heat. Lowering infested plants into water held at 43 to 49�C for 15 minutes will destroy broad mites without damaging the plants.

Prevention:

          Damage caused:  chewing up leaves and growth tips.

 

  • Brown Garden Snail IMG

Threat level:  3

Location: Warm regions of EU and US

Control: Products with: METALDEHYDE, IRON PHOSPHATE, COPPER SULFATE.

Biological Control:  RUMINA DECOLLATA, a predatory snail that will eat the brown garden snail.Copper bands wrapped around the base of plants. Traps filled with beer or sugar water.

Prevention: Keep leaf litter cleaned up and remove any you see by hand.

Damage caused:  The brown garden snail eats large ragged holes in leaves and may totally consume seedlings. Low growing plants generally suffer the most damage, but this snail climbs trees to feed and has been reported as a pest in citrus orchards.

 

Threat level:

Location:

Control:

Biological Control:

Prevention:

Damage caused:

 

Threat level: 8

Location: worldwide other than Antarctica

Control: Fencing, electric fencing, slicing scented soap around the area, tying a pie plate or CD to a stick so it flaps in the wind, buckshot, crossbows, landmines...etc.

Biological Control: dusting with hot pepper powder, urinating near gardens, guineas and peacocks, planting in close proximity to squash or pumpkins, natural thicket barriers

Prevention: not much other than good barriers, having local population stabilization aka hunting, probably would help to not deliberately feed them in proximity to your garden

Damage caused: Trampling, stripping of leaves, broken branches, clipping and topping...many plants may recover and pod if it doesn't happen too late in the season, too  early in the season and some younger plants may not recover at all.

 

  • Fungus Gnat IMG

Threat level: 2 (4 indoors) although hard to get rid of damage is low.

Location: every where except Antarctica

Control: Neem, Azamax, Sticky Traps, Fly-in traps, Diluted Hydrogen peroxide soil drench.

Biological Control:AACT, Predatory insects. Spiders like Orb Weavers catch the adults in webs. Fly-in traps.

Prevention: Don't over water, leave the top of the soil dry as long ass possible between watering.

Keep your grow area clean of leaf litter and allow for predatory insects to roam your garden.

Damage caused: The larva can eat the roots of the plant slowing or stunting production

 

  • Leaf Miners IMG

Threat level: 1.5 (typically wont kill plants, just looks bad)

Location: every where except Antarctica

Control: No controls for the vegetable leafminers are recommended. Many insecticides have poor activity against these insects and often insecticide applications will make problems worse, by differentially destroying natural enemies.

Biological Control:AACT, Predatory insects. Spiders like Orb Weavers catch the adults in webs.

Prevention: Keep your grow area clean of leaf litter and allow for predatory insects to roam your garden.

Damage caused: Tunneling in leaves

 

  • Leafhopper IMG

Threat level:  1-4

Location: North America

Control: Chemical

Biological Control: Organic - Diatomaceous Earth, beneficial insects, insecticides. 

Prevention: Row Covers

Damage caused: Their toxic saliva causes spotting (white specks), yellowing, leaf curling, stunting and distortion of plants. They are also responsible for transmitting the organisms causing virus diseases in plants.

 

  • Red spider mites IMG

Threat level:7

Location: Everywhere

Control: Insecticidal soap, essential oils, Hot Pepper oil/wax, garlic oil, SM90, Azamax

Biological Control: A. cucumeris, D. coriaria (Rove Beetle), A. Fallacis, P. persimilis, S. punctillum, N. californicus, et al.

Prevention: Scouting/Inspection, Neem/Karanja oil, Lavender oil, companion planting (Chives, Mint, Yarrow. Dill), trap crops (Basil, Marigold, Beans)

Damage caused: Stippling on leaves, necrosis, stunted growth, plant death

 

  • Root Knot Nematode IMG

Threat level:7

Location: Everywhere

Control: Insecticidal soap, essential oils, Hot Pepper oil/wax, garlic oil, SM90, Azamax

Biological Control: "Solarization" is moderately effective: raised rows of soil are covered with plastic in the summertime. The high soil temperatures kill the nematodes. Several effective biological agents exist including Bacillus megaterium, Trichoderma album, Trichoderma harzianum, and Ascophyllum nodosum. These agents may not be available to the home gardner.

Prevention:Root Knot Nematodes can live on a wide variety of plants including grasses and weed species so prevention can be difficult once the pests are present.
Damage caused: The nematodes attack the roots of the plant and form galls (knots) on the roots that vary in size depending on the plant species. The root damage impairs the plant's ability to take up water and nutrients. Plants will droop even when there is sufficient soil moisture. Eventually plants will begin to show symptoms of Nitrogen deficiency (yellowing of lower leaves, stunted growth) even though there are sufficient nutrients in the soil.

 

 

  • Stink Bugs  IMG

Threat level:4 (ID first - non-parasitic and look-a-likes exist)

Location: most moderate climates

Control: pheromone trap, physical trap, removal, insecticidal soap, hot pepper sprays, pyrethroids

Biological Control: Orius insidiosus(Minute Pirate Bugs), Trissolcus spp. (parasitic wasp, exclusive to Asia)

Prevention: Neem oil, garlic/onion spray, companion planting (Mint, Nasturtium, Coriander, Borage, Garlic), weed control, row covers, fall till

Damage caused: pinpricks surrounded by discolouration, rotting lesions, pathogen spread

 

Threat level: 7

Location: most moderate climates

Control: Some Scale species can be killed with soaps that dissolve their waxy coatings, but hard shell scales are not effected. Prune off heavily infested twigs and branches to eliminate scales when infestations are on limited parts of the plant. Pruning to open up tree canopies helps to control black scale, citricola scale, and possibly other species in areas with hot summers, such as the Central Valley of California. This pruning increases scale mortality as a result of heat exposure.

Biological Control: Scales are often controlled by small parasitic wasps and predators including beetles, bugs, lacewings, and mites. Predatory Chilocorus, Hyperaspis, and Rhyzobius species lady beetles (ladybugs) can easily be overlooked because many are tiny, colored and shaped like scales, or feed beneath scales.

Prevention: Ant control, habitat manipulation, and pesticide management are the key conservation strategies. Grow flowering plants near scale-infested trees and shrubs to help attract and support natural enemies. Adults of predatory bugs, lacewings, lady beetles, and parasitic wasps live longer, lay more eggs, and kill more scales when they have plant nectar or pollen and insect honeydew to feed on. Minimize dust, which interferes with natural enemies. For example, wash plant surfaces midseason, or when the foliage is covered with dust.

Damage caused: leaves may look wilted, turn yellow, and drop prematurely. Scales sometimes curl leaves or cause deformed blemishes or discolored halos in fruit, leaves, or twigs. Bark infested with armored scales may crack and exude gum. Certain armored scales also feed on fruit, but this damage is often just aesthetic. Soft scales infest leaves and twigs but rarely feed on fruit. A major concern with soft scales is their excretion of abundant honeydew, which contaminates fruit, leaves, and surfaces beneath plants. Honeydew encourages the growth of black sooty mold and attracts ants, which in turn protect scales from natural enemies.

 

 

Threat level:

Location:Various species of thrips are present throughout North America
Control:Thrips can be very difficult to control with topical pesticides as they are able to hide in the tiny crevices of new leaves. Pyrethrins will kill on contact.
Biological Control:Predatory mites, predatory thrips, parasitic wasps: note that these predator insects will only attack certain species of thrips, so identification of the problem insect is necessary. Spinosad has been reported as an effective treatment. Neem oil and "narrow range" oils that are canola based have been shown to be moderately effective, but must be reapplied frequently.
Prevention:Removal of nearby overwinter host plants and weeds.
Damage caused:Thrips feed on the newest tender growth. Leaves will be stunted or deformed and will sometimes be hooked.
 

  • Tomato Hornworms IMG

Threat level:

Location:

Control:

Biological Control:

Prevention:

Damage caused:

 

  • Pepper weevils IMG

Threat level:

Location:

Control:

Biological Control:

Prevention:

Damage caused:

 

Threat level:

Location:

Control: Azamax

Biological Control: AACT, Encarsia,

Prevention: Clean grow environment

Damage caused:

 

Threat level: 5

Location: Interwebs

Control: Ignore them and they go away, eventually

Biological Control: Don't use computers

Prevention: None

Damage caused: Flame wars, aggravation, spam, and overall drama.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please feel free to help create this resource wiki style. Post below using the following format:

 

(cut and paste  the "PEST REPORT" in to your post ;) )


 

Pest name IMG

 

Threat level:  1-10

Location:

Control: Chemical

Biological Control: Organic

Prevention:

Damage caused:

 

 

Add a picture URL so that I can link it to the guide. with a [ IMG ] tag

 

Thanks for your help.

 

 

 

~Cayenne


Edited by Cayennemist, 18 July 2014 - 06:25 PM.

"Try not. Do... or do not. There is no try."   ~Yoda


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#2 Jeff H

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 07:01 AM

Cool idea Cayennemist. Getting all of the remedies in one thread will help keep the useful information in check.

 

Broad mites

 

Threat: 6

Your location: XXXX

Control: XXXX

Biological Control: a soak of Emulsified oil spray. Neem, canola, etc.

Prevention:

Damage caused: chewing up leaves and growth tips.


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#3 bigbodybussey

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 08:03 AM

Pretty Damn neat!
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#4 OCD Chilehead

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 08:42 AM

Thanks for your time and devotion to such a subject. Still learning about pest. If I find useful info I will contribute. Thanks again.
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#5 Cayennemist

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 11:53 AM

Cool idea Cayennemist. Getting all of the remedies in one thread will help keep the useful information in check.

 

Broad mites

 

Threat: 6

Your location: XXXX

Control: XXXX

Biological Control: a soak of Emulsified oil spray. Neem, canola, etc.

Prevention:

Damage caused: chewing up leaves and growth tips.

Perfect!!!

 

If we all team up we can make this a great resource for all.

 

 

also guys, if you see something you disagree with bring it up and we can always change or add to it.

 

@Millwork or other mods, Feel free to change or add to it if I become absent.


Edited by Cayennemist, 08 April 2014 - 11:55 AM.

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#6 bpwilly

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 03:14 PM

Threat level:  Not sure how I score this, but can say these always seem to show up in my greenhouse no matter what in the summer.

Location:Pacific NorthWest

Control:

Biological Control: Azamax  I know it is a kind of NEEM spray, but was the only thing that worked after several bottles of NEEM did not.

Prevention:  Do not let them build  up, start prevention at the first sign.   Also, around here, if I move the plants outside, the whiteflys seem to go away.  Not sure if it is the wind or sun or rain, but they do leave that plant within a few weeks.

Damage caused: Leaf damage, reduced plant growth, shriveling of leaves

 

Hope this helps.



#7 mrgrowguy

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 05:36 PM

I-HO-MEUP-NM.006.jpg

 

Threat level: 7

 

Location: every where except Antarctica

 

Control: ***1 tbsp Dawn original dish soap mixed with 1 gal water - kills aphids dead***  OR Neem oil (coats soft bodied insects and basically suffocates them, so application must be direct)

 

Biological Control: Assassin bugs, lacewing larvae, lady bugs (aphids are too small for most praying mantes)

 

Prevention: Neem - preventative spraying (not as aggressive as trying to control an infestation); keep area clear of dead or fallen leaves, utilize pest control on surrounding areas (I use a systemic insecticide on ornamentals that surround my peppers - of course, make sure none of it gets on or near the pepper itself - never use systemics on edible plants)

 

Damage caused: Sap Suckers - will cause leaf loss and could possibly lead to plant death

 

 

 

Smaller plants can be dunked in a bucket with neem solution, spraying works well just be sure to get the entire plant, top and bottom of leaves.

 

Spray every 3 days for at least 3 total applications.

 

What I use for a sprayer (click)


Edited by mrgrowguy, 27 April 2016 - 01:07 PM.

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#8 Kyox89

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 05:28 AM

Awesome thread guys!

#9 MeatHead1313

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 05:31 PM

Great idea Cayennemist! Being in only my 2nd season I haven't had to deal with too many pests yet, but will add what I can.

 

Threat level: XXXX

Location: Louisiana

Control: XXXX

Biological Control: lacewing larvae

Prevention: XXXX

Damage caused: similar to aphids. Can also transmit disease and mites


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#10 bpwilly

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 10:58 PM

Sharing -  I saw this post earlier this week from Moosery, and thought it might work out real well to get most or all the whiteflies when they show up in the greenhouse like they do every year.  Plus it will be using no chemicals.

 

http://thehotpepper....e-thrip-inator/



#11 Helvete

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 10:46 PM

I was under the assumption that aphids and whiteflies are the same animal but aphids are the larvae.


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#12 millworkman

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 07:11 AM

I was under the assumption that aphids and whiteflies are the same animal but aphids are the larvae.


Nope. A lot of times the shed skin of aphids is misdiagnosed but they are completely different creatures. Aphids are born pregnant and nearly in adult form.

#13 John1234

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 11:31 AM

How has no one done spider mites? Circus tent building asshats.

 

  • Red spider mites IMG

Threat level:5 (BM got 6? :D)

Location: Everywhere

Control: Insecticidal soap, essential oils, Hot Pepper oil/wax, garlic oil, SM90, Azamax

Biological Control: A. cucumeris, D. coriaria (Rove Beetle), A. Fallacis, P. persimilis, S. punctillum, N. californicus, et al.

Prevention: Scouting/Inspection, Neem/Karanja oil, Lavender oil, companion planting (Chives, Mint, Yarrow. Dill), trap crops (Basil, Marigold, Beans)

Damage caused: Stippling on leaves, necrosis, stunted growth, plant death



#14 Cayennemist

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 10:55 PM

How has no one done spider mites? Circus tent building asshats.

 

  • Red spider mites IMG

Threat level:5 (BM got 6? :D)

Location: Everywhere

Control: Insecticidal soap, essential oils, Hot Pepper oil/wax, garlic oil, SM90, Azamax

Biological Control: A. cucumeris, D. coriaria (Rove Beetle), A. Fallacis, P. persimilis, S. punctillum, N. californicus, et al.

Prevention: Scouting/Inspection, Neem/Karanja oil, Lavender oil, companion planting (Chives, Mint, Yarrow. Dill), trap crops (Basil, Marigold, Beans)

Damage caused: Stippling on leaves, necrosis, stunted growth, plant death

 

 

Updated! Thanks for your contribution.


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#15 filmost

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 05:33 PM

Anyone got a defense against leaf miners?
http://thehotpepper.com/topic/52479-filmost-2015/

#16 Cayennemist

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 11:40 AM

Update

Added:

 

Leaf Miners

Brown Snail

Forum Trolls


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#17 Helvete

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 08:28 PM

This one causes the most damage the fastest as far as I can tell:

 

 

Threat level: 8

Location: worldwide other than Antarctica

Control: Fencing, electric fencing, slicing scented soap around the area, tying a pie plate or CD to a stick so it flaps in the wind, buckshot, crossbows, landmines...etc.

Biological Control: dusting with hot pepper powder, urinating near gardens, guineas and peacocks, planting in close proximity to squash or pumpkins, natural thicket barriers

Prevention: not much other than good barriers, having local population stabilization aka hunting, probably would help to not deliberately feed them in proximity to your garden

Damage caused: Trampling, stripping of leaves, broken branches, clipping and topping...many plants may recover and pod if it doesn't happen too late in the season, too  early in the season and some younger plants may not recover at all.


Edited by ikeepfish, 25 April 2014 - 08:46 PM.

QVIS CVSTODIET IPSOS CVSTODES? -Juvenal The Satires


#18 Cayennemist

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 09:09 PM

This one causes the most damage the fastest as far as I can tell:

 

 

Threat level: 8

Location: worldwide other than Antarctica

Control: Fencing, electric fencing, slicing scented soap around the area, tying a pie plate or CD to a stick so it flaps in the wind, buckshot, crossbows, landmines...etc.

Biological Control: dusting with hot pepper powder, urinating near gardens, guineas and peacocks, planting in close proximity to squash or pumpkins, natural thicket barriers

Prevention: not much other than good barriers, having local population stabilization aka hunting, probably would help to not deliberately feed them in proximity to your garden

Damage caused: Trampling, stripping of leaves, broken branches, clipping and topping...many plants may recover and pod if it doesn't happen too late in the season, too  early in the season and some younger plants may not recover at all.

Haha Good one!

 

I will update in a few thanks!


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#19 Helvete

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 09:30 PM

I forgot to mention that guinea hens and peacocks are used as alarms, they make quite a ruckus when unknown animals, including people, enter the vicinity


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#20 Cayennemist

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 02:58 PM

Updated

 

 

Deer


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