Jump to content

  •  

Photo

The Pest Guide

Aphids white fly gnats

  • Please log in to reply
207 replies to this topic

Poll: Broad Mites (58 member(s) have cast votes)

What Threat Level would you rate Broad Mites 1-10? Concider damage, control, prevention, and how annoying.

  1. 4 (4 votes [6.90%])

    Percentage of vote: 6.90%

  2. 5 (3 votes [5.17%])

    Percentage of vote: 5.17%

  3. 6 (7 votes [12.07%])

    Percentage of vote: 12.07%

  4. 7 (10 votes [17.24%])

    Percentage of vote: 17.24%

  5. 8 (15 votes [25.86%])

    Percentage of vote: 25.86%

  6. 9 (19 votes [32.76%])

    Percentage of vote: 32.76%

What Threat Level would you rate Fungus Gnats 1-10? Concider damage, control, prevention, and how annoying.

  1. 1 (7 votes [12.07%])

    Percentage of vote: 12.07%

  2. 2 (9 votes [15.52%])

    Percentage of vote: 15.52%

  3. 3 (12 votes [20.69%])

    Percentage of vote: 20.69%

  4. 4 (7 votes [12.07%])

    Percentage of vote: 12.07%

  5. 5 (7 votes [12.07%])

    Percentage of vote: 12.07%

  6. 6 (5 votes [8.62%])

    Percentage of vote: 8.62%

  7. 7 (3 votes [5.17%])

    Percentage of vote: 5.17%

  8. 8 (8 votes [13.79%])

    Percentage of vote: 13.79%

Vote Guests cannot vote

#201 nmlarson

nmlarson

    Hot

  • Extreme
  • 786 posts
  • Location:Zone 7a/b, South Central Pennsylvania

Posted 01 August 2018 - 12:00 PM

You betcha.  

 

UHRREHLRMH1ZHL9ZXLWZ4L1ZMLNZ2HBZNHWZ7LJH

 

brown marmorated stink bug nymph


Edited by nmlarson, 01 August 2018 - 12:03 PM.

Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.        Robert Heinlein


#1A Guest

Guest

  • Guest
  • Pip
  • 1 post

#202 nmlarson

nmlarson

    Hot

  • Extreme
  • 786 posts
  • Location:Zone 7a/b, South Central Pennsylvania

Posted 08 August 2018 - 09:18 AM

In looking for some more information on the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), I stumbled across some photographs and other information that may be of help to others in indentification of the b******s.

 

 

From http://www.stopbmsb....cs/life-stages/

 

 

From left to right, four nymphal stages of BMSB (second through fifth instar), adult male, and adult female. Photo by W. Hershberger

BMSB_Figure2_0573.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

BMSB nymphs, first instar, cluster around a mass of newly-hatched eggs on the underside of a leaf. Photo by W. Hershberger

BMSB_Figure1_9852.jpg

 

 

And, from https://njaes.rutger...ug/identify.php:

 

The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug has a "shield" shaped body that is characteristic of all stink bugs. The adults are approximately 17 mm (5/8 inch) long with a mottled brownish grey color. The next to last (4th) antennal segment has a white band and several of the abdominal segments protrude from beneath the wings and are alternatively banded with black and white. The underside is white, sometimes with grey or black markings, and the legs are brown with faint white banding.

 

Adult Male

adult-male-full.jpg

 

Adult Female

adult-female-full.jpg

 

 

Aggregation on Crab Apple Leaf.

aggregation-full.jpg

 

The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug has five nymphal stages, or instars, and ranges in size from 2.4 mm to 12 mm in length. Unlike the adults who blend in very well with bark, the nymphs are more brightly colored with red and black. The first instars, which have a "tick-like" appearance, are not very active and remain around the hatched egg mass. Nymphs are characterized by dark reddish eyes and a yellowish-red abdomen that is also striped with black. The legs and antennae of the nymphs are black with white banding.

 

Eggs of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug.

eggs-full.jpg

The eggs of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug are often laid on the underside of leaves and a light green in color. They are elliptical in shape and are often deposited in a mass of approximately 28 eggs.

 

 

First Instar.

instars-i-full.jpg

 

Fourth Instar.

instar-iv-full.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 


Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.        Robert Heinlein


#203 YAMracer754

YAMracer754

    Hot

  • Extreme
  • 589 posts
  • aka:T-rist
  • Location:US

Posted 11 August 2018 - 10:48 PM

I've been dealing with them myself and you're right they are the scourge of the earth!!

In looking for some more information on the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), I stumbled across some photographs and other information that may be of help to others in indentification of the b******s.
 
 
From http://www.stopbmsb....cs/life-stages/
 
 
From left to right, four nymphal stages of BMSB (second through fifth instar), adult male, and adult female. Photo by W. Hershberger
BMSB_Figure2_0573.jpg
 
 
 
 
 
BMSB nymphs, first instar, cluster around a mass of newly-hatched eggs on the underside of a leaf. Photo by W. Hershberger
BMSB_Figure1_9852.jpg
 
 
And, from https://njaes.rutger...ug/identify.php:
 
The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug has a "shield" shaped body that is characteristic of all stink bugs. The adults are approximately 17 mm (5/8 inch) long with a mottled brownish grey color. The next to last (4th) antennal segment has a white band and several of the abdominal segments protrude from beneath the wings and are alternatively banded with black and white. The underside is white, sometimes with grey or black markings, and the legs are brown with faint white banding.
 
Adult Male
adult-male-full.jpg
 
Adult Female
adult-female-full.jpg
 
 
Aggregation on Crab Apple Leaf.
aggregation-full.jpg
 
The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug has five nymphal stages, or instars, and ranges in size from 2.4 mm to 12 mm in length. Unlike the adults who blend in very well with bark, the nymphs are more brightly colored with red and black. The first instars, which have a "tick-like" appearance, are not very active and remain around the hatched egg mass. Nymphs are characterized by dark reddish eyes and a yellowish-red abdomen that is also striped with black. The legs and antennae of the nymphs are black with white banding.
 
Eggs of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug.
eggs-full.jpg
The eggs of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug are often laid on the underside of leaves and a light green in color. They are elliptical in shape and are often deposited in a mass of approximately 28 eggs.
 
 
First Instar.
instars-i-full.jpg
 
Fourth Instar.
instar-iv-full.jpg
 
 
 
 
 
 


Sent from my XT1565 using Tapatalk

#204 nmlarson

nmlarson

    Hot

  • Extreme
  • 786 posts
  • Location:Zone 7a/b, South Central Pennsylvania

Posted 12 August 2018 - 11:31 AM

Yeah, and on top of the stink bugs, my nephew sent me this photo yesterday, from the Easton, PA area.  Spotted Lanternflies.  Another truly destructive non-native pest.

 

spotted lanternfly.jpg

 


Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.        Robert Heinlein


#205 nmlarson

nmlarson

    Hot

  • Extreme
  • 786 posts
  • Location:Zone 7a/b, South Central Pennsylvania

Posted 29 August 2018 - 11:32 AM

Spotted Lanternfly (SLF)

 

A new, destructive, invasive pest.  It's currently been reported in 13 counties in SE Pennsylvania, one county in Virginia and three in New Jersey.  This one was found outside Macungie, PA in Lehigh County.  The PennState Extension is requesting citizens finding the SLF to report it via their website:  https://extension.ps...tted-lanternfly

 

Top view.  Wings and body total about one inch.  Notice the red edge of the bottom wings peeking through to the top:

 

20180827_122258.jpg

 

Bottom view:

 

20180829_111322.jpg


Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.        Robert Heinlein


#206 DontPanic

DontPanic

    Heating Up

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 275 posts
  • Location:Gulf Coast (Zone 8b)

Posted 06 October 2018 - 01:13 PM

Got a nice brood of orange Leaf-footed nymphs.

ePtVkW9.jpg

They nearly always infest my plants when they're fruiting. So I'm reluctant to use any pesticide (even the "organic" ones) on peppers I'm about to harvest.

But I've had good luck just spraying them with soapy water. The soap suds overwhelm their lungs, and they drown. There's usually a few that get away, but they tend to come back to the same spot. So I usually have to repeat the exercise the next day, but on a much smaller brood.

I always wash the soap off the plants with a hose afterwards. If I had the right soap, I wouldn't even need to do that.

#207 nmlarson

nmlarson

    Hot

  • Extreme
  • 786 posts
  • Location:Zone 7a/b, South Central Pennsylvania

Posted 06 October 2018 - 07:16 PM

Yikes! Good thing you know how to deal with them!

Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.        Robert Heinlein


#208 Caranx

Caranx

    Mild

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 36 posts
  • Location:Phuket

Posted 02 January 2019 - 10:36 AM

Anybody know what this is?
Think it or it's friends have laid eggs in my grow the past weeks because I found fresh holes this weekend on the leafs of a neighbouring plant.

20190102_212221.jpg
20190102_211946.jpg

Made me paranoid so took the plant in under the scope and found some dead relics from the last war I won against broadmites. However I didn't know they had support from those bigger brown ones, never seen them before. What are they?

4b7c78597b82ec1da04032bbc1d8257d.0.jpg
9310e7e347724e868e0ed824296aa853.0.jpg




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests