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The Pest Guide

Aphids white fly gnats

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Poll: Broad Mites (47 member(s) have cast votes)

What Threat Level would you rate Broad Mites 1-10? Concider damage, control, prevention, and how annoying.

  1. 4 (3 votes [6.38%])

    Percentage of vote: 6.38%

  2. 5 (1 votes [2.13%])

    Percentage of vote: 2.13%

  3. 6 (6 votes [12.77%])

    Percentage of vote: 12.77%

  4. 7 (9 votes [19.15%])

    Percentage of vote: 19.15%

  5. 8 (12 votes [25.53%])

    Percentage of vote: 25.53%

  6. 9 (16 votes [34.04%])

    Percentage of vote: 34.04%

What Threat Level would you rate Fungus Gnats 1-10? Concider damage, control, prevention, and how annoying.

  1. 1 (5 votes [10.64%])

    Percentage of vote: 10.64%

  2. 2 (6 votes [12.77%])

    Percentage of vote: 12.77%

  3. 3 (11 votes [23.40%])

    Percentage of vote: 23.40%

  4. 4 (7 votes [14.89%])

    Percentage of vote: 14.89%

  5. 5 (7 votes [14.89%])

    Percentage of vote: 14.89%

  6. 6 (2 votes [4.26%])

    Percentage of vote: 4.26%

  7. 7 (2 votes [4.26%])

    Percentage of vote: 4.26%

  8. 8 (7 votes [14.89%])

    Percentage of vote: 14.89%

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#21 John1234

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 12:14 AM

  • Stink Bugs  IMG

Threat level:4 (ID first - non-parasitic and look-a-likes exist)

Location: most moderate climates

Control: pheromone trap, physical trap, removal, insecticidal soap, hot pepper sprays, pyrethroids

Biological Control: Orius insidiosus(Minute Pirate Bugs), Trissolcus spp. (parasitic wasp, exclusive to Asia)

Prevention: Neem oil, garlic/onion spray, companion planting (Mint, Nasturtium, Coriander, Borage, Garlic), weed control, row covers, fall till

Damage caused: pinpricks surrounded by discolouration, rotting lesions, pathogen spread

 

 

It was an interesting read up. A lot of speculation on control (pheromone traps may increase damage, inconclusive study) and hope that the parasitic wasp is fast tracked through USDA red tape. I included pirate bugs because they are generalist predators and somewhat effective, but mostly because... cmon. Pirate bug. What if they said YAAAR every time they devoured eggs.



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#22 Cayennemist

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 01:28 AM

updated

 

stink bugs


"Try not. Do... or do not. There is no try."   ~Yoda


#23 PepperWhisperer

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 08:41 PM

Pest name: Thrips
Threat: 5
Your location: Various species of thrips are present throughout North America
Control: Thrips can be very difficult to control with topical pesticides as they are able to hide in the tiny crevices of new leaves. Pyrethrins will kill on contact.
Biological Control: Predatory mites, predatory thrips, parasitic wasps: note that these predator insects will only attack certain species of thrips, so identification of the problem insect is necessary. Spinosad has been reported as an effective treatment. Neem oil and "narrow range" oils that are canola based have been shown to be moderately effective, but must be reapplied frequently.
Prevention: Removal of nearby overwinter host plants and weeds.
Damage caused: Thrips feed on the newest tender growth. Leaves will be stunted or deformed and will sometimes be hooked.
 
 
Pest name: Root Knot Nematode
Threat: 7
Your location: Worldwide
Control: 
Biological Control: "Solarization" is moderately effective: raised rows of soil are covered with plastic in the summertime. The high soil temperatures kill the nematodes. Several effective biological agents exist including Bacillus megaterium (Bioarc®), Trichoderma album (Biozeid®), Trichoderma harzianum (Plant Gard®) and Ascophyllum nodosum (Algaefol®) but these agents may not be available to the home gardner.
Prevention: Root Knot Nematodes can live on a wide variety of plants including grasses and weed species so prevention can be difficult once the pests are present. 
Damage caused: The nematodes attack the roots of the plant and form galls (knots) on the roots that vary in size depending on the plant species. The root damage impairs the plant's ability to take up water and nutrients. Plants will droop even when there is sufficient soil moisture. Eventually plants will begin to show symptoms of Nitrogen deficiency (yellowing of lower leaves, stunted growth) even though there are sufficient nutrients in the soil.

Edited by PepperWhisperer, 27 April 2014 - 09:03 PM.


#24 Cayennemist

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 10:46 PM

Updated

 

Root Knot Nematode

Thrips

 

And remember, this is never "set in stone." If you have better knowledge jest let me know in a pest report and we can fix it.


"Try not. Do... or do not. There is no try."   ~Yoda


#25 Jeff H

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Posted 28 April 2014 - 11:08 AM

On the topic of deer, I've read many times that deer will shy away from Nightshades since they are slightly poisonous. I've never had a problem with deer eating the pepper plants or peppers themselves so my experience mirrors what I have read. Tomatoes, yes, they will eat the ripe fruit, but not the leaves since tomatoes are nightshades as well.

 

Trampling of the plants can certainly be a problem if they find something else tasty in your garden to eat.


Anything with a strong scent will deter deer as well. Marigolds, sage, lavender, rosemary etc.


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#26 Helvete

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Posted 28 April 2014 - 11:12 AM

On the topic of deer, I've read many times that deer will shy away from Nightshades since they are slightly poisonous. I've never had a problem with deer eating the pepper plants or peppers themselves so my experience mirrors what I have read. Tomatoes, yes, they will eat the ripe fruit, but not the leaves since tomatoes are nightshades as well.
 
Trampling of the plants can certainly be a problem if they find something else tasty in your garden to eat.
Anything with a strong scent will deter deer as well. Marigolds, sage, lavender, rosemary etc.


I fight with them every year over my peppers and tomatoes. They took out almost 20 annuums in last year.

QVIS CVSTODIET IPSOS CVSTODES? -Juvenal The Satires


#27 trevonator

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Posted 28 April 2014 - 09:52 PM

You should also do springtails. A lot of people get very worried when they see them when there is no reason to. They actually indicate healthy soil and live off of decomposing plant matter. Is say threat level is -1.
I like it long, fat, and spicy :cool:

#28 John1234

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Posted 28 April 2014 - 10:02 PM

And remember, this is never "set in stone." If you have better knowledge jest let me know in a pest report and we can fix it.

 

^^That. I forgot to mention if anyone had anything to add/retract to the stink bug, shoot away. I haven't even seen the deadlier ones that are becoming a large problem, let alone tried to deal with them. The brown marmorated sound terrible once established.



#29 Trippa

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 03:43 AM

Broadmites are a harder species to control then spider mite in my experience ... Personally I would put broad mite at a 7-8 rating and I am not sure if the info is correct ... Tanning of leaves, distortion/curling/death of growth tips and young leaves and defoliation would be symptoms/effects ... Not chewed leaves as you won't notice chewed leaves only the effects after they are chewed

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#30 lucilanga

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 04:28 AM

Also, I do not think fungus gnats threat level is about right.

Even indoors, on the current scoring, it's higher than mites or aphids.

You cannot compare broad mites damage or aphids damage with fungus gnats.

And controlling gnats is much more easier/precise than mites, bottom watering, sticky tapes/traps, DE ...

I agree it's a higher threat indoors but still... perhaps the other levels should be raised.


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#31 Pepper-Guru

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 08:32 AM

Awesome PIN! You da MAN!



 

Threat level: 5

Location: Interwebs

Control: Ignore them and they go away, eventually

Biological Control: Don't use computers

Prevention: None

Damage caused: Flame wars, aggravation, spam, and overall drama.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

BUAHAHAHAHHAH! Right?!


The good thing is that most ANY of the pests listed here will ultimately be irradicated by frequent use of AACT foliar spray and soil drenching :)


except for the trolls....I think it just makes them MAD!


Feed the Soil

#32 Cayennemist

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 11:58 AM

The point of this thread is to make a one stop guide to pest control. Without your accumulated knowledge I couldn't do it.

 

Obviously people are going to disagree with one an other, and who am I to say whom is right? So I think when data is challenged maybe we make a poll?

 

Thank you guys for pitching in and helping out. We are going to have a awesome system for control "when/if" this is done.

 

 

 

Also, I do not think fungus gnats threat level is about right.

Even indoors, on the current scoring, it's higher than mites or aphids.

You cannot compare broad mites damage or aphids damage with fungus gnats.

And controlling gnats is much more easier/precise than mites, bottom watering, sticky tapes/traps, DE ...

I agree it's a higher threat indoors but still... perhaps the other levels should be raised.

Fixed

 

 

^^That. I forgot to mention if anyone had anything to add/retract to the stink bug, shoot away. I haven't even seen the deadlier ones that are becoming a large problem, let alone tried to deal with them. The brown marmorated sound terrible once established.

Thanks

 

Broadmites are a harder species to control then spider mite in my experience ... Personally I would put broad mite at a 7-8 rating and I am not sure if the info is correct ... Tanning of leaves, distortion/curling/death of growth tips and young leaves and defoliation would be symptoms/effects ... Not chewed leaves as you won't notice chewed leaves only the effects after they are chewed

Fixed but I still think 6 I will make a poll for it.

 

Awesome PIN! You da MAN!


BUAHAHAHAHHAH! Right?!


The good thing is that most ANY of the pests listed here will ultimately be irradicated by frequent use of AACT foliar spray and soil drenching :)


except for the trolls....I think it just makes them MAD!

Agreed

 

It is hard for me to put control: BT or AZAMAX  But this is going to be a non bias guide. But hey we have Biological Control.


"Try not. Do... or do not. There is no try."   ~Yoda


#33 Jeff H

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 05:49 PM

The good thing is that most ANY of the pests listed here will ultimately be irradicated by frequent use of AACT foliar spray and soil drenching :)


Please explain. Why/how is compost tea going to rid me of mites and white flies?

For Real, in my kitchen!  ...Or if not, then we'll be at Scovie's watching him rub his butt...


#34 Trippa

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 07:32 PM

Please explain. Why/how is compost tea going to rid me of mites and white flies?


Increase the natural resistance of the plants through boosting natural immunity / decrease the likelyhood of plants sending out distress hormones/signals through better plant health reducing the likely hood of pests being attracted to the plants / increasing beneficial bacteria/fungi both in the soil and on leaf surfaces increasing vigour and resistance of plants to attack / increasing beneficial predator populations in the garden by creating a more fertile/dynamic ecosystem with less harmful chemicals needing to be used / increase photosynthesis and brix levels within the plants to further add to immunity levels... That's my take on it ... Rich will probably have more to add... Seaweed extract also has similar benefits when sprayed on foliar areas

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#35 Cayennemist

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 08:02 PM

Please explain. Why/how is compost tea going to rid me of mites and white flies?

 

 

Compost Teas have been know to build up a layer of bio film comprised of beneficial fungi, bacteria, protozoa, and nematodes. These microbes are natures pesticides.

These microbes could be compared to Bacillus thuringiensis (active ingredient in mosquitoes dunks.) However they form on the leaves and only seem to target pests that feed on the leaves like aphids. Unlike BT that kills everything including beneficials.

 

I have tested it and I will say yes it works! but not for snails or caterpillars.


Edited by Cayennemist, 29 April 2014 - 08:03 PM.

"Try not. Do... or do not. There is no try."   ~Yoda


#36 John1234

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 09:43 PM

Although there are nematodes that occur in the phyllosphere (most are parasitic), it is doubtful they would be present in compost nor bred in sugar water. Just to be a nitpicker :D

 

As for pests. Obviously a healthier plant is going to be more disease/pest resistant, but I think you would have difficulty dealing with an established pest population with compost tea alone. I can find a lot of anecdotal claims of this but little actual substance, but perhaps that is just the method of search I am using.


Edited by miguelovic, 29 April 2014 - 09:47 PM.


#37 Cayennemist

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 10:33 PM

Although there are nematodes that occur in the phyllosphere (most are parasitic), it is doubtful they would be present in compost nor bred in sugar water. Just to be a nitpicker :D

 

As for pests. Obviously a healthier plant is going to be more disease/pest resistant, but I think you would have difficulty dealing with an established pest population with compost tea alone. I can find a lot of anecdotal claims of this but little actual substance, but perhaps that is just the method of search I am using.

 

Although there are nematodes that occur in the phyllosphere (most are parasitic), it is doubtful they would be present in compost nor bred in sugar water. Just to be a nitpicker :D

 

As for pests. Obviously a healthier plant is going to be more disease/pest resistant, but I think you would have difficulty dealing with an established pest population with compost tea alone. I can find a lot of anecdotal claims of this but little actual substance, but perhaps that is just the method of search I am using.

 

Or perhaps you should try it and see. As for parasitic nematodes being present, maybe being in an environment supplemented with Tea makes for a good place to thrive?

But yes I see your point.

 

You also have to remember the application helps as well. Spraying with a pump sprayer washes off most insects, and then your leaves are coated afterward.


"Try not. Do... or do not. There is no try."   ~Yoda


#38 Pepper-Guru

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 11:32 PM

Please explain. Why/how is compost tea going to rid me of mites and white flies?

Because the microbes that one colonizes within said aact will seek out protein. Exoskeletons of insects are mainly comprised of protein. Pests = AACT food.
Feed the Soil

#39 John1234

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 11:33 PM

As for parasitic nematodes being present, maybe being in an environment supplemented with Tea makes for a good place to thrive?

 

I mean of the nematodes that live on/in leaf surfaces, most are parasitic. And yes I would assume any healthy nematodes are going to survive/thrive in ideal conditions. As I said, I was nitpicking :D It originally sounded like they come with the tea.

 

 

Or perhaps you should try it and see.

 

I regularily spray and water in compost tea, but I see it as one aspect of preventation and to establish or restore a healthy microbe population. Not as a cure all pest program.

 

I had to deal with three pests I carried here from a previous job, and after an intial spray of SM90, rotated neem/aloe and bonners soap as a knock down/systemic approach, and followed each course with tea. And again, after sterilizing seed starter mix with sm90 and hydrogen peroxide, I reinnoculated with tea and planted seeds, happy that FG larvae wouldn't rape the new starts again.

 

But perhaps I could have just used the tea, it would have been a lot less work. I am leary of silver bullets, and have watched people try to "organic" themselves into crop failure.

 

 

You also have to remember the application helps as well. Spraying with a pump sprayer washes off most insects, and then your leaves are coated afterward.

 

While I was trying, inconclusively, to find research to prove you wrong or right, I was thinking that would be a good test with the aphids out on the rose bush. Though I've read water alone can almost deal with an aphid problem, so a more virulent pest would prove a much better test. Maybe go wander down to the grow store, rub up against the products and catch a little bit of everything.


Edited by miguelovic, 29 April 2014 - 11:40 PM.


#40 Pepper-Guru

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Posted 30 April 2014 - 12:03 AM

When I apply AACT's, aphids die. No anecdote needed.
Organic themselves into crop failure? That sounds like the worst nightmare, I could never imagine.
Not to mention a lot harder to achieve than to "synthetic" oneself into crop failure...

Edited by Pepper-Guru, 30 April 2014 - 12:16 AM.

Feed the Soil




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