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#1 andres

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 03:50 PM

Ok, here's the deal. A couple of days ago, the gardener that works in the offices I work at discovered a huge chiltepe tree. The thing is about 9 feet high in the highest branch. This tree is like no other chiltepe tree I have seen. It is full of life and loaded with tiny fiery black pods that mature to bright orange. Thing is... they want to cut it down because it is obstructing the way to a fuse box. Can you believe that? Do any of you guys know a way that I can transplant this beauty and take it home with me? I really don't want to let it die.

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#2 cmpman1974

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 04:08 PM

Sent you a PM Andres. :)

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#3 fineexampl

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 04:57 PM

gorgeous! looks like the black pearl i'm buying this coming week if it's still there. *crosses fingers*
Die Wahrheit ist irgendwo da draußen
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#4 Donnie

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 05:07 PM

You are absolutely right, why not rescue it?

I would simply cut it back and dig it up trying to get as much with of the roots as possible. Remember that the roots must be able to supply the leaves, so if you think you did not get very much of the roots I would cut it back hardly... This is how I do when I dig up a plant from the ground in fall in order to overwinter it.

#5 willard3

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Posted 05 July 2008 - 10:19 AM

Take a cuitting....read here for cuttings:

http://www.fatalii.n...id=18&Itemid=34

#6 andres

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Posted 05 July 2008 - 12:55 PM

Thank you for all your responses. I think taking a cutting might be a good idea, but I cannot get a hold of rooting hormones in Guatemala. Besides it pains me to think of such a beautiful plant going to waste.

#7 POTAWIE

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Posted 05 July 2008 - 01:05 PM

Do you have willow trees? Make some willow water for natural rooting hormones
Check out my pepper pics and more on Flickr
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#8 talas

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Posted 05 July 2008 - 02:00 PM

Making your own rooting hormone

How to Make Your Own Rooting Hormone

When starting a new plant from a leaf or stem cutting, the cutting will be more likely to form roots and create a new plant if a rooting hormone is used.

While commercial rooting hormone can be used there are organic homemade versions that work as well.

To make rooting hormone, soak the yellow-tipped shoots of a weeping willow tree in water. A tea made from the bark of a willow tree is also effective. When using the shoots or bark, soak them for 24 hours prior to using.[5]

Some people have found that using honey makes an effective rooting hormone as well.

Leaf cuttings: Any plant with leaves such as African Violet, Geranium etc. can be propagated with leaf cuttings. Using a sharp knife, cut off a healthy leaf at the point where it joins the stem. Insert the cut part, called a petiole, into the rooting hormone. Place the end into a small container of light potting soil in which you make a small hole with a pencil.

Making a hole prior to planting assures that the rooting hormone will not be brushed off the cutting when you plant it. Perlite, Vermiculite, and/or water-soaked Sphagnum moss can be added to potting soil to make the soil light. Make sure the leaf is leaning slightly so that the new plants will have plenty of light and not be shaded by the leaf.

Stem cuttings: These are treated just like leaf cuttings except you cut off a stem with several leaves instead of just one leaf. Remove the bottom leaves, leaving a few at the top. Proceed as with the leaf cutting.

In both instances, cover the pot with a plastic bag or inverted glass jar. This will keep moisture from evaporating and keep the cutting from wilting. Keep in a warm location with diffused light but out of direct sunlight. When there is indications of growth after about 3 to 6 weeks, transplant the new emerging plant into a new pot of potting soil. Continue to keep a humid environment for about 2 more weeks until active growth begins.
May the Naga Sauce..Be In You

#9 talas

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Posted 05 July 2008 - 02:02 PM

How to Make Your Own Rooting Hormone

By Marilyn Pokorney


When starting a new plant from a leaf or stem cutting, the cutting will be more likely to form roots and create a new plant if a rooting hormone is used.

While commercial rooting hormone can be used there are organic homemade versions that work as well.

To make rooting hormone soak the yellow-tipped shoots of a weeping willow tree in water. A tea made from the bark of a willow tree is also effective. When using the shoots or bark soak them for 24 hours prior to using.

Some people have found that using honey makes an effective rooting hormone as well.

Leaf cuttings: Any plant with leaves such as African Violet, Geranium etc. can be propagated with leaf cuttings. Using a sharp knife cut off a healthy leaf at the point where it joins the stem. Insert the cut part, called a petiole, into the rooting hormone. Place the end into a small container of light potting soil in which you have made a small hole with a pencil.

Making a hole prior to planting assures that the rooting hormone will not be brushed off the cutting when you plant it. Perlite, Vermiculite, and/or water-soaked Sphagnum moss can be added to potting soil to make the soil light. Make sure the leaf is leaning slightly so that the new plants will have plenty of light and not be shaded by the leaf.

Stem cuttings: These are treated just like leaf cuttings except you cut off a stem with several leaves instead of just one leaf. Remove the bottom leaves, leaving a few at the top. Proceed as with the leaf cutting.




In both instances cover the pot with a plastic bag or inverted glass jar. This will keep moisture from evaporating and keep the cutting from wilting. Keep in a warm location with diffused light but out of direct sunlight. When there is indications of growth after about 3 to 6 weeks, transplant the new emerging plant into a new pot of potting soil. Continue to keep a humid environment for about 2 more weeks until active growth begins.

More organic gardening tips and supplies can be found at: http://www.apluswrit...ardensalive.htm
May the Naga Sauce..Be In You

#10 chilehunter

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Posted 05 July 2008 - 03:34 PM

they want to cut it down because it is obstructing the way to a fuse box.


yea I can see they're all concerned about being able to get to the fuse box if they ever need to ;):lol::rolleyes:



gorgeous! looks like the black pearl i'm buying this coming week if it's still there. *crosses fingers*



black pearls dont look like this plant

#11 chilehunter

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Posted 05 July 2008 - 03:37 PM

ask them to just cut the branch thats infront of the box & leave the plant live, so you can have fresh chiles while at work & tell them you'll prune it & make sure the plant stays clear of the fuse box from now on.

#12 LUCKYDOG

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Posted 05 July 2008 - 05:35 PM

have you tried any of the peppers? if there are any ripe ones I'll gladly transplant them here ;) Beautiful plant BTW

#13 pablo

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Posted 05 July 2008 - 06:39 PM

[quote name='Donnie']You are absolutely right, why not rescue it?

I would simply cut it back and dig it up trying to get as much of the roots as possible. QUOTE]
I agree on this.
and take a cutting too.
these plants do well under fluroescent lights,and should survive the transplant.

pablo

#14 theHippySeedCo

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Posted 06 July 2008 - 09:24 AM

Some String and 10 min of your lunch break, go outside it looks semi vine like and get the main branch thats going towards the fusebox and move it round and tie to 1 of thse bars near where the Vine is growing, its Looks Beautiful and if was tied up in a few Places up the pole, would look outstanding when the chilli's change, plus stay out of the way of the fuse box..

It would Live YAY, look great the chilli's could ripen and a few seeds could be gotten ;)

ask if it can live


peace
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#15 theHippySeedCo

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Posted 06 July 2008 - 09:32 AM

And if they say No.. try get some capsicum spray and 1 Friday arvo Spray the Toilet Paper rolls in the office toilets with it so it drys by monday

call it Capsicum Karma

(One of the fun things i could do if i was allowed capsicum spray :) )

Edited by theHippySeedCo, 06 July 2008 - 09:33 AM.
dunno, i forget now

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#16 pepperfever

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Posted 06 July 2008 - 12:35 PM

Andres, did you get to save the tree? That's a beauty and I hope you can tie it back out of the way as well as get a cutting so it can be moved to a safer location. Good luck.

Jackie

#17 chilehunter

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Posted 06 July 2008 - 01:50 PM

And if they say No.. try get some capsicum spray and 1 Friday arvo Spray the Toilet Paper rolls in the office toilets with it so it drys by monday

call it Capsicum Karma

(One of the fun things i could do if i was allowed capsicum spray )



thats funny but wouldnt work because of the color from mace, but now if ya still would like to do that to someone
I'd be getting some "cajohns frost" hot sauce (I think he's the maker ?)since its a clear hot sauce & one heck of a hot sauce (is it not 1 million SHU ?)
put that sauce into a little spray bottle & mist the toilet paper (TP), you wouldnt want to pour it on the TP because most people would just unroll the water damaged looking TP to get to the undamaged part. & since its in the 1 million SHU range or close enough a little mist can go along ways :lol::hell:

& if ya want you could unroll some of it & mist it then roll it back up nicely :hell:
not that I'd ever think about doing this to some people :whistle:

#18 ABurningMouth

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Posted 06 July 2008 - 01:56 PM

Yeah tie it to the bars. no big deal.
Nice looking plant.

#19 andres

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Posted 07 July 2008 - 09:19 AM

I have managed a stay of execution for the next month. When they finish our new offices I will take it with me for sure. The pods taste just like a regular chiltepe... maybe a bit more pungent. I will wait for the pods to ripen and try to get some seed

#20 cmpman1974

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Posted 07 July 2008 - 08:21 PM

That's great news. The fact it ripens orange really intrigues me!

Chris




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