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Various question for the experts in hybridization

Hybrids Growing Cross Phenos

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#1 Kyle Reese Contreras

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 03:47 AM

So, I have really started to dig into cross pollinating my peppers.
I know that no one as mapped the Capisum Genome or anything like that. (Someone should!!) But has anyone crossed a pepper with enough predictability to atleast partially know what may come out. Whether it's ballpark Capsacinoids, or shape, dominant color.

Recently, I crossed a Golden Cayenne with a Chocolate Cherry Bomb. I have the seedling of the next generation started and I am excited to see if it took and what the pods will look like. I have plenty of odd ball f-2 and f-3 crosses sent to me from fellow Chilli enthusiast. And someone purchased the Brazailian Ghost x Reaper from John Ford for me. Still don't know who haha thank you mystery gifter!

Anyway, if I were to cross the golden cayenne with a wide variety of capsicum species and varieties. Think it would be possible I would be able to guess atleast with some accuracy the outcomes? Maybe not all but some?
The golden cayenne is just used in that example because I crossed one recently haha

I know a little all over the place haha anyone got any examples of neat crosses is free to post photos as well haha
Nothing wrong with being meticulous

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#2 Helvete

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 06:02 AM

It's not 100% predictable, but you can look at the odds of characterizations by figuring out which genes are dominant and recessive by using a punnet square.  In almost all cases (there are exceptions because mother nature is a weird one) the dominant genes for peppers are the darker color and spicy.  If you cross a yellow pepper and a red pepper it is highly likely, almost certain to have a red pepper in the F1, but because the F1 is heterozygous you will only have a 25% chance of receiving a yellow strain in the F2.  Even when you isolate a flower, if it has heterozygous genes it can be unpredictable.  There are also other factors that can alter the chances like which flower is male/female etc.  I don't think hybridization is an exact science, nor will it be unless you are crossbreeding on a genetic level.

 

also, interspecific hybrids can be tricky, there are chances that the F1 will be sterile or that the genes won't merge at all during the initial cross.


Edited by ikeepfish, 13 January 2015 - 06:05 AM.

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#3 Orekoc

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 06:17 AM

It's not 100% predictable, but you can look at the odds of characterizations by figuring out which genes are dominant and recessive by using a punnet square.  In almost all cases (there are exceptions because mother nature is a weird one) the dominant genes for peppers are the darker color and spicy.  If you cross a yellow pepper and a red pepper it is highly likely, almost certain to have a red pepper in the F1, but because the F1 is heterozygous you will only have a 25% chance of receiving a yellow strain in the F2.  Even when you isolate a flower, if it has heterozygous genes it can be unpredictable.  There are also other factors that can alter the chances like which flower is male/female etc.  I don't think hybridization is an exact science, nor will it be unless you are crossbreeding on a genetic level.

 

also, interspecific hybrids can be tricky, there are chances that the F1 will be sterile or that the genes won't merge at all during the initial cross.

Plus there are polygenetic traits. Things that are thought of as a gene, but are in fact multiple genes need for the trait to show. Eye color in humans is an example. Brown is dominate over blue. But if you are heterozygous for eye color, the blue color actually  lays down first, with the brown color on top of it. Some times there is a problem, and the brown doesn't get produced in one eye, giving a brown eye and a blue eye child. Also, the colors lay down in spikes and the density of the spikes is another gene, so if there aren't very many spikes then you get green eyes. Or a green eye and a blue eye. Then there are genes determining how consistent the color spikes are, producing eyes with one color at the edge of the eye, change to a different color at the center of the eye.

 

This kinda stuff happens with plants too. Semi dominate genes. Don't even get me started on feather color genes in chickens. Without knowing the genotype of the exact two plants crossed, you won't have any idea what the results will be.

 

Heck, scientists are discovering (have discovered) that there are genes that determine which genes actually turn on or off.

 

I think we have been cursed with the ancient Chinese curse, "May you live in interesting times."


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#4 Kyle Reese Contreras

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 08:42 AM

I really like those answers actually.
And I touched on genetics in biology my freshman year(college) I believe it was. I wasn't sure if plants just happened to be more predictable. It was a hope I suppose haha
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#5 Orekoc

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 11:40 PM

I really like those answers actually.
And I touched on genetics in biology my freshman year(college) I believe it was. I wasn't sure if plants just happened to be more predictable. It was a hope I suppose haha

Mendel was very lucky he choose peas to work with. The traits he was looking at had were governed by simply inheritance rules.


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#6 Kyle Reese Contreras

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Posted 14 January 2015 - 02:13 AM

Imagine if he used peppers:O
Mendal's inherance would never have came to fruition!!!
Nothing wrong with being meticulous





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