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Some Issues with leaves.

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Best Answer DMF, 06 October 2015 - 11:08 PM

Bugs aren't the problem. 

 

Based on this and your other thread, I believe you have a problem with nutrient mobility.  The nutrients are there but the plant can't use them. There are several possible causes - high soil pH, overwatering, damaged roots from over-fertilizing (which I'm sure you did earlier) or poor drainage. 

 

Pictures 2-4 are classic calcium (and/or magnesium) deficiency (difficult to tell the difference).  Pic 1 could be Ca or Fe. Pic 5 doesn't fit any of the typical deficiency diagnoses (intra- not inter-veinal chlorosis), but I had some just like it this year that was cured by correcting the soil pH (it was too high due to this alkaline water). 

 

Things to look at:

* find out the pH of your water.  If it's much higher than 7.5 you will have to treat it.

* think seriously how and how much you water your plants.  Have you ever seen them wilt?  It should happen regularly.

* stop throwing epsom salts at the plants

  - foliar spray is not an effective delivery mechanism with peppers

  - the problem is not lack of magnesium but the ability of the plant to use it

  - epsom salt doesn't contain Ca, which I think is more likely your problem

* work on your container soil for next year; this is a deep topic and will take some research

* find out the assay of the fertilizers that are available to you.  The strengths and ratios of the major nutrients (nitrogen N, phosphorus P, potassium K) are usually expressed somewhere on the packaging as a series of numbers, e.g. "3-1-2".  If you don't know that it's hard to fertilize intelligently.

 

In Georgia growing peppers isn't nearly as easy as it is for us.  But we all have a lousy first year.  So far your's isn't bad.  You have plants and at least some pods.  And now you know some of the things that you need to learn. 

 

Good luck, and keep asking questions.

 

Dennis

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#1 Turrbow

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Posted 28 July 2015 - 04:54 AM

Hi All!

 

This is my first post here and first attempt on growing hots.

 

I wanted to show you some strange things, that happen to my plant leaves.

It would be nice if you could provide any info on what am I doing wrong...

Sorry for bad quality photos and thanks in advance...

 

1) Yellow Leaves

on some plants new leaves are strange yellow color.

IMG_20150727_190445.jpg

 

 

2) Curly New Leaves

IMG_20150727_190542.jpg

 

 

3) Cut Leaves

I am pretty sure I did not cut them myself

IMG_20150727_190627.jpg

 

 

4) Curly Edges

This one is Carolina Reaper

IMG_20150727_190648.jpg

 

5) Yellow lines like this:

this one is from another CR

IMG_20150727_190702.jpg

 



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#2 moruga welder

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Posted 28 July 2015 - 05:29 AM

:welcome: to T.H.P. !      :onfire:



#3 romy6

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Posted 28 July 2015 - 07:34 AM

 I am gonna say too much water . Roots are unable to dry out and breath . Oh and welcome aboard !!! 


Jamie :cheers:

#4 Topsmoke

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Posted 15 September 2015 - 10:01 PM

Yikes! thems some unhappy campers!  At first glance I would say over water but I noticed the soil looks bone dry but I see some white stuff on top of your soil.  Unless you're top dressing with azomite or some other rock dust Im going to say thats salinization from either over fertilization or extremeley hard water.  The leaf damage could be a direct result of too much salt bulid up or its unable to take up micro nutrients because of excessive nitrogen or sodium.  Try flushing the soil with distilled water and maybe even repotting.



#5 Turrbow

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Posted 06 October 2015 - 04:31 AM

Thank you all!
 

Topsmoke

I suppose you are right with the "hard water" as I didint use any fertilizer on sprouts and I remember those white stuff even back then. Thanks!



#6 sevenstrings

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Posted 06 October 2015 - 10:13 AM

I may be wrong but is that soil from the ground or just topsoil? It looks super dense and I see some mud on the inside of the pot. Generally potting mixes dont really make mud.

#7 Dave2000

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Posted 06 October 2015 - 11:53 AM

Looks like you're using soil that's already been depleted of nutrients, except the cutting is a leaf cutter or beetle, etc... whatever insects are indigenous to your region.

#8 Turrbow

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Posted 06 October 2015 - 12:48 PM

I may be wrong but is that soil from the ground or just topsoil? It looks super dense and I see some mud on the inside of the pot. Generally potting mixes dont really make mud.

Where I live, we don't have any potting mixes, sadly :) I bought this soil from some garden shop just because it looked better than my yard soil. 

 

 

Looks like you're using soil that's already been depleted of nutrients, except the cutting is a leaf cutter or beetle, etc... whatever insects are indigenous to your region.

I suppose you are right about the soil. And about the beetle too. I saw some tiny red bugs here and there on some plants, maybe they are the problem. Thanks!



#9 DMF

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Posted 06 October 2015 - 11:08 PM   Best Answer

Bugs aren't the problem. 

 

Based on this and your other thread, I believe you have a problem with nutrient mobility.  The nutrients are there but the plant can't use them. There are several possible causes - high soil pH, overwatering, damaged roots from over-fertilizing (which I'm sure you did earlier) or poor drainage. 

 

Pictures 2-4 are classic calcium (and/or magnesium) deficiency (difficult to tell the difference).  Pic 1 could be Ca or Fe. Pic 5 doesn't fit any of the typical deficiency diagnoses (intra- not inter-veinal chlorosis), but I had some just like it this year that was cured by correcting the soil pH (it was too high due to this alkaline water). 

 

Things to look at:

* find out the pH of your water.  If it's much higher than 7.5 you will have to treat it.

* think seriously how and how much you water your plants.  Have you ever seen them wilt?  It should happen regularly.

* stop throwing epsom salts at the plants

  - foliar spray is not an effective delivery mechanism with peppers

  - the problem is not lack of magnesium but the ability of the plant to use it

  - epsom salt doesn't contain Ca, which I think is more likely your problem

* work on your container soil for next year; this is a deep topic and will take some research

* find out the assay of the fertilizers that are available to you.  The strengths and ratios of the major nutrients (nitrogen N, phosphorus P, potassium K) are usually expressed somewhere on the packaging as a series of numbers, e.g. "3-1-2".  If you don't know that it's hard to fertilize intelligently.

 

In Georgia growing peppers isn't nearly as easy as it is for us.  But we all have a lousy first year.  So far your's isn't bad.  You have plants and at least some pods.  And now you know some of the things that you need to learn. 

 

Good luck, and keep asking questions.

 

Dennis


Edited by DMF, 06 October 2015 - 11:13 PM.

"Stupidity got us into this mess.  Why can't it get us out?"    - Will Rogers


#10 FROG DOG

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Posted 07 October 2015 - 12:30 AM

:welcome: for startin plants i usually use the KISS method which works pretty well. Little NPK and CalMAg after a couple true sets of leaves water once a day till moist but not drenched. good luck!!



#11 Turrbow

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Posted 07 October 2015 - 02:11 AM

Bugs aren't the problem. 

 

Based on this and your other thread, I believe you have a problem with nutrient mobility.  The nutrients are there but the plant can't use them. There are several possible causes - high soil pH, overwatering, damaged roots from over-fertilizing (which I'm sure you did earlier) or poor drainage. 

 

Pictures 2-4 are classic calcium (and/or magnesium) deficiency (difficult to tell the difference).  Pic 1 could be Ca or Fe. Pic 5 doesn't fit any of the typical deficiency diagnoses (intra- not inter-veinal chlorosis), but I had some just like it this year that was cured by correcting the soil pH (it was too high due to this alkaline water). 

 

Things to look at:

* find out the pH of your water.  If it's much higher than 7.5 you will have to treat it.

* think seriously how and how much you water your plants.  Have you ever seen them wilt?  It should happen regularly.

* stop throwing epsom salts at the plants

  - foliar spray is not an effective delivery mechanism with peppers

  - the problem is not lack of magnesium but the ability of the plant to use it

  - epsom salt doesn't contain Ca, which I think is more likely your problem

* work on your container soil for next year; this is a deep topic and will take some research

* find out the assay of the fertilizers that are available to you.  The strengths and ratios of the major nutrients (nitrogen N, phosphorus P, potassium K) are usually expressed somewhere on the packaging as a series of numbers, e.g. "3-1-2".  If you don't know that it's hard to fertilize intelligently.

 

In Georgia growing peppers isn't nearly as easy as it is for us.  But we all have a lousy first year.  So far your's isn't bad.  You have plants and at least some pods.  And now you know some of the things that you need to learn. 

 

Good luck, and keep asking questions.

 

Dennis

 

Thanks a lot for advices. Will certainly keep in mind for the next year.

 

 

:welcome: for startin plants i usually use the KISS method which works pretty well. Little NPK and CalMAg after a couple true sets of leaves water once a day till moist but not drenched. good luck!!

Thanks. Actually KISS worked pretty well on one of my plants, which I transplanted directly to garden, in another town though. watering them from time to time was maximum care I did for it. Now the plant looks healthy, bushy and grows symmetrically, unlike my potted ones.



#12 Topsmoke

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Posted 07 October 2015 - 05:56 PM

Bugs aren't the problem. 

 

Based on this and your other thread, I believe you have a problem with nutrient mobility.  The nutrients are there but the plant can't use them. There are several possible causes - high soil pH, overwatering, damaged roots from over-fertilizing (which I'm sure you did earlier) or poor drainage. 

 

Pictures 2-4 are classic calcium (and/or magnesium) deficiency (difficult to tell the difference).  Pic 1 could be Ca or Fe. Pic 5 doesn't fit any of the typical deficiency diagnoses (intra- not inter-veinal chlorosis), but I had some just like it this year that was cured by correcting the soil pH (it was too high due to this alkaline water). 

 

Things to look at:

* find out the pH of your water.  If it's much higher than 7.5 you will have to treat it.

* think seriously how and how much you water your plants.  Have you ever seen them wilt?  It should happen regularly.

* stop throwing epsom salts at the plants

  - foliar spray is not an effective delivery mechanism with peppers

  - the problem is not lack of magnesium but the ability of the plant to use it

  - epsom salt doesn't contain Ca, which I think is more likely your problem

* work on your container soil for next year; this is a deep topic and will take some research

* find out the assay of the fertilizers that are available to you.  The strengths and ratios of the major nutrients (nitrogen N, phosphorus P, potassium K) are usually expressed somewhere on the packaging as a series of numbers, e.g. "3-1-2".  If you don't know that it's hard to fertilize intelligently.

 

In Georgia growing peppers isn't nearly as easy as it is for us.  But we all have a lousy first year.  So far your's isn't bad.  You have plants and at least some pods.  And now you know some of the things that you need to learn. 

 

Good luck, and keep asking questions.

 

Dennis

why would you ever want to see your plants wilt?  wilting is a sign of trauma you should never let your plants wilt.  plants will neither wilt nor droop when properly hydrated. i also dont understand why you think peppers would do better in texas over georgia.  Georgia has a subtropic humid climate ideal for peppers.  i live in southern PA zone 6b and its great for peppers.  peppers come from the tropics not the desert!


Edited by Topsmoke, 07 October 2015 - 05:57 PM.


#13 sevenstrings

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Posted 07 October 2015 - 06:55 PM

Throw 90+ dergrees in full sun and they will droop no matter how hydrated!! ;-)

#14 DMF

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Posted 09 October 2015 - 04:07 PM

 

why would you ever want to see your plants wilt?

 

Because then you know that you're not overwatering.  Let them wilt and you will quickly get the rhythm of their requirements.  About the worst thing you can do is water on some schedule based on a guess rather than based on what the plants actually need.  "The primary killer of container plants is kindness."

 

 

i also dont understand why you think peppers would do better in texas over georgia.

 

Tblisi is in THE COUNTRY of Georgia.  Tblisi might have a great climate for peppers too (I don't really know) but my comment was based on the OP's statement that it's difficult to get growers supplies there.

 

You may be right that the State of Georgia is better for peppers than Texas.  I certainly had better results growing there than I have had these last two years.

 

BTW, visit some Texas some day.  You will quickly find that only the far west is desert.  And we don't have lynchings or gunfights in the dusty streets.


"Stupidity got us into this mess.  Why can't it get us out?"    - Will Rogers






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