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#21 Buzzman19

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 01:48 PM

 

Please don't take this as criticism or condescending, self-serving "illumination"…I mean this in the kindest, friendliest way, as a fellow chile head who has been disappointed by his experience with the classic, true Aji Amarillo.

 

Aji Amarillo predates even the Inca Civilization by thousands of years. Images of its plants have been found on jars dating back to long before the great structures at Machu Picchu were built. What we have today is the result of selection for more generations than we can imagine. The ancient breeders of this pepper knew what they were doing, and I don't think they were selecting for poor production...It is unfortunate when one attempts to grow a prized thousands-years-old-landrace far from its established home, in soil and climatic conditions far different from its homeland, and then characterizes it as "one of the less productive baccatums." I had the very same experience as everyone else here: Aji Amarillo wouldn't perform for me, but it wasn't the fault of the pepper, it was my fault for attempting to make it produce in a place that was not the Andes. Check out what Aji Amarillo can do in its happy home:

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=0r6Pxw-v_d0

 

Arrrrg…If anyone can tell me how to embed a YouTube video in a THP post, please hollah…Otherwise, you got the above link to a great vid of a huge Aji Amarillo harvest in Peru...

 

 

Thats pretty impressive, I finally get to see Amarillo in their native land and they look magnificent.  Sorry if my rant came off as blasting the pepper because of poor production, as you have explained I realize not all peppers will perform like they would if they were grown in their native climate. 

 

I probably wont grow Amarillo again, if I had more room and a way to over winter the plants I would.  I can buy Amarillo paste at my local Thai store for approx $3 a jar.  So its why I gave up on growing them, the flavor of the pepper speaks for itself. 

 

cheers



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#22 Geonerd

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 02:00 PM

 

Please don't take this as criticism or condescending, self-serving "illumination"…I mean this in the kindest, friendliest way, as a fellow chile head who has been disappointed by his experience with the classic, true Aji Amarillo.

 

Aji Amarillo predates even the Inca Civilization by thousands of years. Images of its plants have been found on jars dating back to long before the great structures at Machu Picchu were built. What we have today is the result of selection for more generations than we can imagine. The ancient breeders of this pepper knew what they were doing, and I don't think they were selecting for poor production...It is unfortunate when one attempts to grow a prized thousands-years-old-landrace far from its established home, in soil and climatic conditions far different from its homeland, and then characterizes it as "one of the less productive baccatums." I had the very same experience as everyone else here: Aji Amarillo wouldn't perform for me, but it wasn't the fault of the pepper, it was my fault for attempting to make it produce in a place that was not the Andes. Check out what Aji Amarillo can do in its happy home:

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=0r6Pxw-v_d0

 

Arrrrg…If anyone can tell me how to embed a YouTube video in a THP post, please hollah…Otherwise, you got the above link to a great vid of a huge Aji Amarillo harvest in Peru...

 

Heck, I'm amazed ANYTHING can grow in Southern Aridzona.  The summer heat stunts the plant's growth, and stops many varieties from flowering at all until late August or September.  If the season didn't extend well into November and beyond, trying to grow peppers here would be a futile undertaking.

 

I did qualify my statement with a mention of the state, and I think most people here are aware of the climatic challenges their plants face.


:fireball:


#23 windchicken

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 03:28 PM

 

 

Thats pretty impressive, I finally get to see Amarillo in their native land and they look magnificent.  Sorry if my rant came off as blasting the pepper because of poor production, as you have explained I realize not all peppers will perform like they would if they were grown in their native climate. 

 

I probably wont grow Amarillo again, if I had more room and a way to over winter the plants I would.  I can buy Amarillo paste at my local Thai store for approx $3 a jar.  So its why I gave up on growing them, the flavor of the pepper speaks for itself. 

 

cheers

 

I never get tired of that video…Thanks for watching

 

I never heard the "rant" tone in anyone's comments here, Buzz….frustration, maybe, which is certainly understandable.

 

I won't grow Aji Amarillo again, either, at least not the classic, large pod variant. It's just not worth the trouble. It would be so awesome to have fresh plants loaded with those massive pods like that woman is holding, though... :P

 

 

Heck, I'm amazed ANYTHING can grow in Southern Aridzona.  The summer heat stunts the plant's growth, and stops many varieties from flowering at all until late August or September.  If the season didn't extend well into November and beyond, trying to grow peppers here would be a futile undertaking.

 

I did qualify my statement with a mention of the state, and I think most people here are aware of the climatic challenges their plants face.

 

Thanks for your patience with me, Geonerd…When I read back over my post, it sounds a little condescending and preachy, despite my (apparently unsuccessful) intentions of not doing that…And I'm sorry I didn't catch your qualification.

 

Here in NW Louisiana, at least in my particular micro-climate, there is very little to zero fruit set from August 1 through October 1. (This year has been the particular exception, as we have had two cool snaps in the last few weeks, and my plants are beginning to load up finally.) So yes, I hear ya! Basically my entire harvest happens in November...



#24 hot stuff

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 09:55 AM

Here in NW Louisiana, at least in my particular micro-climate, there is very little to zero fruit set from August 1 through October 1. (This year has been the particular exception, as we have had two cool snaps in the last few weeks, and my plants are beginning to load up finally.) So yes, I hear ya! Basically my entire harvest happens in November...

Know the feeling. While my aji cito, ethiopian fire, cumari do paro, and aji pineapple have been ripening steadily all my superhots, my aji amarillo, charleston hot etc. are just sitting there waiting to ripen or just putting on pods in Missouri.


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#25 windchicken

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 11:15 AM

Know the feeling. While my aji cito, ethiopian fire, cumari do paro, and aji pineapple have been ripening steadily all my superhots, my aji amarillo, charleston hot etc. are just sitting there waiting to ripen or just putting on pods in Missouri.

 

I love me some Cumari do Para, as do everyone I have ever shared them with. The little bird peppers are the only ones that don't seem to mind the blast furnace of my garden during July-September. Thanks for reminding me of Cumari do Para; I need to start back growing it…It's interesting that your Aji Pineapple continues to produce through the hot weather, too. Maybe I need to try that one...

 

This is one of my ten Texas Pequin plants back in August, in the very worst heat of the summer. If they weren't such a pain to harvest I would just grow them exclusively:

 

pequin_aug12.jpg



#26 dragonsfire

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 12:06 PM

Nice postcard picture :)



#27 shadrack

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 07:19 AM

This is my first year growing Amarillo's.  Take FOREVER to ripen, so much so that I've been harvesting pubes and rotocos for two weeks but am just now getting Amarillos ripe enough to pick.  :confused:



#28 windchicken

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 10:23 AM

Nice postcard picture :)

 

Thanks DF!

 

This is my first year growing Amarillo's.  Take FOREVER to ripen, so much so that I've been harvesting pubes and rotocos for two weeks but am just now getting Amarillos ripe enough to pick.  :confused:

 

The large-pod Aji Amarillo, in my experience, is THE fussiest of all pepper varieties, no exceptions. To get ripe pods in the same year you sowed seeds is an amazing feat!  :dance:



#29 romy6

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 11:52 AM

Well damn I sure feel lucky then . Had pods within 90 days of sowing . Took 90 more to ripen though :)

 

17158980352_abfc824f47_b.jpgphoto.JPG by James Hill, on Flickr

 

 

17324521632_6f39d12b5d_b.jpgIMG_3513.JPG by James Hill, on Flickr

 

 

18689722611_0f8a9d4495_b.jpgIMG_3905.JPG by James Hill, on Flickr

 

18253499334_16a889b22c_b.jpgIMG_3947.JPG by James Hill, on Flickr

 

18688378488_86f3ca91e7_b.jpgIMG_3949.JPG by James Hill, on Flickr

 

20439794455_715be4f581_b.jpgIMG_4414.JPG by James Hill, on Flickr

 

 I do agree with Gary though not a very big  productive plant but I am still getting fruit set even in my harsh conditions. I would like to recommend the large orange thai for those of you that live in an environment like mine hot and humid . As you can see from the last pic much better producer and almost the same great flavor with a little more heat :)  Top left next to the aji's . 


Jamie :cheers:

#30 synclinorium

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 08:57 AM

romy, yours look a little different than mine do. Pods on mine are more elongate and aren't as smooth and glossy.

This year is going to be a bust as well, we just had a storm blow through and it wrecked the Amarillo. Oh well. I'll overwinter it one more year but I just don't think I'm going to get it to produce this far north.



#31 CraigJS

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Posted 25 September 2015 - 07:44 PM

Aji Amirillo are great green used on sandwiches and cut up on salads. Had to use my unripe pods some how. Won't grow them again here in Minnesota. Starters inside in March, they put out pods like crazy. Never ripened.

#32 swellcat

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 05:56 AM

Much like Pavlov's dogs, I started salivating at the sight of the Peruvian pile of ripe Ají Amarillo.  And they're growing them to the size of baby arms?

 

The discussion is informative.  My results with this variety have mirrored those of many others in the thread.

 

Does anyone know at what elevations and in which climatic conditions these pods are most successfully grown? 



#33 Thegreenchilemonster

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 06:18 AM

Aji amarillo seems to love my backyard, here in NOVA😁

On a serious note, though. Here is a pic of the regions in Peru where it is cultivated. The orange dots on the map are aji amarillo cultivation zones.

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#34 swellcat

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 06:59 AM

Thanks for that.

 

Looks like it's almost all about the coast for Peruvian Ají Amarillo.  Seems to be a Goldilocks zone: mild, never freezes, perpetual Spring, (albeit a dry one).  No wonder they produce pods like mad. 

 

(All of the guajillo pods I see in Hispanic-oriented grocery stores in my area are also from Peru.)



#35 Spicy Mushroom

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 11:14 PM

I grew it once many years ago along side 23 other pepper varieties (chinense and baccatums). Do not recall seed source.

 

Mine grew fairly large and was rather lanky. It would have really benefited with cage/stakes. Of all the varieties that year, my Aji Amarillo and Giant Mexican Rocoto were the last to produce fruit. I think I got 2 ripe pods off the Amarillo and 1 off the rocoto lol. My other baccatums produced like mad in the same bed (including aji limon, aji omnicolor, bishops crown, etc). The amarillo had a few green pods but it was about to enter winter at that time and didn't bother.

 

I will say this though, it's my favorite baccatum in terms of flavor so far! If I ever grow it again I will start it much earlier and uppot it beyond my usual red party cups.


Edited by Spicy Mushroom, 14 June 2018 - 11:31 PM.


#36 ShowMeDaSauce

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Posted 15 June 2018 - 11:04 AM

Ive wanted to try a Aji Amarillo for the last couple of years but the thought of a nice big plant with lots of green pods at the end of the season just dont cut it for me. I get a bunch of lemon drops that dont make it in time but i also get about 5 times as many ripe ones starting as early as mid July.

 

Im taking a chance with rocotos this year just because they are such a neat looking plant with different flavor than a baccatum. I went with Brazilian Starfish this year as my only baccatum and i already have some nice sized pods on it.



#37 swellcat

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Posted 15 June 2018 - 01:58 PM

Poor substitute for fresh, but . . .

 

no8vx2.jpg

 

2rw6po7.jpg

 

9j3lz4.jpg.

 

They were $4-5 a pound bag, frozen.

 



#38 Spicy Mushroom

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Posted 15 June 2018 - 03:49 PM

Im taking a chance with rocotos this year just because they are such a neat looking plant with different flavor than a baccatum. I went with Brazilian Starfish this year as my only baccatum and i already have some nice sized pods on it.

 

 

I would approach Pubescens and Aji Amarillo the same way. Go in with the mentality that you're growing for 2nd year plants. My 'Turbo Pupe' didn't produce any ripe pods for my the 1st year, despite starting them from seed in December indoors. Now in its second year the plant is fairly large and is loaded with an insane amount of blooms (whether they will set fruit is another beast ugh). I think i'll start an Aji Amarillo indoors soon and just let hang out until the 2nd year for production (it's just so good). Mind you i'm not a a big fan of baccatums thus far. Amarillo and Omnicolor are the only ones that i'd grow again. Sugar Rush Peach and Aji Fantasy are in my '19 grow... hoping those will become my new baccatum favorites.

 

Which rocoto are you growing? I grew the Giant Mexican Rocoto from PL many years ago and its flavor was friggin' stellar, but I had terrible production 1st year.



#39 ShowMeDaSauce

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Posted 16 June 2018 - 01:13 PM

Im growing Miraflores market rocoto. I assume TGCM got them from the market. Im also growing Peruvian mini red rocoto.






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