Jump to content

  •  

Photo

Who Tops Their Peppers?

Topping Pruning Fiming Trimming

  • Please log in to reply
61 replies to this topic

#21 NeedsWork

NeedsWork

    Hot

  • Extreme
  • 593 posts
  • Location:Indiana - zone 5b

Posted 03 February 2016 - 10:56 PM

I topped all of mine at least twice last year and was happy with the results.  I like growing bushes, not trees.   ;)   

 

DSC_0011_zpshy6bfwbh.jpg



#22 SvtCobra

SvtCobra

    Heating Up

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 294 posts
  • Location:San Jose

Posted 04 February 2016 - 03:21 AM

I topped all of mine at least twice last year and was happy with the results.  I like growing bushes, not trees.   ;)   

 

DSC_0011_zpshy6bfwbh.jpg

Very Nice!


Grow enough plants and some of them will top themselves, lol

 

I always end up with some plants topped, though not by choice..dogs, wind, pests...something always happens to at least some of them!

Same happens to me. Mostly children and wind.



#23 Thegreenchilemonster

Thegreenchilemonster

    On Fire!

  • Extreme
  • 7,360 posts

Posted 04 February 2016 - 09:55 AM

I top all of my plants. I like having solid lower branches and trunks on my plants, so I don't have to worry about wind and other environmental factors.

Baccatums seem to rebound the fastest from a good topping/pruning. Pubescens take a lot longer to recover from a topping in my experience, I still do it, but I expect an extra 3 weeks or so of recovery time compared to Baccatums and Chinense.

#24 Lovepeppers

Lovepeppers

    Hot

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 917 posts
  • Location:Rialto, Southern California

Posted 04 February 2016 - 10:27 AM

I've done some LST on some pepper plants. It works well.

#25 Geonerd

Geonerd

    Smokin' Hot

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,684 posts
  • Location:Aridzona, Republic of Redneckistan.

Posted 04 February 2016 - 01:16 PM

Never felt the need.  Let them grow; even the occasional 'bean stalk' plant will branch out eventually.   Your plants have had millions of years to practice and they DO tend to 'know what they are doing!'  Humans and their control-freak neuroses are neither required nor, I suspect, appreciated.  

 

That said, I could see doing a light 'FIM' as an experiment and to encourage branching.

 

But to whack half the plant off, or (shudder) strip the big, resource intensive, main leaves is just punishing the the plant's efforts.


:fireball:


#26 az1000

az1000

    Hot

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 618 posts
  • Location:Romania

Posted 04 February 2016 - 02:44 PM

I tried once and I don't was happy with the results.
Now I let them to do what they want.
I trim occasionally some older leaves and branches but that's all.

#27 Thegreenchilemonster

Thegreenchilemonster

    On Fire!

  • Extreme
  • 7,360 posts

Posted 04 February 2016 - 07:04 PM

Never felt the need.  Let them grow; even the occasional 'bean stalk' plant will branch out eventually.   Your plants have had millions of years to practice and they DO tend to 'know what they are doing!'  Humans and their control-freak neuroses are neither required nor, I suspect, appreciated.  
 
That said, I could see doing a light 'FIM' as an experiment and to encourage branching.
 
But to whack half the plant off, or (shudder) strip the big, resource intensive, main leaves is just punishing the the plant's efforts.

Does the base of your plants ever look as sturdy as this after one season?

Attached Thumbnails

  • Screenshot_2016-02-04-19-01-34.png

Edited by Thegreenchilemonster, 04 February 2016 - 11:50 PM.


#28 Lovepeppers

Lovepeppers

    Hot

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 917 posts
  • Location:Rialto, Southern California

Posted 04 February 2016 - 11:00 PM

Does the base your plants ever look as sturdy as this after one season?

Nice trunk you have there. I'm sure nutrients will pass quickly through that log.

#29 Swampy_NZ

Swampy_NZ

    Heating Up

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 413 posts
  • Location:Hamilton New Zealand

Posted 05 February 2016 - 01:11 AM

I will always top my plants from now on.The ones which I do not top grow a single tall stem and then split into either 2 or 3 main stems,then split again etc.With topping they grow many strong branches from the base.I think they produce much more although they really do need to be staked properly.I have lost many a branch this year because I was to lazy to stake my hydro plants.Theses were last seasons topped plants.

 

DSCN05331_zpsvmquyrfi.jpg



#30 SvtCobra

SvtCobra

    Heating Up

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 294 posts
  • Location:San Jose

Posted 05 February 2016 - 01:31 AM

Never felt the need.  Let them grow; even the occasional 'bean stalk' plant will branch out eventually.   Your plants have had millions of years to practice and they DO tend to 'know what they are doing!'  Humans and their control-freak neuroses are neither required nor, I suspect, appreciated.  

 

That said, I could see doing a light 'FIM' as an experiment and to encourage branching.

 

But to whack half the plant off, or (shudder) strip the big, resource intensive, main leaves is just punishing the the plant's efforts.

I agree on chopping half the plant off. I only take about an inch or two off the top when it begins to Y.


I will always top my plants from now on.The ones which I do not top grow a single tall stem and then split into either 2 or 3 main stems,then split again etc.With topping they grow many strong branches from the base.I think they produce much more although they really do need to be staked properly.I have lost many a branch this year because I was to lazy to stake my hydro plants.Theses were last seasons topped plants.

 

DSCN05331_zpsvmquyrfi.jpg

This is what I want to avoid. The splitting then splitting again. I want a stocky manageable plant that is bushy.



#31 az1000

az1000

    Hot

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 618 posts
  • Location:Romania

Posted 05 February 2016 - 06:37 AM


Does the base of your plants ever look as sturdy as this after one season?

Nice. What variety is? I think is a Pubescens.

Edited by az1000, 05 February 2016 - 06:38 AM.


#32 Thegreenchilemonster

Thegreenchilemonster

    On Fire!

  • Extreme
  • 7,360 posts

Posted 05 February 2016 - 07:42 AM

Nice. What variety is? I think is a Pubescens.


That one is a Baccatum. Lemon Drop. I have some pubescens with some big trunks as well from topping though.

#33 Yoimthatguy

Yoimthatguy

    Mild

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 30 posts
  • Location:NYC

Posted 05 February 2016 - 10:54 AM

Yeah I always top, I like a short bushy pepper plant. To me a topped pepper plant tends to look healthier and more vigorous. 



#34 az1000

az1000

    Hot

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 618 posts
  • Location:Romania

Posted 05 February 2016 - 01:38 PM

That one is a Baccatum. Lemon Drop. I have some pubescens with some big trunks as well from topping though.

When do you top them? Age? Size?

#35 Thegreenchilemonster

Thegreenchilemonster

    On Fire!

  • Extreme
  • 7,360 posts

Posted 05 February 2016 - 01:58 PM

By size, I usually do the initial topping when it starts to branch into a y. Once that topping recovers, I top/prune the new branches when they begin to form there own y's. After that, the trunk is usually solid enough that the plant can get huge with no issues. If the plant starts getting really huge, like over 4-5 feet, I usually clip the ends of the highest branches to sturdy higher limbs.

Edited by Thegreenchilemonster, 05 February 2016 - 01:58 PM.


#36 mrgrowguy

mrgrowguy

    Hot

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 798 posts
  • aka:mrgg*, aka Brian Dade
  • Location:California - OC

Posted 05 February 2016 - 02:20 PM

Hi, My name is MRGG*, and I am a Topper.

 

I top for fun, I top for production, and I top for space.

 

Put me on the list of "Toppers!"


Edited by mrgrowguy, 05 February 2016 - 02:22 PM.

                      That's right... I grow!    :fireball:  :hot: :fireball:  instagram.com/mrgrowguy/  <--- 18+                                 


#37 Hybrid Mode 01

Hybrid Mode 01

    On Fire!

  • Extreme
  • 5,216 posts
  • aka:Shonas
  • Location:Back up north where I belong.
  • (x1)
  • (x1)

Posted 05 February 2016 - 03:58 PM

Does the base of your plants ever look as sturdy as this after one season?

 

 

     I can't speak for Geonerd, but mine sure do! But topping plants won't have much of an effect on the sturdiness of the plant's stem. It just grows in proportion with the rest of the plant. A big plant will need a wider stem to feed and support the canopy and vice versa. A short, bushy plant will have a stem that is about the same diameter as a tall, bushy plant.

     IMG_0169_zps52077910.jpg



"Nobody wins in a dairy challenge."       -Kenny Rogers


#38 SvtCobra

SvtCobra

    Heating Up

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 294 posts
  • Location:San Jose

Posted 06 February 2016 - 12:58 AM

I should have asked who goes topless..



#39 Geonerd

Geonerd

    Smokin' Hot

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,684 posts
  • Location:Aridzona, Republic of Redneckistan.

Posted 06 February 2016 - 10:46 AM

Does the base of your plants ever look as sturdy as this after one season?

 

I'm not growing Bristlecone Pine trees!  :P


Edited by Geonerd, 10 February 2016 - 05:45 PM.

:fireball:


#40 NTR

NTR

    Mild

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Location:Home

Posted 06 February 2016 - 07:49 PM

Last year I topped one of my plants and it produced so many peppers, but I can't say for sure this was due to the topping of just the plant itself. So as an experiment I am growing 2 plants of 5 selected varieties this year and I will be topping one plant of each variety to see which one will produce more. I wish I could grow more plants of each variety to get a more accurate comparison, but I have limited space.


Edited by NTR, 06 February 2016 - 07:50 PM.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Topping, Pruning, Fiming, Trimming

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests