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Easy Orange Hab Sauce

noob orange habanero

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#1 Malarky

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Posted 27 April 2016 - 10:38 AM

Hi All. It's going to be a long while before my pepper harvest. I'm a complete sauce noob and i'd like to cut my teeth on an easy recipe for the fridge(nonferment).

 

unfortunately all i have access to at the local store is OrangeHab, fresno, green jal, and maybe some serranos. I've done some googling and found some recipes with orange hab, carrots, onions and garlic(sounds good, yum).But I thought I'd ask here to see if anyone with more experience has a standby recipe before i run off and try some foodie blogger's recipe of the day.

 

Thank you!



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#2 juanitos

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Posted 27 April 2016 - 10:55 AM

you can use habs interchangably in recipes, flavor will be a bit different but thats fine for trying out sauces. can always tweak them a bit.

 

there are plenty habanero recipes if you do a search..

i like the mango / pineapple sauce, is fun to have a fruity sauce.

 

http://thehotpepper....range +habanero

 

http://thehotpepper....range habanero

 

http://thehotpepper....ab#entry1212274


Edited by juanitos, 27 April 2016 - 10:56 AM.

juanitospeppers.com

 

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#3 Vicious Vex

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Posted 27 April 2016 - 11:21 AM

Something you can do if you want to have a more complex flavor is experimenting with fermenting the ingredients.   It is not as complex as it sounds when you first dive in.   You just have to pay attention to the weights of your ingredients.  

 

Juanitos is extremely knowledgeable and I would trust his thoughts. Habaneros, like ghost peppers (Bhuts), are extremely versatile. 


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#4 hogleg

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Posted 27 April 2016 - 11:38 AM

click hot sauces on the left. There is a bunch of hab sauces

 

http://www.pepperfoo...ecipe_home.html


Edited by hogleg, 27 April 2016 - 11:40 AM.


#5 KingChile

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Posted 27 April 2016 - 12:31 PM

I'd do green sauce

 

Habaneros

Serranos

Tomatillos

Cilantro

Lime Juice

Salt

Carrots

Onion

I'd also throw in a lil Avocado too!


Edited by KingChile, 27 April 2016 - 12:33 PM.


#6 Malarky

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Posted 28 April 2016 - 09:22 AM

Something you can do if you want to have a more complex flavor is experimenting with fermenting the ingredients.   It is not as complex as it sounds when you first dive in.   You just have to pay attention to the weights of your ingredients.  

 

Juanitos is extremely knowledgeable and I would trust his thoughts. Habaneros, like ghost peppers (Bhuts), are extremely versatile. 

So i read about 7 or 8 of the pages in Fermenting 101 and I'd like to try it...

but i'm hung up on the brine. I chop up all my peppers, carrots, garlic etc., pack the jar, pour yogurt whey over it, but what about the brine. I seem to be getting confused as people talk about %weights? do i need to weigh my ingredients and then use X salt as a percentage of that weight? or is there just a straight up use X salt in Y amount of water to get a Z%brine? is the weight thing related to the weight of ingredients or just a %salt brine?

 

hope that makes sense? thanks

 

edit: Thanks for the links everyone!


Edited by Malarky, 28 April 2016 - 09:23 AM.


#7 salsalady

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Posted 28 April 2016 - 07:36 PM

For a first sauce, using store habs, I'd suggest s a simple cooked sauce, but for fun you could also take the exact same ingredients and do a ferment. 

 

My one comment is that most new sauce makers use waaaaayyyy too much hot peppers for the normal consumer.  If you want the sauce for yourself and you consider yourself a pretty serious chilehead, use up to 50% by volume of habaneros.  For the rest of your friends and family, they will most likely be in the 4-5 habaneros per gallon range (or even less than that).

 

I like to use colored bell peppers (whatever color the chiles are) as a good filler, also apple, pear, any other fruit especially tropical fruits with habs, tomatillo, or other non-spicy peppers that will carry the chile flavor without adding heat.

 

onion, garlic, ginger, other spices and herbs....whatever strikes your fancy. 

 

Good Luck and Have Fun! 

 

Post pics~  we luv pics!  ;)


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#8 Malarky

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Posted 29 April 2016 - 08:56 AM

For a first sauce, using store habs, I'd suggest s a simple cooked sauce, but for fun you could also take the exact same ingredients and do a ferment. 

^exactly what I wanted to do. I'm definitely going to be toning down the hot hot peppers as I have no idea what I can handle.

I'd love to post pics but I don't have a smartphone and my home PC has taken a dump and I've had no time to fix it yet :-(

 

Thanks for the advice SL







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