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Leaf Curling problem, Help with ID!*Hydroponic Peppers*

hydroponic leaf curl leaf curl virus hydroponic peppers

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#1 srgtpepper

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Posted 29 May 2016 - 10:29 AM

Hi everyone,
I have been noticing a lot of leaf curling in my pepper garden and am concerned it might be leaf curling virus. But there is a distinctive pattern on the leaves with the spine of the leaves curling up that I think should be able to help definitively ID the problem.
 
Some quick things to note:
All these are being grown hydroponically, so it COULD be a nutrient issue, such as lack of calcium. However, I've recently noticed this curling issue on one of my tomatoes which is being grown in soil.
 
However, that tomato is the tallest, so I'm also wondering if this could be cause by too much sun or possibly wind?
 
So my suspicions are:
-too much sun
-too much wind
-too much nutrients
-too little nutrients
-or the dreaded leaf curl virus...
 
Any insight would be extremely helpful!
 
Here are a few pictures for reference of the issue:

Edited by srgtpepper, 29 May 2016 - 10:30 AM.


#2 Peter S

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Posted 29 May 2016 - 11:13 AM

Could be mites?



#3 TXCG

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Posted 29 May 2016 - 12:05 PM

That looks like broadmites to me. The downward hooking, squiggly vein & mutated looking foliage is a good sign of mites.

 

Squiggly vein:

 

B9UCntsh.jpg

 

Downward hooking mutated looking new growth:

 

rNa2jK8h.jpg


Sobriety certainly is good, i try to save it for special occasions though.


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#4 srgtpepper

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Posted 29 May 2016 - 01:49 PM

That looks like broadmites to me. The downward hooking, squiggly vein & mutated looking foliage is a good sign of mites.

 

Squiggly vein:

 

B9UCntsh.jpg

 

Downward hooking mutated looking new growth:

 

rNa2jK8h.jpg

 

 

 

Hey!

 

That sounds like better news than what I was thinking...

 

Is there a go-to cure for mites?

 

Are these guys doomed or is it reversible?

 

Thanks again!



#5 TXCG

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Posted 29 May 2016 - 02:03 PM

I almost always fight broad mites on a couple plants every spring & have pretty good luck with spinosad and azamax. I keep spinosad on hand for thrips & azamax for aphids and everything else that chews on plants and one or the other will usually knock mites out after a couple applications. Make sure to coat the bottom of leaves and new growth really well. If a plant is seriously affected like in that pic I posted I'll also trim off some of the worst looking growth since that part won't recover anyway & it helps reduce numbers of mites. 

 

There are also products that are specifically designed as miticides but I'm not familiar with them so wouldn't know what to suggest. I believe some people use sulfur for mites.

 

Basically the leaves that look messed up will never recover but once you get rid of the mites new growth should start looking just fine.


Sobriety certainly is good, i try to save it for special occasions though.


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#6 srgtpepper

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Posted 29 May 2016 - 02:11 PM

okay great. I'm happy to hear it's reversable.

 

For what it's worth, I found a product called safers 3 in 1 that proposes to be an organic wettable sulphur specifically designed to kill broadmites and other insects.

 

I'm going to give it a shot and will report back.

 

Thanks again for all the help.



#7 resili626

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Posted 30 May 2016 - 12:37 AM

Don't go organic, they're just a big marketing scam. Go for imidacloprid if possible. Those things are a systemic insecticide that will grant long lasting protection against any future pests.



#8 TXCG

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Posted 30 May 2016 - 12:56 AM

Don't go organic, they're just a big marketing scam. Go for imidacloprid if possible. Those things are a systemic insecticide that will grant long lasting protection against any future pests.

 

If you do go with imidacloprid be sure to read the label though because it can have a pretty long pre-harvest interval. They Bayer one I was looking at this year had a 21 day PHI. 

 


Sobriety certainly is good, i try to save it for special occasions though.


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#9 resili626

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Posted 30 May 2016 - 04:42 AM

 

If you do go with imidacloprid be sure to read the label though because it can have a pretty long pre-harvest interval. They Bayer one I was looking at this year had a 21 day PHI. 

 

 

That's like the gold standard ain't it? The only imidacloprid that I can find here are termite-grades lol at 18.4. Can you tell me what's the recommended dose of Bayer at what concentration? 



#10 solid7

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Posted 30 May 2016 - 08:15 AM

Don't go organic, they're just a big marketing scam. Go for imidacloprid if possible. Those things are a systemic insecticide that will grant long lasting protection against any future pests.

 

Long-term systemic that works proactively to kill future pests.

Sounds a bit like fallout poisoning, when you say it like that...


Dave2000 - "Problem is, you happened upon the REAL DEAL."

#11 TXCG

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Posted 30 May 2016 - 10:58 AM

 

That's like the gold standard ain't it? The only imidacloprid that I can find here are termite-grades lol at 18.4. Can you tell me what's the recommended dose of Bayer at what concentration? 

 

Here is the label for the one I was looking at, it has dilution ratios for different plants. Concentration is only 0.235% imidacloprid (99.765% other ingredients)

 

Link


Sobriety certainly is good, i try to save it for special occasions though.


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#12 resili626

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Posted 30 May 2016 - 11:32 AM

 

Long-term systemic that works proactively to kill future pests.

Sounds a bit like fallout poisoning, when you say it like that...

 

Drastically different things. One's radioactive, one's a neonicotinoids with very low mammalian toxicity ;) 



#13 solid7

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Posted 30 May 2016 - 11:44 AM

 

Drastically different things. One's radioactive, one's a neonicotinoids with very low mammalian toxicity ;) 

 

Well, thank you, Ted Mosby... ;)


Edited by solid7, 30 May 2016 - 11:45 AM.

Dave2000 - "Problem is, you happened upon the REAL DEAL."

#14 resili626

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Posted 30 May 2016 - 11:53 AM

 

Here is the label for the one I was looking at, it has dilution ratios for different plants. Concentration is only 0.235% imidacloprid (99.765% other ingredients)

 

Link

 

If my math is correct, I would have to dilute a 18.3% imidacloprid 5,111 times in order to get to the dilution rate of Bayer's 0.235% at 0.5 ounce per quart per 10 square meters? 

That means... I would have to extract 1 ml of that shit and make a 5.111 liter solution to use lol. Can you double check if my math is correct? 



#15 Peter S

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 06:27 PM

I have this same problem on mine now. I hope it's not a virus. I'm going to treat for mites, have a spray that's part sulfur and part pyrethrin. The sulfur should kill the mites, and pyrethrin will kill aphids, which are a vector of virus if that's what it is. I've had aphids around recently too, but not seen any on the plants for a while. Either way it should help I hope.

 



#16 twiasp

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 09:03 AM

I'm fairly new, but the tiny white spots also on the leaves that shows where mites have sucked out the cholorphyl.  Looks like what I have researched about Broadmites also.  Good job nailing it, i think, TXCG =)



#17 Peter S

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Posted 11 June 2016 - 01:56 PM

Here's a closeup of some of my affected leaves. It's the day after though, that I sprayed with a mix of sulfur and pyrethrin.

 

 

 



#18 cathee

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Posted 16 June 2016 - 03:27 PM

Did you ever find out what was wrong with your pepper plants? Did the mite spray work? My plants look similar to yours with that squiggly vein so im not sure if its the mites or over fertilization :(



#19 Peter S

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Posted 17 June 2016 - 08:12 AM

Did you ever find out what was wrong with your pepper plants? Did the mite spray work? My plants look similar to yours with that squiggly vein so im not sure if its the mites or over fertilization :(

Not sure if you're asking me or the OP, but I'll share what I've done so far. I first sprayed a bunch of Natria, which has sulfur and pyrethrin. A few days later I trimmed affected leaves and sprayed wettable micronized sulfur, at 2 Tbsp/gal using this sprayer. I like the sprayer because the deflector can be twisted around to make the spray go at an up or down angle, which makes it easier for getting under the leaves. After a week (3 days ago) I was seeing more affected leaves. I trimmed those and sprayed again at 4 Tbsp/gal. I also suspect possible overfertifization (too much N), as the stuff I'm using has urea based nitrogen, which releases faster that what I used before. Plus it was designed for fertiziling turfs, golf course lawns, etc... I was misinformed by the guy at Southern Ag that it was the same as osmocote. After I found out it wasn't I took a gamble and used it anyway. In case it's that, I decided to flush my containers really well and started the drip system to run 30 min every day. After that is all flushed out, I'll go back to using osmocote. I've seen a few bad leaves since, but the new growth is looking good so far. I'll do another round or two of sulfur at 4 Tbsp/gal and flushing, as one of the two or both seem to be helping. Hope this helps.


Edited by Peter S, 17 June 2016 - 08:19 AM.


#20 cathee

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Posted 17 June 2016 - 03:23 PM

Not sure if you're asking me or the OP, but I'll share what I've done so far. I first sprayed a bunch of Natria, which has sulfur and pyrethrin. A few days later I trimmed affected leaves and sprayed wettable micronized sulfur, at 2 Tbsp/gal using this sprayer. I like the sprayer because the deflector can be twisted around to make the spray go at an up or down angle, which makes it easier for getting under the leaves. After a week (3 days ago) I was seeing more affected leaves. I trimmed those and sprayed again at 4 Tbsp/gal. I also suspect possible overfertifization (too much N), as the stuff I'm using has urea based nitrogen, which releases faster that what I used before. Plus it was designed for fertiziling turfs, golf course lawns, etc... I was misinformed by the guy at Southern Ag that it was the same as osmocote. After I found out it wasn't I took a gamble and used it anyway. In case it's that, I decided to flush my containers really well and started the drip system to run 30 min every day. After that is all flushed out, I'll go back to using osmocote. I've seen a few bad leaves since, but the new growth is looking good so far. I'll do another round or two of sulfur at 4 Tbsp/gal and flushing, as one of the two or both seem to be helping. Hope this helps.

 

Hmmmm, im guessing it has to do with fertilization for me then because I have tomato plants growing right next to them and so far they are perfectly healthy. Its only the pepper plants that are affected so I am going to trying flushing it out rather than buying the spray for mites. I should have used osmocote too! I used them last year and my plants grew great. This year I tried tomatotone and MG, which I guess was too much for them. 







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