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Is this BER? Or Sunscald? Or the Birds?


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#1 PepperZ

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Posted 31 August 2016 - 09:25 AM

http://imgur.com/a/dJxe7

 

I have a lot of plants and peppers and it's not super common but I see it more than I'd like.



#2 Mabuse

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Posted 31 August 2016 - 10:12 AM

In my experience birds bitting tends to leave triangular holes in peppers, i don't think this is the work of birds. It looks similar to what i've seen done by pill bugs on a piece of cactus but i'm not sure pill bugs eat peppers (they do eat pepper stems for sure).



#3 spicy nug

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Posted 31 August 2016 - 10:48 AM

It looks like sunscald to me. I had a few pods like that after moving my plants outside without giving them enough cover.



#4 Wicked Mike

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Posted 31 August 2016 - 12:04 PM

http://imgur.com/a/dJxe7

 

I have a lot of plants and peppers and it's not super common but I see it more than I'd like.

 

Heya bud! Definitely not birds. As Mabuse said, mechanical damage looks different. It's not blossom end rot, either. My first instinct would be to say sunscald, but that ring of unripened tissue around the lesions is suspect. I'm no expert, but I'd lean toward a viral or possibly bacterial pathogen. Luckily, although I'm not an expert, I do know one (a plant pathologist, chile enthusiast, and all-around good guy who works for the University of Florida). I just emailed him your picture with a brief explanation, and will let you know what I hear.


"Virtute enim ipsa non tam multi praediti esse quam videri volunt."

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#5 PepperZ

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Posted 31 August 2016 - 03:42 PM

 

Heya bud! Definitely not birds. As Mabuse said, mechanical damage looks different. It's not blossom end rot, either. My first instinct would be to say sunscald, but that ring of unripened tissue around the lesions is suspect. I'm no expert, but I'd lean toward a viral or possibly bacterial pathogen. Luckily, although I'm not an expert, I do know one (a plant pathologist, chile enthusiast, and all-around good guy who works for the University of Florida). I just emailed him your picture with a brief explanation, and will let you know what I hear.

 

That's great. Thanks bro.



#6 smokemaster

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Posted 31 August 2016 - 03:44 PM

Green pod looks like sun,other stuff looks like what I get from Grasshoppers.

When do you water?

Do you see the bark of your plants being chewed off?

I first see the green layer of my plants being eaten,then the pod stems and pods looking like all but the green pod pic.

Here we have Locusts and Camel Crickets.

 

Hope this helps.

Smoke



#7 PepperZ

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Posted 31 August 2016 - 04:34 PM

Green pod looks like sun,other stuff looks like what I get from Grasshoppers.

When do you water?

Do you see the bark of your plants being chewed off?

I first see the green layer of my plants being eaten,then the pod stems and pods looking like all but the green pod pic.

Here we have Locusts and Camel Crickets.

 

Hope this helps.

Smoke

I was just about to post and ask if cricket damage could be the cause. How the hell do you control crickets.

 

I water in early morning/evening. I agree that I think the green chocolate hab is def scald though. 


Edited by PepperZ, 31 August 2016 - 04:36 PM.


#8 Wicked Mike

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Posted 12 September 2016 - 02:11 PM

Well, I heard back from him. He says it looks like a virus, and has offered to test it to confirm if you want to send a sample.

 

My advice would be to (at the least) quarantine any plants that are doing this and check/treat for insects. The problem with viral pathogens is that they can spread like wildfire. Many of them are transmitted by sucking and chewing insects (thrips, whitefly, aphids, etc), so a few bugs can easily spread the virus throughout your grow. Some can even be spread by contact (using the same snips to prune two plants, etc). Most of them are passed along in the seeds themselves, and none of them, unfortunately, are curable.


"Virtute enim ipsa non tam multi praediti esse quam videri volunt."

     - Cicero, De Amicitia


#9 Lovepeppers

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Posted 12 September 2016 - 02:30 PM

Some viruses can stay in the soil for up to a ualf of a century. Like Mike stated, quaritine and pick up every leaf and root, that is if it is a virus.
Evil stuff.




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