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The 11th Annual Hot Pepper Awards ACCEPTING ENTRIES!

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What's hotter...Ripe or unripe

butch t

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#41 SavinaRed

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Posted 16 September 2016 - 12:06 PM

 

 


 

Ok fine, I just happen to have a bunch of jalapeños to test!  Next week I will do Jalapeños to see if we are as smart as we think!  Also, aren't ripe jalapeños RED just like most??  


 

 

Yes indeed they are and I'm really looking forward to those results.



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#42 floricole

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Posted 19 September 2016 - 05:23 AM

I wonder after the test, if the chili is harvested half ripe, and allowed to ripen off the plant. Does his scoville rate will continue to climb or stop it at harvest



#43 ColdSmoke

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Posted 19 September 2016 - 06:26 PM

 

 

Plenty of info that proves that to be correct. Not subjective jargon here,proper studies. There are plenty of stressors,drought is just one of them.

 

here is when you should have posted some of the plentiful evidence that drought makes peppers more hot...I've never seen it. Don't buy it, but also don't care...



#44 Pr0digal_son

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Posted 20 September 2016 - 05:02 AM

Not contributing to your laziness. Your contempt means nothing to me either.

Take care!

#45 The_NorthEast_ChileMan

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Posted 20 September 2016 - 11:59 AM

I usually trust Paul W. Bosland (http://aces.nmsu.edu/academics/pes/paul-w-bosland.html) to give accurate info on pepper growing,  http://aces.nmsu.edu/pubs/_h/H237/

 

The heat level in chile peppers is the result of two factors: the plant's genetics and the interaction of the plant with the environment. The genetic control of heat allows plant breeders to produce a chile pepper plant with a certain relative heat level. For example, the cultivar 'NuMex Joe E. Parker' was genetically selected to produce fruit of "medium" heat. However, environmental factors such as temperature and water influence the heat level. A mild chile pepper cultivar bred for low levels of heat will become hotter when exposed to any type of stress in the field. Conversely, a relatively hot cultivar given optimal environmental conditions will become only moderately hot. A chile pepper plant that genetically produces low-heat fruit will not produce hot chile peppers even when grown in a stressed environment. To produce chile peppers of a predictable heat, both cultivar selection and optimum stress-free growing conditions are important.


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#46 CMJ

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Posted 20 September 2016 - 08:40 PM

Not sure that I buy the "don't water them until they wilt" theory either. At least, not in the extreme heat and humidity of the South. 95-100+ degree temps for days on end is stress enough IMO. I water my plants every day during the dog days and have picked Jalapeños that will burn your face right off! Lol

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#47 wrinklenuts

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Posted 20 September 2016 - 08:48 PM

Not sure that I buy the "don't water them until they wilt" theory either. At least, not in the extreme heat and humidity of the South. 95-100+ degree temps for days on end is stress enough IMO. I water my plants every day during the dog days and have picked Jalapeños that will burn your face right off! Lol
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I totally believe that.

#48 ColdSmoke

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Posted 21 September 2016 - 01:18 PM

Not contributing to your laziness. Your contempt means nothing to me either.

Take care!

 

you too!

 

I usually trust Paul W. Bosland (http://aces.nmsu.edu/academics/pes/paul-w-bosland.html) to give accurate info on pepper growing,  http://aces.nmsu.edu/pubs/_h/H237/

 

The heat level in chile peppers is the result of two factors: the plant's genetics and the interaction of the plant with the environment. The genetic control of heat allows plant breeders to produce a chile pepper plant with a certain relative heat level. For example, the cultivar 'NuMex Joe E. Parker' was genetically selected to produce fruit of "medium" heat. However, environmental factors such as temperature and water influence the heat level. A mild chile pepper cultivar bred for low levels of heat will become hotter when exposed to any type of stress in the field. Conversely, a relatively hot cultivar given optimal environmental conditions will become only moderately hot. A chile pepper plant that genetically produces low-heat fruit will not produce hot chile peppers even when grown in a stressed environment. To produce chile peppers of a predictable heat, both cultivar selection and optimum stress-free growing conditions are important.

 

I guess I'm wrong...I still don't know why someone would intentionally stress their plant for more heat when these chilies are so hot without it.







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