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The BIG MEAT: Giant USDA Prime Ribeye Roast Cooked Like a Steak, Adam Perry Lang Style


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#1 Moose

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 12:51 AM

Yesterday we celebrated the birthday of one of our dearest friends. Earlier in the week, we told her we would prepare whatever she liked, and on Friday, asked for the "Big Meat", the name we gave to a massive bone-in ribeye at a restaurant we all used to frequent years ago.

I decided I wanted to try Adam Perry Lang's prep and cooking technique that the video for this forum won't seem to allow me to post, but if you do a Google search for "Rooftop Grilling with Adam Perry Lang", you'll see the exact video I'm referring to. Watch the video first, before you proceed with the rest of my post, if you would.

 

For convenience, I decided to go with a boneless roast, and happened to find a fine USDA Prime specimen that weighed in at just under 3 lbs:

Big%20Meat%206%2010%202017%207_zps2hfrvm

I then took a heavy wooden rolling pin and proceeded to give it a first class pounding. I was surprised at how quickly it flattened from a nearly four inch thick roast to about 2.5 inches thick. After that, I applied a wet rub of olive oil, lots of fresh garlic, a bit of fresh rosemary, dijon mustard, sea salt, and fresh cracked pepper. Here it is with the wet rub fully applied:

Big%20Meat%206%2010%202017%208_zpsl2o9qn

The meat went into a sealable plastic bag so the wet rub would work its magic.

Later that day, we headed over to our friends place with meat and party favors in hand. The only charcoal grill they have is a Weber OTS, which would be more than adequate for how I planned to cook this beast.

The first thing I did when I got there was to season the meat. I used a compound rub consisting of the following, applied in order:

Lawry's seasoned salt
Oakridge Carne Crosta
Cattleman's Coffee Steak rub

I like the flavor profile of these for large cuts of beef. They also help give the meat a wonderful, savory "crust" at the end when the meat gets seared direct over hot coals. Here it is fully coated and seasoned:

Big%20Meat%206%2010%202017%209_zpsceudyl

I let the meat sit for about an hour so the rub would set, then fired up a large chimney starter full of coals. When the coals were ready, I dumped them over some leftover coals off to one side for an indirect setup:

Big%20Meat%206%2010%202017%2010_zpsgpiga

The only smoking wood they had was hickory, so added a nice piece of the hickory and put the meat on:

Big%20Meat%206%2010%202017%2011_zps6erar

At that point, I put the lid on the kettle and sat back to enjoy a cold one. About 15 minutes later I flipped the meat:

Big%20Meat%206%2010%202017%2012_zps9b9vd

Another 30 or so minutes later, this is how it looked:

Big%20Meat%206%2010%202017%202_zpswro85f

Big%20Meat%206%2010%202017%204_zpsxh0xdl

When the beef was reading about 125 or so, I moved it over to the hot side of the grill so I could put a nice sear on both sides:

Big%20Meat%206%2010%202017%205_zpshmbmqw

Here it is after I pulled it:

Big%20Meat%206%2010%202017%206_zpstt2x0s

I let it rest for about 10 minutes before carving. I didn't take any further pics as there was a lot going on, but given the fact that I was working with a knife that was compromised due to lack of a working edge, and really had to work it with a sharpening steel, the meat cut like warm butter. I cut it into thin slices and dinner was served. It was off the charts, and probably one of the finest beef I've ever consumed - it was almost melt-in-your mouth, it was so tender. Everyone else agreed, so I'm going to do this again soon.

A couple of thoughts:

I obviously deviated from APL with the kind of seasoning I used, as well as the fact that I didn't use an herb brush or serve the beef with a board sauce. I'm not completely sold on the latter two techniques, though at some point, I should probably give them a try just to see what I think. What intrigued me most was his technique of pounding the meat which flattens it out, which increases the surface area of the meat. This clearly helped the fat render much more easily, not to mention the tenderization resulting from the pounding, so I'm a total believer in this now.

I didn't have the time or bandwidth to document this cook with my DSLR, hence the just ok Iphone pictures, but I will definitely do that next time for sure.


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#2 Ashen

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 01:40 AM

 

 

 

 

 

APL  is who took my live fire cooking to the next level years ago.  

Before he even put out his first cookbook , he was a Guest mod on Jamie Oliver's website for a few months . I picked his brain about a lot of things.  That hot multiflip scruffing technique has been my go to for cooking steak  for years.

 

That herb brush thing is money,( I use it most often on leg of lamb)  and board sauce is definitely something I would suggest you try.  I  don't do it often as my wife is not a fan but the Italian in me loves it.  My Zio's favourite steak dish was  thin  steaks cooked  in about a minute  over screaming heat and then dressed with a sauce of   fresh herbs , EVOO ,fresh garlic and a touch red wine vinegar..     Those kinds of  flavours work incredibly well with grilled beef.  I like to believe one of the main drivers behind ChimiChurri in Argentina was all the Italians that emigrated there. 

 

http://www.saveur.co...alsa-delle-Erbe

 

   

 

 


Edited by Ashen, 12 June 2017 - 01:44 AM.

A wise man never  argues with a skunk, a mule, or a cook.

 


#3 t0mato

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 07:55 AM

Very nice! I'd devour that whole thing.
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#4 Moose

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 01:55 PM

 

 

 

 

 

APL  is who took my live fire cooking to the next level years ago.  

Before he even put out his first cookbook , he was a Guest mod on Jamie Oliver's website for a few months . I picked his brain about a lot of things.  That hot multiflip scruffing technique has been my go to for cooking steak  for years.

 

That herb brush thing is money,( I use it most often on leg of lamb)  and board sauce is definitely something I would suggest you try.  I  don't do it often as my wife is not a fan but the Italian in me loves it.  My Zio's favourite steak dish was  thin  steaks cooked  in about a minute  over screaming heat and then dressed with a sauce of   fresh herbs , EVOO ,fresh garlic and a touch red wine vinegar..     Those kinds of  flavours work incredibly well with grilled beef.  I like to believe one of the main drivers behind ChimiChurri in Argentina was all the Italians that emigrated there. 

 

http://www.saveur.co...alsa-delle-Erbe

 

   

Thanks for posting the video - not sure why I wasn't able to do so. I can definitely see the herb brush and board sauce working with lamb, so may give that a try first.

 

 


 


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www.mooseonfire.com


#5 The Hot Pepper

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 01:55 PM

Nice!



#6 Shorerider

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 04:15 AM

Great looking slab-o-meat!!

 

Would've been great to see it plated, oh well, all the more reason to cook another..... :P


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#7 Sinn

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 10:36 PM

Yum that looks amazing!!


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#8 D3monic

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 09:12 AM

Looks great

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#9 Thegreenchilemonster

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 09:28 AM

Yum, that looks delicious!

#10 JayT

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Posted 29 June 2017 - 06:27 AM

So I am going to ask for some convincing on removing the bones.  A bone-in ribeye has been my go to steak for years.  I have always been told that it infuses fat and flavor into the meat.  I get the pro of removing it is easier slicing, but sell me on it.  I also have a bone-in leg of lamb that I plan on cooking soon too.  Should I remove the bone from that and give it a pounding too?  This goes against everything I believe, but I am willing to listen.



#11 t0mato

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Posted 29 June 2017 - 08:06 AM

You gotta go bone-in. Nothing beats a good bone in ribeye. That's one of the juiciest and flavorful cuts of meat out there.

You should cook your leg of lamb on your big green egg. That would be epic.

Edited by t0mato, 29 June 2017 - 08:09 AM.

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#12 JayT

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Posted 29 June 2017 - 09:47 AM

You gotta go bone-in. Nothing beats a good bone in ribeye. That's one of the juiciest and flavorful cuts of meat out there.

You should cook your leg of lamb on your big green egg. That would be epic.

 

That's what I thought. I was ;looking for reasons I am wrong for what I know.



#13 t0mato

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Posted 29 June 2017 - 09:53 AM

None whatsoever. ;)
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#14 Shorerider

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Posted 29 June 2017 - 12:00 PM

Here in Australia roast Lamb is probably more popular than roast beef. Lamb will almost always be fall from the bone tender if cooked long and low enough and never need tenderising. Just like pulled Pork, you should be able to pull it apart straight off the bone.

 

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#15 JayT

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Posted 30 June 2017 - 05:49 AM

The lamb that I have had and loved though, is medium rare, so I don't know about the pulled leg of lamb thing.



#16 oldsalty

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 08:04 AM

The lamb that I have had and loved though, is medium rare, so I don't know about the pulled leg of lamb thing.

Have slow smoked leg of lamb with fantastic results. But my favorite is med rare i still smoke it only much higher heat gets that great crust and juicy wow. Smoke roasting is my favorite method for lamb. And BONE IN ALL THE WAY :)


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#17 oldsalty

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 08:07 AM

Here in Australia roast Lamb is probably more popular than roast beef. Lamb will almost always be fall from the bone tender if cooked long and low enough and never need tenderising. Just like pulled Pork, you should be able to pull it apart straight off the bone.

SR

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