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What kind of tomato blight is this?


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#1 Justosmo

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 07:52 AM

This Roma plant has 0 fruit in it and it's not doing v great. The other seven plants around it have dozens of fruit and none have this bad of an issue with blight.

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#2 Justosmo

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 07:54 AM

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#3 ako1974

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 08:26 AM

I can't open the pics, but I have several tomato plants with early blight - starts in the lower leaves with brown spots, then yellowing, then death.

http://www.missourib...-of-tomato.aspx

It's not bad in my plants; I've been removing the dead branches. I may get worse, though.

 

Most of my plants have tomatoes, including the ones with blight, but I do have a bunch of tomatoes with relatively no blight that have no tomatoes. It's a weird tomato year for me.


Edited by ako1974, 17 July 2017 - 08:27 AM.


#4 Gorizza

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 09:24 AM

Could be early blight (fungus) or septoria leaf spot (bacteria). I can't tell the difference but the prognosis is the same: those plants are going to die.  Odd to see it in pots, but its been a really wet summer.

 

I try to grow tomatoes in Georgia, and here its really important to get resistant varieties, because this disease hits every single year no matter where you plant. The only variety I've ever had survive it is Big Beef Hybrid.



#5 Justosmo

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 10:23 AM

Could be early blight (fungus) or septoria leaf spot (bacteria). I can't tell the difference but the prognosis is the same: those plants are going to die.  Odd to see it in pots, but its been a really wet summer.
 
I try to grow tomatoes in Georgia, and here its really important to get resistant varieties, because this disease hits every single year no matter where you plant. The only variety I've ever had survive it is Big Beef Hybrid.


Should I destroy the plant?

#6 JoynersHotPeppers

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 10:25 AM

The best way to avoid it is to cut all lower branches and do not allow them near the soil. Rain or watering splashback is a great way to have it happen to your plant.

 

Trim all the affected limbs and you may be ok. 


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#7 Justosmo

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 10:28 AM

The best way to avoid it is to cut all lower branches and do not allow them near the soil. Rain or watering splashback is a great way to have it happen to your plant.
 
Trim all the affected limbs and you may be ok. 

that ks I'll do that and do it to the ones not effected yet. I'd hate to destroy it as it is in a set of 8 plants that are all tied together for support.

#8 Gorizza

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 12:24 PM

You'll still get fruit as it slowly spreads up the plant. I've never heard of anyone "saving" plants from these infections. If you keep removing the affected then you might be able to slow the spread enough to still get a lot of fruit.



#9 cone9

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 01:24 PM

This stuff gets me every year too.  Plants are 6-7 feet tall and loaded with fruit - I get a couple ripe tomatoes, then the rest rot when the plants die.

I trim off affected branches but find I can't get ahead of it.

 

Every year I say I'n not going to bother with toms - it's just too frustrating.  But, I love 'em, so I start some plants anyway(my masochistic tendencies hard at work).


Edited by cone9, 17 July 2017 - 01:25 PM.

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#10 catherinew

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 01:36 PM

Early blight  https://www.planetna...e/early-blight/

 

Next year you'll need to give the plants more space/air between them, but that won't necessarily stop the blight. Start a preventative spray when you transplant. It does help, but may only slow the disease.

 

When blight affects my garden, I immediately remove all leaves/branches on the plant. Unfortunately, the plant will probably be removed and put into the garbage, no composting of any tomatoes or peppers in my garden. 


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#11 Gonzo

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 03:06 PM

Always prune your tomato plants,all the branches before the first blossom has to go.

I also grow roma tomatoes and its happened to me before due to a compost i used that i was not familiar with.

You dont have to terminate them,clip off all the affected at the bottom. And clip a few suckers as it will force the plant to fruit faster. The plant might end up dying but you can still get romas out of it. Just do what i mentioned and do it asap.Also never water the plants overhead. Water only at the stem.

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#12 DontPanic

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 03:56 PM

Oh, snap!

I always thought this was just a normal part of the tomato plant life cycle. :)

I've already cut the damaged portions back, and thrown quite a bit of this in my mulch pile. So now my mulch pile will contaminate any tomatoes I grow next year?

Good! This is just the motivation I need to quit tomatoes, and plant more peppers!

#13 stettoman

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Posted 04 August 2017 - 12:55 PM

Septoria will hide in the soil, so if you plant the same plot every year you will suffer a recurrence until it is treated. My Amish Paste plants are suffering the same malady, and did last year as well because I do not rotate.. From what I read, once the plant has it, you may slow it down but the plant will eventually succumb. Good news (well, kinda good)? Septoria does not affect the fruit in any way. a good basic source on septoria:

 

http://msue.anr.msu....pot_of_tomatoes

 

I put in a 20-year old turkey shit compost 3 years ago, and that started the whole mess for me.

 

Probably no consolation, but my tomatoes are a lot further along in their demise, though I have a lot of fruit on them already. At least yours is in a bucket...

 

 


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#14 lek

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Posted 05 August 2017 - 02:40 AM

Should I destroy the plant?

 

Trichoderma to the rescue.






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