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Attempting to root a broken branch aeroponics


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#1 shaggs2riches

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 09:59 PM

Almost two weeks ago I accidentally broke a large branch off a scotch bonnet plant. I was inspired from Peter Stanley's low pressure aeroponics system, so I figured I would give a try at rooting in a similar method. I cut a hole in the center of a 5 gallon pail lid and mounted a small tomato cage to it for support. From Home Depot, I bought a small pond pump and modified the spray attachment to make it quite short. I filled my pail 1/3 full of water and added a liquid root booster fertilizer. The root fertilizer had mention of root hormones and directions for hydroponics. I cut the branch at a 45 degree angle, close to what looked like a node (bump that looked like a branch or leaves could grow from it). The pond pump is sitting in the bottom of the pail and I added an 80 gallon aquarium airstone to it.

 

 Right now the branch is hanging in the pail out of the water being sprayed constantly with the pump. I removed all of the flowers, buds and large leaves, and have the entire setup off to the side of a t-5 light fixture. The lights are on 16-18 hours a day, and are turned off when I go to bed. The remaining leaves look alive and healthy, but I am not sure how often to add nutrients and if and when roots will start to grow. If roots do grow I will plant it in dirt to continue growing over the winter. When I have a chance, I will post a quick video of it. This is a totally new avenue for me. I don't even know if this will work, but I am totally excited to be trying this.



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#2 austin87

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 11:54 PM

Interested to follow. Is the branch woody rather than green? If so, I think the chances it takes are slim. But best of luck either way, and would love to see some pics when you get a chance.

Depending on how long it's been in there I would also recommend a V cut to maximize surface area (think of it like a sharpened pencil). But I wouldn't cut it more if it seems to be doing anything positive or it's been a couple of days.

#3 shaggs2riches

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 12:12 AM

The branch was basically still green on the outside and was thicker than a sharpie marker, maybe a tad bit woody on the inside. It has been 10 days now, so not quite two weeks. Nothing looks to be happening to it inside the pail. I figured maybe it would be a while with a larger branch. I just learned of a hydro shop in town, and was thinking of asking them if they had any hydro nutrients that would work better to help the process. I figure I would give it a good month and if nothing, then it wouldn't do anything.



#4 austin87

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 12:54 AM

Yeah get some pics going. I haven't cloned (essentially what you are doing; taking a cutting and rooting it, it will have identical genetic material to the parent plant) anything larger than a 5" green shoot.

#5 Edmick

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 02:00 AM

Ideally you would see new roots in a week. Maybe as soon as 4 days. I would change the nutrients every 7 days at this stage. Not worried so much about the plant depleting nutrients as i am about breakdown of nutrients. The air stone i think breaks down the mixture quicker (thats just my opinion though)

#6 Hawaiianero

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 03:24 PM

Whatever you do, if the top portion continues to look like it's not dying you should continue the process. I think roots will eventually have to grow as long as the plant stays healthy

 



#7 DWB

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 04:05 PM

Easy deal. I had to make my plants smaller to fit in my winter shelter last year. I trimmed off branches that wouldn't fit. Some had pods in various stages of ripening. I didn't want to waste them or eat them before ripening so I stuck those branches in a plastic pitcher and put it on a south facing windowsill in the kitchen. The pods ripened and I ate them. The branches kept growing leaves and flowering and made more tiny pods. I ate those too. I changed the water once in a while and the sticks eventually grew roots. In the spring, I planted them in pots. Now I have four nice big clones that have been giving me more peppers since July.



#8 DontPanic

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 10:36 PM

Easy deal. I had to make my plants smaller to fit in my winter shelter last year. I trimmed off branches that wouldn't fit. Some had pods in various stages of ripening. I didn't want to waste them or eat them before ripening so I stuck those branches in a plastic pitcher and put it on a south facing windowsill in the kitchen. The pods ripened and I ate them. The branches kept growing leaves and flowering and made more tiny pods. I ate those too. I changed the water once in a while and the sticks eventually grew roots. In the spring, I planted them in pots. Now I have four nice big clones that have been giving me more peppers since July.

 

Do you recall how long it stayed in the pitcher before it started growing roots?



#9 DWB

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 10:14 AM

Late November to early February. By April they had masses of roots.



#10 shaggs2riches

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Posted 29 September 2017 - 06:35 PM

I totally was going to take pictures and post them this weekend. The plant stem was turning black, but up to the top where the branch "wye'd" there were a few stringy pieces that seemed to be roots. I decided to put it in a bucket of soil and see what would happen. To my dismay this morning, when I went to turn on the lights, waiting for me was a plant completely destroyed. Our kittens made their way into my grow stand and had a great time murdering my project. Guess it was a good way to find out that they won't play nice with my plants. I'm going to have to completely close it in before I can start next years seeds. After a bit of cursing and threatening to toss the cats to the curb, I am over it now, but man was that not a good way to wake up for the day.


Edited by shaggs2riches, 29 September 2017 - 06:36 PM.


#11 Peter_L

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Posted 29 September 2017 - 07:54 PM

Ouch, sorry to hear that Shaggs.

 

Like you said, at least now you know your kittens will make short work of pepper plants. I think the heart break from suddenly finding several dozen seedlings ripped up would be a much tougher pill to swallow.






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