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How to preserve peppers in oil?


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#1 Jeffcontonio

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 04:00 PM

When I was younger my Italian grandfather always had a jar of hot peppers in oil. I loved the flavor, but have not found the same stuff he used to buy. It's been maybe 30 years since I've even seen it.

I'd like to try to make my own but everything I read suggests that this is not safe.(botulism) But this was a purchased good so I'm inclined to believe it can be done safely.

What is the trick to preserving peppers in oil? Is it about pickling them first then transferring it to oil?




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#2 madlionsmith

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 04:01 PM

When I was younger my Italian grandfather always had a jar of hot peppers in oil. I loved the flavor, but have not found the same stuff he used to buy. It's been maybe 30 years since I've even seen it.

I'd like to try to make my own but everything I read suggests that this is not safe.(botulism) But this was a purchased good so I'm inclined to believe it can be done safely.

What is the trick to preserving peppers in oil? Is it about pickling them first then transferring it to oil?




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With or without Bochulism.

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#3 Jeffcontonio

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 04:02 PM

Obviously without.


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#4 madlionsmith

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 04:16 PM

Obviously without.


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I was just wondering the same today. I'm going the fermentation route.

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#5 Jeffcontonio

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 04:18 PM

Hmm. That is not a bad idea.

I wish I could remember the flavor, but it's been so long.


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#6 MikeUSMC

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 05:18 PM

Straight from the National Center for Home Food Preservation

http://nchfp.uga.edu...ed_peppers.html

AFAIK, this is one of the ONLY safe recipes for canning peppers in oil, and it has a VERY strict oil:acid (lemon juice) ratio. I highly suggest NOT deviating from this recipe at all!

Hope that helps
:cheers:
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#7 madlionsmith

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 05:23 PM

Straight from the National Center for Home Food Preservation

http://nchfp.uga.edu...ed_peppers.html

AFAIK, this is one of the ONLY safe recipes for canning peppers in oil, and it has a VERY strict oil:acid (lemon juice) ratio. I highly suggest NOT deviating from this recipe at all!

Hope that helps
:cheers:

I knew Mike would come thru.

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#8 madlionsmith

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 05:25 PM

Damn! It always comes back to pH. I still have nO pH meter.. haha. It's almost becoming a necessity I need to buy. Between the preserving, fertilizing and brewing I do.

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#9 MikeUSMC

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 05:25 PM

Haha! Thanks, dude ;)
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#10 Jeffcontonio

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 05:44 PM

Sounds a lot like a salad dressing.


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#11 salsalady

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 06:50 PM

Colorado State has a good page of recipes, for regular pickled peppers/veggies and oil marinated peppers.  

http://extension.col...-at-home-9-314/

 

 

Hot Peppers Marinated in Oil

  • 3 pounds hot peppers (Jalapenos or other varieties)
  • 7 to 14 cloves garlic
  • 7 tablespoons dried oregano
  • 5 cups vinegar
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon pickling salt
  • 3/4 cup vegetable or olive oil

Yield: Makes 7 to 8 pints

Note: Improper procedures when canning vegetables in oil can result in risk of botulism. Read the section on oil and follow exactly the recommended procedures and tested recipe below.

Procedure: Wear rubber gloves when handling hot chilies. Do not touch the eyes or face. Wash peppers. Make two small slits in each whole pepper. Pack one or two garlic cloves and one tablespoon oregano into each clean, hot, sterilized pint jar. Pack peppers tightly into jars, leaving 1-inch headspace.

Combine vinegar, water, salt and oil and bring to a boil. Simmer 5 minutes. Pour hot solution over peppers, leaving 1-inch headspace. Make sure oil is equally distributed across jars. There should be no more than two tablespoons of oil per pint. Carefully wipe the jar lip so it is free of all oil. Add pretreated lids. Process in boiling water bath for the time specified below for your altitude and jar size. For best flavor, store jars five to six weeks before opening.

 

 

 

Not sure if this is what you are looking for, but dried chiles can be put into oil and left to marinate.  It is not suggested to put fresh chiles in oil.  I've also seen recipes with roasted/blackened peppers that are in oil, but those usually say keep refrigerated and use in 5 days.  

 

Edit- as others have said, make SURE to follow the recipe exactly if doing the canned recipe.  You can substitute ingredients as long as the overall weight is the same.  2 pounds of habaneros instead of 2 pounds of jalapenos...that kind of thing.  But to fit all that into the canning jar, the peppers may need to be cut in half.

 

Have Fun!!!

SL

 

 


Edited by salsalady, 04 October 2017 - 06:53 PM.

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#12 Slug

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 11:53 PM

Damn! It always comes back to pH. I still have nO pH meter.. haha. It's almost becoming a necessity I need to buy. Between the preserving, fertilizing and brewing I do.

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Do it!  :D  If you get a PH meter for food prep, please do not pay less than $60-100 US for it.  Anything less and I wouldn't consider it a food safe meter, because the components and quality control is piss poor.  Even if a cheap meter DOES calculate the effects of temperature on PH readings and even if it DOES hold accurate to 0.02, it will not do either thing correctly for very long before it fails...and you will not necessarily know it has failed.  Amazon once had a decent home use probe I'd tested in the past that held reasonable accuracy over time when compared against a $300 bench tester...lemme find it real quick...

 

https://www.amazon.c.../dp/B01ENFOIQE/

 

There's better models, but that one wouldn't set you back too badly for a full starter kit.  You'd still want bigger bottles of calibration and storage fluid if you plan to use it much.  It autocalibrates, adjusts for temperature automatically, has removable probes, and is accurate enough in practice to ensure you hit food safe levels.  Just remember to store the probe wet when you aren't using it.  If you're testing food and soil with it, get a second probe that you only use for soil or fert levels and keep the primary probe strictly for food.  The above model will take sphere, flat, and spear probes.

 

(No way in hell is that thing waterproof, though.  I wouldn't drop it in a pool or some crap.  LOL!)



#13 madlionsmith

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Posted 05 October 2017 - 12:02 AM

 
Do it!  :D  If you get a PH meter for food prep, please do not pay less than $60-100 US for it.  Anything less and I wouldn't consider it a food safe meter, because the components and quality control is piss poor.  Even if a cheap meter DOES calculate the effects of temperature on PH readings and even if it DOES hold accurate to 0.02, it will not do either thing correctly for very long before it fails...and you will not necessarily know it has failed.  Amazon once had a decent home use probe I'd tested in the past that held reasonable accuracy over time when compared against a $300 bench tester...lemme find it real quick...
 
https://www.amazon.c.../dp/B01ENFOIQE/
 
There's better models, but that one wouldn't set you back too badly for a full starter kit.  You'd still want bigger bottles of calibration and storage fluid if you plan to use it much.  It autocalibrates, adjusts for temperature automatically, has removable probes, and is accurate enough in practice to ensure you hit food safe levels.  Just remember to store the probe wet when you aren't using it.  If you're testing food and soil with it, get a second probe that you only use for soil or fert levels and keep the primary probe strictly for food.  The above model will take sphere, flat, and spear probes.
 
(No way in hell is that thing waterproof, though.  I wouldn't drop it in a pool or some crap.  LOL!)

Wow, great info thanks man. I actually had my eye on that model for a while. It seems like a great deal. I have it marked on my X-Mas list now.

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#14 Voodoo 6

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Posted 05 October 2017 - 12:49 AM

I don't know about the whole soaking peppers in oil. Would probably just blend a pepper in oil and use fresh. The whole infusion thing is not worth a trip to the ER.



#15 MikeUSMC

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Posted 05 October 2017 - 07:27 AM

I highly suggest NOT deviating from this recipe at all!

Edit- as others have said, make SURE to follow the recipe exactly if doing the canned recipe.  You can substitute ingredients as long as the overall weight is the same.  2 pounds of habaneros instead of 2 pounds of jalapenos...that kind of thing.  But to fit all that into the canning jar, the peppers may need to be cut in half.

If I could just add onto this a little bit.....

You can't just swap out one vegetable for another by weight either, since all veggies have different pH levels. For example, the recipe calls for 3lbs of peppers. That DOESN'T mean you could use 2 1/2lbs of peppers and 1/2lb of onion because you'd like onion in the recipe too. The INDIVIDUAL weights for the INDIVIDUAL ingredients cannot be altered, because any deviation has not been tested. Doing so would be at your own risk. You can't just "up the garlic a little" and cut back a little on the peppers. I hope that makes sense.

That also goes for the jar sizes. This recipe was safely tested for pint and half pint jars ONLY. Anything bigger (quarts, half gallons, gallons, etc.) are not safe to BWB can. You can always safely go down in jar size for canning, but never up, due to heat penetration issues during the BWB process.

Sorry to throw a bunch of grumpy "rules" at you guys/gals. I'd just hate for anyone to "wing it" with this recipe and get sick, that's all. Botulism is no joke
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