Jump to content

  •  


The 11th Annual Hot Pepper Awards ACCEPTING ENTRIES!

Photo

Is it always necessary to Boil the Sauce?

Hot Sauce Boil Oven Sterilize Cooking Time Shelf Life Bottling 190 F Packaging Legal

  • Please log in to reply
16 replies to this topic

#1 Lord_Heken

Lord_Heken

    Mild

  • New Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Location:Costa Rica

Posted 20 October 2017 - 01:05 PM

Hello friends!!..

 

This is my first post, and to be honest, I learned a lot here, so many tips, so many info, so many things to get things going!!!.. this is a great community!!..  :party:

 

 

Now, to the topic!!..

 

In several posts, people talk about "boiling the sauce" or in other words, reaching at least 190F/90C in order to do a safely bottling.

 

My actual recipe (that I'm trying to commercialize) does not include this part, instead I cook everything for 45 minutes at 385 F/ 196 C and then comes the blending and mixing process.

 

Once I'm done and the consistency of the sauce it's correct, I get the sauce into the sterilized glass bottles (Boiled in Water) and close them (caps are sterilized too). The sauce could be at temperature of 100 F/ 37 C to 122 F / 50 C approx.

 

I know that the sauce boiling is for safety precautions when bottling, but, is it necessary after the long cooking time of the natural ingredients?

 

**I'm saying boiling to called as the process, not as the actual boiling boiling..  ;) 

 

Thanks in advanced!!..



#1A Guest

Guest

  • Guest
  • Pip
  • 1 post

#2 SmokenFire

SmokenFire

    Smokin' Hot

  • Moderators
  • 3,720 posts
  • aka:the ralphster
  • Location:chicago
  • (x9)

Posted 20 October 2017 - 01:19 PM

Hello friends!!..

 

This is my first post, and to be honest, I learned a lot here, so many tips, so many info, so many things to get things going!!!.. this is a great community!!..  :party:

 

 

Now, to the topic!!..

 

In several posts, people talk about "boiling the sauce" or in other words, reaching at least 190F/90C in order to do a safely bottling.

 

My actual recipe (that I'm trying to commercialize) does not include this part, instead I cook everything for 45 minutes at 385 F/ 196 C and then comes the blending and mixing process.

 

Once I'm done and the consistency of the sauce it's correct, I get the sauce into the sterilized glass bottles (Boiled in Water) and close them (caps are sterilized too). The sauce could be at temperature of 100 F/ 37 C to 122 F / 50 C approx.

 

I know that the sauce boiling is for safety precautions when bottling, but, is it necessary after the long cooking time of the natural ingredients?

 

**I'm saying boiling to called as the process, not as the actual boiling boiling..  ;) 

 

Thanks in advanced!!..

 

Hello and welcome to our forum Lord_Heken.  :)

 

Boiling = 212F so you are certainly boiling your sauce during your cooking procedure at 385F prior to mixing and blending.  So long as that sauce stays hot (140F is the minimum) while you are pouring it into sterilized glass bottles you should be fine.

 

Here is a link to pdf on the hot fill/hold method you are using, I hope that helps.  

 

 


It felt like satan pissed in my mouth it was so hot and lasted a long time. It was a horrible experience eating one of them. - SavinaRed
I would love to travel to your castle to roam the land,eat pie and hunt woman. - sicman
 
 

#3 dragonsfire

dragonsfire

    On Fire!

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,164 posts
  • Location:Medicine Hat

Posted 20 October 2017 - 01:23 PM

:welcome:



#4 Chewi

Chewi

    Smokin' Hot

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,778 posts
  • aka:Ilikebeer, grillmaster
  • Location:Weatherford, TX

Posted 20 October 2017 - 01:51 PM

Cool, whereabouts in Costa Rica are you? Dig that place!!



#5 Lord_Heken

Lord_Heken

    Mild

  • New Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Location:Costa Rica

Posted 20 October 2017 - 03:02 PM

 

Hello and welcome to our forum Lord_Heken.  :)

 

Boiling = 212F so you are certainly boiling your sauce during your cooking procedure at 385F prior to mixing and blending.  So long as that sauce stays hot (140F is the minimum) while you are pouring it into sterilized glass bottles you should be fine.

 

Here is a link to pdf on the hot fill/hold method you are using, I hope that helps.  

 

 

 

Thanks SmokenFire , I'm checking the file now!!..

 

Other detail is that, the ingredients are cooked in a oven, you may call it grilled.. could this make a difference?

 

Regards...



#6 The Hot Pepper

The Hot Pepper

    On Fire!

  • Administrators
  • 41,521 posts
  • aka:Pookie
  • Location:NYC
  • (x3)

Posted 20 October 2017 - 03:02 PM

:welcome:



#7 Lord_Heken

Lord_Heken

    Mild

  • New Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Location:Costa Rica

Posted 20 October 2017 - 03:04 PM

Cool, whereabouts in Costa Rica are you? Dig that place!!

 

 

Hello Chewi... Pura vida!!!  :cheers:  . . . I'm from Heredia!!...



#8 austin87

austin87

    Hot

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 692 posts
  • Location:Oakland, CA

Posted 20 October 2017 - 03:05 PM

 

Thanks SmokenFire , I'm checking the file now!!..

 

Other detail is that, the ingredients are cooked in a oven, you may call it grilled.. could this make a difference?

 

Regards...

 

Can you elaborate on your process a bit more? Are you saying that you grill your ingredients, then mash them into sauce? Is there a stage where there is fermentation going on? This would be helpful information.

 

and Welcome!



#9 Lord_Heken

Lord_Heken

    Mild

  • New Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Location:Costa Rica

Posted 20 October 2017 - 03:10 PM

 

Can you elaborate on your process a bit more? Are you saying that you grill your ingredients, then mash them into sauce? Is there a stage where there is fermentation going on? This would be helpful information.

 

and Welcome!

 

Sure,

 

No fermentation process at all. All the ingredients are cooked in a regular kitchen oven at 385F for 45 minutes, then blended and mixed with the rest of spices, water , vinegar, etc... 



#10 austin87

austin87

    Hot

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 692 posts
  • Location:Oakland, CA

Posted 20 October 2017 - 04:07 PM

 

Sure,

 

No fermentation process at all. All the ingredients are cooked in a regular kitchen oven at 385F for 45 minutes, then blended and mixed with the rest of spices, water , vinegar, etc... 

 

I would think you are fine, especially since you are adding vinegar. As SmokenFire said, would be safest if bottled while the sauce is at least 140 degrees. May also want to check your pH levels of the finished sauce before bottling, but it sounds very tasty (I'm thinking roasted garlic and chiles.... mmmmm!).



#11 MikeUSMC

MikeUSMC

    Smokin' Hot

  • Extreme
  • 1,968 posts
  • aka:Iron Mike
  • Location:Central Connecticut (Zone 6A)

Posted 20 October 2017 - 04:17 PM

Hmmmmm....... "baked" sauce, eh? Veeeeeewwwwwy intewwwwesting.....
GIVE WAR A CHANCE

#12 Lord_Heken

Lord_Heken

    Mild

  • New Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Location:Costa Rica

Posted 20 October 2017 - 04:41 PM

Thanks for the info!!!..  :dance:

 

 

Feel free to try the cooking process.. it's totally different and flavorish!!  :party:

 

 

 

 

 

 



#13 salsalady

salsalady

    On Fire!

  • Extreme Biz
  • 13,136 posts
  • aka:SL, HSL
  • Location:eastern WA, USA... the dry side of the state
  • (x8)

Posted 20 October 2017 - 06:14 PM

If I understand correctly....the ingredients are roasted in an oven at 385F for 45 minutes, blended while hot with other ingredients....then straight into the bottles?

 

 

After the roasted ingredients are blended with the liquids and spices and it's actually a sauce, it doesn't have to boiled/simmered for an extended period of time.  The sauce should be brought back up to about 200F for 10 minutes or so.  Doesn't need to be a full rolling boil, just back up to simmer.  This will kill any nasties that might be in any of the other ingredients being used, including dry spices.  

 

This is assuming there is enough acid/vinegar in the sauce to make it below 4.0pH-ish.  

 

After the short simmer, bottle away!

 

The Hot Fill/Hold that SmokenFire linked is an excellent reference.  Usually we suggest to have the sauce at 180F minimum when bottling, that's what most processes require with a pH of 4.1 or below.  Just kind of a good standard to follow.  

 

Have Fun and good luck with your commercial sauce venture!

 

salsalady

 

 


PureEvilProducts

The Chile Addict's prayer-"Lord, grant me the wisdom to know it will be too hot, the courage to eat it anyway, and the serenity to accept the pain that follows. Amen"

PepperPeopleRock! 


#14 Lord_Heken

Lord_Heken

    Mild

  • New Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Location:Costa Rica

Posted 20 October 2017 - 06:36 PM

If I understand correctly....the ingredients are roasted in an oven at 385F for 45 minutes, blended while hot with other ingredients....then straight into the bottles?

 

 

After the roasted ingredients are blended with the liquids and spices and it's actually a sauce, it doesn't have to boiled/simmered for an extended period of time.  The sauce should be brought back up to about 200F for 10 minutes or so.  Doesn't need to be a full rolling boil, just back up to simmer.  This will kill any nasties that might be in any of the other ingredients being used, including dry spices.  

 

This is assuming there is enough acid/vinegar in the sauce to make it below 4.0pH-ish.  

 

After the short simmer, bottle away!

 

The Hot Fill/Hold that SmokenFire linked is an excellent reference.  Usually we suggest to have the sauce at 180F minimum when bottling, that's what most processes require with a pH of 4.1 or below.  Just kind of a good standard to follow.  

 

Have Fun and good luck with your commercial sauce venture!

 

salsalady

 

 

 

 

 

Hello SalsaLady, correct, it is as you describe it. 

 

 

Thanks for the tips... 

 

Quick question... 

 

 

How is a good way to contrarest evaporation?  Because 10.min at 200F will definitely chance the consistency... 

 

Regards.... 



#15 SmokenFire

SmokenFire

    Smokin' Hot

  • Moderators
  • 3,720 posts
  • aka:the ralphster
  • Location:chicago
  • (x9)

Posted 20 October 2017 - 06:43 PM

Not if you put a lid on it.


Edited by SmokenFire, 20 October 2017 - 06:44 PM.

It felt like satan pissed in my mouth it was so hot and lasted a long time. It was a horrible experience eating one of them. - SavinaRed
I would love to travel to your castle to roam the land,eat pie and hunt woman. - sicman
 
 

#16 salsalady

salsalady

    On Fire!

  • Extreme Biz
  • 13,136 posts
  • aka:SL, HSL
  • Location:eastern WA, USA... the dry side of the state
  • (x8)

Posted 20 October 2017 - 06:51 PM

When bringing to temp, use a lid ^^^.

 

 

When working with batches, even 8L/2gal batches and bottling by hand, there will likely be some evaporation and consistency changes during the time it takes to bottle it all up by hand.  When you notice the sauce getting thicker, add a bit of hot/boiling water.  You aren't watering the sauce down, merely replacing water that has evaporated due to the process.  

 

When using smaller pots making smaller batches (4-12L/1-3gal), after the sauce has been brought up to temp or cooked and it is ready to bottle by hand, I like to put the sauce pot in a double boiler set up.  It keeps the sauce hot and eliminates the risk of scorching.  

 

 


PureEvilProducts

The Chile Addict's prayer-"Lord, grant me the wisdom to know it will be too hot, the courage to eat it anyway, and the serenity to accept the pain that follows. Amen"

PepperPeopleRock! 


#17 Lord_Heken

Lord_Heken

    Mild

  • New Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Location:Costa Rica

Posted 22 October 2017 - 03:44 PM

Great!! thanks for all the info!!.. Friday's batch went very good!! 
 
I added water to the final stage and the consistency was ok and flavor didn't change!!..
 
Thanks again for all the tips..






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Hot Sauce, Boil, Oven, Sterilize, Cooking Time, Shelf Life, Bottling, 190 F, Packaging, Legal

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests