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First hot sauce attempt


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#1 b3rnd

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 11:23 AM

Hey there people! I just tried to make my hot sauce according to the following recipe:

 

  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 cup carrot, chopped
  • 2 cups water
  • 10 habanero peppers, seeded and fine chopped (more or less based on the heat level you desire.)
  • 3 tablespoons lime juice, can also use orange juice
  • 3 tablespoons white vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • optional papayas, prickly pear fruit or mango

Sauté garlic in coated sauce pan. Once the garlic starts to give off it's aroma, add the onion, carrots, and water.

 

Bring to boil, reduce heat and simmer until the carrots are soft.

 

Remove from heat .

 

Add habaneros, optional fruits, lime juice and salt to the carrot mixture.

 

Place in a blender and puree until it reaches a smooth consistency.

 

Pour into sterilized bottles or jars and seal. Keep refrigerated.

 

 

 

I followed the recipe exactly, although I had to change the measurements from US to metric so it could be a little bit off. I used a mango as the optional fruit. The sauce turned out spicy as hell so I succeeded on the hot part. But it had a very strong Chinense aroma, which I hoped to mask with the mango. I tried to add some honey to balance the heat a bit but it didn't help with the Chinense aroma and in the end I might have added too much honey.. Whoops.

 

Any tips here? I'd love to get good at making hot sauces. I have one planned with passion fruit and peaches, but I really need to find a way to mask the Chinense aroma...


It's a little chilly.


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#2 Jubnat

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 11:34 AM

I don't know, maybe you could cook it longer to mellow the flavor.

 

But, every time I make hot sauce, I'm trying to figure out how to preserve or amplify that chinense aroma and flavor.



#3 b3rnd

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 11:45 AM

I don't know, maybe you could cook it longer to mellow the flavor.

 

But, every time I make hot sauce, I'm trying to figure out how to preserve or amplify that chinense aroma and flavor.

 

Yeah opinions seem to be all over the place regarding liking the flavor or not. I'm not a big fan, although I like it if it's in the background. I have a store-bought mango-habanero hot sauce that I gobble up. But it doesn't have a noticeable Chinense flavor at all. I'm gonna let it cool down now to see if that changes anything. If it doesn't I'll cook it longer.


It's a little chilly.


#4 sirex

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 01:35 PM

User less Habs. Perhaps a super or two instead. You aren't making a lot of sauce there so the heat from a couple supers instead will keep the heat level but diminish the overall chinense flavor.

Use some other peppers for volume. Maybe some bells or some type of sweet peppers.

Never sacrifice flavor for heat.


#5 The Hot Pepper

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 04:33 PM

Cook longer. Similar to garlic, the fresher, the harsher. You can add water as you lose water to get to the consistency you need.



#6 The Hot Pepper

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 04:33 PM

Can also roast the peppers first which cooks but also adds a nice roasted flavor.



#7 Mr.CtChilihead

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 05:12 PM

User less Habs. Perhaps a super or two instead. You aren't making a lot of sauce there so the heat from a couple supers instead will keep the heat level but diminish the overall chinense flavor.

Use some other peppers for volume. Maybe some bells or some type of sweet peppers.

 

 

This..^^^



#8 sirex

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 05:24 PM

In the same vein as THP the longer you let it sit, the more the flavor will meld. There is a definite difference in fresh sauce and sauce that has been processed and melded for 2 weeks, 4 weeks etc.

Never sacrifice flavor for heat.


#9 The Hot Pepper

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 05:25 PM

Indeed, it basically marinates in its own juices, so to speak, so everything starts to meld as it lends flavors to surrounding flavors... and becomes much more incorporated.



#10 The Hot Pepper

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 05:26 PM

3 weeks is sort of the sweet spot so we are on the same page... ;)



#11 Mr.CtChilihead

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 05:36 PM

Always better after a month..



#12 Buzzman19

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 08:06 PM

I have been making my own Hot Sauces for 6-8 yrs now. the one thing I stress is you cant taste the sauce right away.  If you let the sauce sit a few days after bottled it will taste completely different.  This heavy Chinense taste you keep commenting about is common after just cooking.  It will or should die down after a few days and then you should have a nice smooth and mellow tasting sauce. 

 

 

I am no expert but this is just what I have found over the years. 

 

 

cheers and good luck! 



#13 b3rnd

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 05:50 AM

User less Habs. Perhaps a super or two instead. You aren't making a lot of sauce there so the heat from a couple supers instead will keep the heat level but diminish the overall chinense flavor.

Use some other peppers for volume. Maybe some bells or some type of sweet peppers.

 

Thanks! I don't have superhots available right now unfortunately. Will try to use other peppers for volume though! 

 

Cook longer. Similar to garlic, the fresher, the harsher. You can add water as you lose water to get to the consistency you need.

 

Cool, thank you for the tip! Will try to cook longer. Hope to find the sweet spot because I do like the flavor, just nog when it's so prominent.

 

Can also roast the peppers first which cooks but also adds a nice roasted flavor.

 

That sounds good too! Any tips on roasting? I've tried it in a pan but it gave more of a burned flavor.

 

In the same vein as THP the longer you let it sit, the more the flavor will meld. There is a definite difference in fresh sauce and sauce that has been processed and melded for 2 weeks, 4 weeks etc.

 

Well I hope to find out soon enough then! Gonna try to make some more sauce with different peppers and fruits to try some combinations.

 

Indeed, it basically marinates in its own juices, so to speak, so everything starts to meld as it lends flavors to surrounding flavors... and becomes much more incorporated.

 

That sentence just made my mouth water, lol!

 

I have been making my own Hot Sauces for 6-8 yrs now. the one thing I stress is you cant taste the sauce right away.  If you let the sauce sit a few days after bottled it will taste completely different.  This heavy Chinense taste you keep commenting about is common after just cooking.  It will or should die down after a few days and then you should have a nice smooth and mellow tasting sauce. 

 

 

I am no expert but this is just what I have found over the years. 

 

 

cheers and good luck! 

 

Good tip, thank you! Hope to gain the same experience as you guys on here one day.

 

 

 

I have another question: how do I get a smoother texture? I've been blending my sauce for a long time but it still has that 'mashy' texture. 


Edited by b3rnd, 14 November 2017 - 05:51 AM.

It's a little chilly.


#14 sirex

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 06:44 AM

Most people skin the veggies after they roast them ( I don't though ). Put the peppers into a paper bag for about 10 minutes and then slide the skin right off.

Smoother texture. After you cook do you blend again? If not do that and then run it through a food mill. That'll smooth it right out.

Never sacrifice flavor for heat.


#15 The Hot Pepper

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 10:50 AM

I have another question: how do I get a smoother texture? I've been blending my sauce for a long time but it still has that 'mashy' texture. 

 

This goes back to cook time. Tomatoes eventually becomes tomato paste. ;)



#16 b3rnd

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 02:23 PM

Most people skin the veggies after they roast them ( I don't though ). Put the peppers into a paper bag for about 10 minutes and then slide the skin right off.

Smoother texture. After you cook do you blend again? If not do that and then run it through a food mill. That'll smooth it right out.

 

 

 

This goes back to cook time. Tomatoes eventually becomes tomato paste. ;)

 

Cooked it for a while more and it still doesn't quite have the texture I want. It helped a bit though! I guess I'll be buying a food mill tomorrow. Does it make any difference if I'm using a hand blender or a 'normal' blender?

 

Edit: Oh and cooking it more definitely helped with the Chinense flavor! Thanks for all the tips people. 

 

One more thing. I ordered some litmus strips to check my Ph, but the color of the sauce is the same as the color of a Ph of 4 on the strip. No money for an expensive Ph-meter right now. I added about triple the amount of acids it said in the recipe to be sure. Any tips on this?


Edited by b3rnd, 14 November 2017 - 02:26 PM.

It's a little chilly.


#17 The Hot Pepper

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 02:29 PM

Put a lid on it for awhile on low so it cooks but does not lose moisture, this will also let you cook it until everything breaks down. You can add water if it loses too much, and manage the consistency this way, but if the texture is not there yet, cooking will do it. Apples make apple sauce, chunky or smooth, and eventually apple butter, it's all about cooking. I don't even use a food mill but others do.



#18 b3rnd

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 02:39 PM

Put a lid on it for awhile on low so it cooks but does not lose moisture, this will also let you cook it until everything breaks down. You can add water if it loses too much, and manage the consistency this way, but if the texture is not there yet, cooking will do it. Apples make apple sauce, chunky or smooth, and eventually apple butter, it's all about cooking. I don't even use a food mill but others do.

 

So cooking it longer doesn't matter that much? I was really afraid to overcook it. How long do you think I should cook it for?


It's a little chilly.


#19 sirex

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 06:42 PM

Don't be afraid to overcook it. But pay attention so it doesn't cook to the bottom of the pot or burn to the bottom.

How long did you cook it?

Never sacrifice flavor for heat.


#20 The Hot Pepper

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 06:44 PM

So cooking it longer doesn't matter that much? I was really afraid to overcook it. How long do you think I should cook it for?

 

Until you get the consistency/texture you desire.






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