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How’s your compost tea performing on your peppers?

Compost tea peppers

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#21 solid7

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Posted 18 May 2018 - 10:46 PM

That makes sense and would be the reason how plants could continue to grow without us. Perfecting it would make growing peppers much better and stronger

 

If you want to see amazing, start piling organic matter near where you garden, and inoculate it with teas.  Then, start using no-till methods in the area where you've done this.  Every year, continue piling organic matter, and using teas.  It's possible that you may never fertilize again. (especially if you utilize nitrogen fixing cover crops)


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#22 Ghostpepperevolution

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Posted 18 May 2018 - 11:06 PM

Nice, that is the plan actually. Been piling up compost and manure collection to add nutes back into soil. Also have a plethora of earth worms that Ive started finding that have been breeding and adding them to every pot to build back into the soil. I live in old swampland so its a fertile place even though I use an acidic pine bark based soil
Put down the pot and pick up the pod

#23 solid7

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Posted 19 May 2018 - 08:10 AM

 I live in old swampland so its a fertile place even though I use an acidic pine bark based soil

 

I live about 100 miles north of you.

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There is no "even though" about it.  Pine bark is great stuff.  Acidic doesn't equal bad.  Also, we live on a giant sand dune, filled with ancient shell matter.  The Ph of our "soil" tends to run about 8-8.5.  So there is no problem with pine bark. (it's actually a soil conditioner here)  Even in containers, if you get your microbes going, the Ph will be less of a problem.  It's a huge concern if you're working with a sterile media - as in hydroponics - where there's nothing but the chemicals that you add, to set and buffer the Ph.


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#24 ShowMeDaSauce

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Posted 19 May 2018 - 08:47 AM

My containers that have a mix from last year have a pretty good amount pine bark and compost. Its been great in the containers. They hold a very reasonable amount of water but not so much its muddy. I have a couple left to fill. When i checked them the other day with a trowel i was amazed how nice they felt. Almost fluffy but not dried out.

 

I got a couple more this year in a test mix with even more aged pine bark fines. Drainage is stellar but it doesn't look "alive" like my old mix. So its time for some tea probably. I added worm castings to it already. I think it just needs a little bump in the right direction.

 

I keep a small compost pile in my little ground plot. The different in how the soil feels is dramatic. No tilling is needed. I just rake it out onto the surface of the plot weeks before planting. You can easily dig a hole with a hand trowel and its full of worms. Teas are just another way to achieve a similar effect.....Encourage a living soil.


Edited by ShowMeDaSauce, 19 May 2018 - 09:01 AM.


#25 thefish

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Posted 19 May 2018 - 01:52 PM

 

cant deny the effects of microbials- they really do help you get more from your plants 







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