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Is This Enough Space?

Hit pepper Carolina reaper Space Garden Outdoors

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#1 Palmetto

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Posted 10 July 2018 - 06:10 PM

So my three Carlina Reaper plants are getting bigger now and I wanting to plant them in one of my raised garden beds now. I am wanting to plant them in between some corn and tomatoes. Here are some pictures. Does it seem like enough space? I would cut back some of the lower leaves on the corn and the tomatoes to allow more light in.

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#2 SmokenFire

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Posted 10 July 2018 - 06:53 PM

I try to give my pepper plants at least 10-12 inches of space between plants Palmeto.  The corn and maters are already pretty big, so your reapers would do better with a bit more room to stretch their legs imo.  They do well enough in pots given good soil.


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#3 Edmick

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Posted 10 July 2018 - 07:03 PM

Not a good idea. Your corn and tomatoes are going to grow much quicker than your peppers and overtake it. I wouldn't have even planted the corn and tomatoes that close, much less put something between them. My corn grew so quick that the weeds didn't even survive.



#4 Ghaleon

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Posted 10 July 2018 - 07:21 PM

I know corn uses a lot of water but God damn...

#5 Edmick

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Posted 10 July 2018 - 09:24 PM

I know corn uses a lot of water but God damn...

Not so much water usage as it is that they overshadow everything leaving very little sunlight for anything else. Especially since they need to be somewhat close together and there needs to be multiple corn plants for good pollination. I would personally leave at least 3 feet between corn and any other plant. That's just from personal experience though. Maybe other people have better luck doing it but it didn't work out well for me.  



#6 Grass Snake

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Posted 10 July 2018 - 10:09 PM

It's not ideal but you may be able to squeeze in one plant at the edge of the box. Hopefully the sun comes up on that side. Half of gardening is about experimenting,  so go for it! You will get a much better idea of how much space you will need for next year. Can't do much about the corn but you can keep the tomato plant under control. 


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#7 solid7

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Posted 11 July 2018 - 12:07 PM

I'll be the contrarian, here.
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This year, I pretty much planted with a shoehorn into my raised beds.  Stuff isn't big enough yet to tell how it's going to work, but all indications are good. Keep nutrients in your beds, and the added shade will be good for keeping the roots cool.

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I think the bigger problem is that you don't really have alot of season left to grow superhots where you're at.  Should have started this early...  But might be a good experiment to show you what you can get away with next season, and you can always overwinter the Reaper.


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#8 Palmetto

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 10:58 AM

Alright, so I decided not to plant them there. I have other peppers growing, but I started the Reapers way to late. But, where I am we don't get our first frost until very late November or early December. I am in Southeastern VA and live on the Southern side of a large lake.

Edited by Palmetto, 12 July 2018 - 10:58 AM.


#9 Doelman

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 11:07 AM

I would plant your reapers in a pot, that spot is way too crowded and even with a November first frost you may not get any fruit.  If they're in pots you could extend their season and make sure you get some peppers.  I would also limb up your tomatoes there, you don't want leaves so close to the soil.



#10 solid7

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 11:15 AM

Alright, so I decided not to plant them there. I have other peppers growing, but I started the Reapers way to late. But, where I am we don't get our first frost until very late November or early December. I am in Southeastern VA and live on the Southern side of a large lake.

 

Frost is one thing... when do you get your first daytime dip into the 50's?  That's usually the end of pepper progress for a season.


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#11 Palmetto

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 06:03 PM

 

Frost is one thing... when do you get your first daytime dip into the 50's?  That's usually the end of pepper progress for a season.

Our first days to dip into the 50s according to our local weather station records are in mid November. 







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