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#41 Deano5x

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Posted 22 April 2019 - 03:27 PM

There getting taller !


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#42 Sawyer

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Posted 02 May 2019 - 12:24 PM

Forests of seedlings!

Awesome getting this season underway in
a big way, John! The flats look great, dense
with starts and nice and green.

Thanks, Paul.  No saw logs yet, but maybe some day.

 

There getting taller !


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Yes, indeed.

 

There may be some overlap and/or gaps with respect to my last numbers post, but here are some germination numbers from yesterday.  If there's only one number, that's the number germinated; for the last planting, I didn't record how many seeds were sown.

 

Planted 4/12 (these are all purchased from vendors or sent from other THPers):

 

Poblano - 23/25

Habanada - 15/25

Sugar Rush Peach - 24/25

Purple BJ - 5/8

White Habanero - 16/19

Madame Jeannette - 22/26

Tekne Dolmasi - 17/25

Aleppo - 21/25

Santa Fe Grande - 33/60

Hot Tomatoes - 9/28

Bull's Heart - 26/40

Palmyra - 17/30

Sweet Charleston - 22/25

 

Planted 4/12 (These are all my own seeds from last year.  Low germination rates are, I think, due to inconsistent temperatures.):

 

Sugar Rush Cream* - 61/75

Yellow Jalapeño/Jaloro - 73/75

Sulu Adana - 43/75

Bahamian Goat - 61/75

Yellow 7 Pod - 59/75

Papa Dreadie SB - 49/75

 

Planted 4/21 (a mix of my own (SS) and  others' seeds.  Germination is ongoing here.):

 

SS Papa Dreadie SB - 73

Yellow BJ - 3

Chocolate BJ - 1

Indian Carbon - 17

Mustard BJ - 9

Goronong - 8

Peach BJ - 0

Pluma - 18

FM Jalapeño - 19

Moruga Scorpion - 7

SS Thai - 0

SS smooth orange Scorpion - 23

 

*This one was a mystery to me last year.  I was calling it a trainer habanero (based on shape alone), but thanks to suggestions from Black Fatalii, I've been able to identify it as Sugar Rush Cream.  Wow, is this a great pepper.

 

No new pepper pics, but just to add some color, this native columbine is growing in a pot on a table under a maple tree in my front yard:

x0y2yw.jpg


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#43 BDASPNY

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Posted 02 May 2019 - 03:46 PM

how are the habanada growing for you? they're really slow growing but big producers once they get started.



#44 Kennylay

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Posted 02 May 2019 - 04:56 PM

i dont know that ive ever seen columbine, or noticed it enough to take mental note of it.  Quite the evolution on that thing, i might have to research it a little later.



#45 Sawyer

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Posted 02 May 2019 - 05:05 PM

how are the habanada growing for you? they're really slow growing but big producers once they get started.

They're coming along, only 23 or so days old, but I don't notice them lagging behind too much. I'll try to get some pictures up soon.

This 3 (4?) year old tepin is the first to go outside this year. If you look closely, you can see some flower buds. Assuming they go ahead and bloom and set berries, these will yield isolated seeds, further assuming the birds don't get them all.
o0860m.jpg

 


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#46 Sawyer

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Posted 02 May 2019 - 05:28 PM

i dont know that ive ever seen columbine, or noticed it enough to take mental note of it.  Quite the evolution on that thing, i might have to research it a little later.

It is a very cool plant, Aquilegia canadensis.  From Wikipedia, 

 

"The genus name Aquilegia is derived from the Latin word for eagle (aquila), because of the shape of the flower petals, which are said to resemble an eagle's claw. The common name "columbine" comes from the Latin for "dove", due to the resemblance of the inverted flower to five doves clustered together."

 

I'm a little surprised it's doing so well in a pot on a table.  You can see some in its natural habitat in this post in my 2016 glog.


Edited by Sawyer, 02 May 2019 - 05:30 PM.

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#47 BDASPNY

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Posted 03 May 2019 - 03:51 AM

They're coming along, only 23 or so days old, but I don't notice them lagging behind too much. I'll try to get some pictures up soon.

This 3 (4?) year old tepin is the first to go outside this year. If you look closely, you can see some flower buds. Assuming they go ahead and bloom and set berries, these will yield isolated seeds, further assuming the birds don't get them all.
 

 

 

 

glad to hear they're growing well for you. im only growing one this year that I ow from last year. its growing fast and I was picking buds off to encourage more growth before blooming.

 

 

 I got 3 tepin started from the pod you sent.



#48 Sawyer

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 11:42 AM

glad to hear they're growing well for you. im only growing one this year that I ow from last year. its growing fast and I was picking buds off to encourage more growth before blooming.
 
I got 3 tepin started from the pod you sent

The habanada plants look almost just like the white habanero plants at this point (second/third set of true leaves) and very unlike the much taller Sugar Rush Peach and Poblano on either side of them.

I think you've done well to get three tepin started. I planted a hundred seeds in one pot some time ago. One popped up in just a few days, then a few more a few days later. All told, twelve or thirteen have come up, but nothing in over a week or so. The soil has been cooler recently (moved the pot outside); I won't be surprised if more pop up later on when the temps heat up.

I sowed the last pepper seeds for the season using seeds you (BDASPNY) sent along with the habanada seeds. There were a few 0% germination square pots in a flat of "others", so I resowed them with peppers. Mostly the various cayennes and jalapeños, Anaheim, Gypsy, and Big Red sweet. What can you tell me about those last two?
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#49 BDASPNY

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Posted 06 May 2019 - 03:51 AM

The habanada plants look almost just like the white habanero plants at this point (second/third set of true leaves) and very unlike the much taller Sugar Rush Peach and Poblano on either side of them.

I think you've done well to get three tepin started. I planted a hundred seeds in one pot some time ago. One popped up in just a few days, then a few more a few days later. All told, twelve or thirteen have come up, but nothing in over a week or so. The soil has been cooler recently (moved the pot outside); I won't be surprised if more pop up later on when the temps heat up.

I sowed the last pepper seeds for the season using seeds you (BDASPNY) sent along with the habanada seeds. There were a few 0% germination square pots in a flat of "others", so I resowed them with peppers. Mostly the various cayennes and jalapeños, Anaheim, Gypsy, and Big Red sweet. What can you tell me about those last two?

 

the gypsy seeds are from a bonnie grown plant I got from lowes last year. the bonnie site has info on that one.

 

 

the big red sweet were seeds I saved from a store bought pepper I got last year. found them at lidl unfortunately all the info I have on those is it was large and had a good taste. we used them as a stuffing pepper. better than a regular bell pepper for sure.



#50 Sawyer

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Posted 06 May 2019 - 08:18 AM

We'll see what they produce this year. Gypsy is a hybrid, possibly Big Red, too.
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#51 Sawyer

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Posted 06 May 2019 - 08:18 AM

We'll see what they produce this year. Gypsy is a hybrid, possibly Big Red, too.
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#52 BDASPNY

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Posted 06 May 2019 - 08:30 AM

I believe red is the final color, but it changes several times. 



#53 Sawyer

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Posted 06 May 2019 - 02:34 PM

Too few pics here, let me try to fix that. All of these were taken yesterday. Of the OWs, only the tepin has perked up enough to warrant a photo:
od4ic.jpg
Hoping to get some isolated pods from this one before anything else starts blooming.
 
Except for the Golden Queen cantaloupe, these are all OS RBG:
23jk4xz.jpg
 
 
Except for the three pots in the back, these are all BBM:
5khh7d.jpg
 
PDN x BMJ up front, various tomatoes, and a few different varieties of peppers:
sm7e38.jpg
 
Multi-flat 1, all peppers:
28u3gjt.jpg
 
Multi-flat 2, all peppers:
11ht4co.jpg
 
Moving back inside, Habanadas front and center, miscellaneous elsewhere:
34dmzac.jpg
 
Some more Papa Dreadie SB, an assortment of bhuts and others:
1zd4084.jpg
 
Ending for now with a flat of mostly "others", but with some jalapeños up front and in the back:
29omz2d.jpg
The others include perennial potato onions from seed from Kelly Winterton, black goji, desert rose, monk fruit, a few others.  Whatever pots had 0% germination have been replanted with a last sowing of peppers.
 
I have about as many more photos of others already hosted.  I'll post them a little later.

Edit: Ten pic limit, right? I have eleven "others", so I'll stick the first one here. Alpharoma hops:
o8w037.jpg


Edited by Sawyer, 06 May 2019 - 03:13 PM.

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#54 Sawyer

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Posted 06 May 2019 - 04:13 PM

Part of my native woodland plants bed:

33dyu8n.jpg

Wake Robin up front, there's a lot of Solomon's Seal in there, too.  They are difficult to pick out because they look a lot like Solomon's Seal (and the Solomon's Seal is crowding them), but others in there include False Solomon's Seal and Large-flowered Bellwort.  Also present: Jack-in-the-pulpit, Bloodroot, a native yellow violet (with seed pods), and a Yellowwood tree seedling.  (Need to move that one.)  To the left and out of the frame is a small patch of Mayapple.

 

Just to the front right of that picture, at the base of a mulberry tree, are these Goldenseal with Jack-in-the-pulpit seedlings to the right of them:

2ed39mc.jpg

Those Jack-in-the-pulpit seedlings are uphill and around the tree from where a larger specimen dropped seeds a few years ago.  I assume ants moved them there, but it might have been a rodent.

 

This one doesn't look like much, but it may be my very favorite woodland forb, Cranefly Orchid, Tipularia discolor:

rs4qj4.jpg

The leaves die back right about now, then, with the right conditions, a beautiful little flower spike will pop up in September.

 

These ~100 Jack-in-the-pulpit seedlings are a rescue project:

2ew154m.jpg

 

As are these Solomon's Seal:

8wy3w1.jpg

 

Here's a tub of common violets:

2akl0cg.jpg

The grass-like stuff growing in there is saffron crocus.  That's about ready to go dormant for the summer.  There's a Mt. Hood hops plant in there, too.  You can see a leaf in the upper left corner.

 

Perennial walking onions:

33eiip5.jpg

These don't make a bulb and what's there can be pretty tough.  The top set bulblets are pretty tough, too.  But I've found that cutting the scapes for use in stir fry is a good sustainable way to use them.

 

Native elderberry, an unsung superfood?

2v0msl0.jpg

 

Shooting Star and Maidenhair Fern:

2rhmphh.jpg

 

More of the Columbine pictured somewhere up above: 

331gfw8.jpg

It's about done blooming for the year.  Don't know if it set any seed.  I hope so.  


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#55 wiriwiri

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Posted 06 May 2019 - 05:02 PM

Hey John..nice Woodies there...I should see if I can post my photos ..Imgur not cooperating.

I have some Jacks...now poking through the soil..some with green & some purple stems..

also we had some variegated  Solomon Seals.around & some with green stems but I have to check sometimes they get in

the way..& disappear ..have Bleeding Hearts pink/white...& we had the invasive white Lily of the valley..pulled those out.

I planted the pink variety but the moles/voles did away with those...I see one or 2 most gone ..those are not invasive IMO.

Lots of ferns growing wild...will have to get those photos up.

Woodies are nice in the Spring. ;)
 


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#56 Sawyer

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Posted 06 May 2019 - 05:20 PM

Hey John..nice Woodies there...I should see if I can post my photos ..Imgur not cooperating.
I have some Jacks...now poking through the soil..some with green & some purple stems..
also we had some variegated  Solomon Seals.around & some with green stems but I have to check sometimes they get in
the way..& disappear ..have Bleeding Hearts pink/white...& we had the invasive white Lily of the valley..pulled those out.
I planted the pink variety but the moles/voles did away with those...I see one or 2 most gone ..those are not invasive IMO.
Lots of ferns growing wild...will have to get those photos up.
Woodies are nice in the Spring. ;)

I've been using tinypic.com for hosting. Seems pretty stable (knock on wood), no registration required, but it's kinda tedious to upload the images then keep track of the image links.

Around here the variegated Solomon's Seal is an introduced alien species, but they and the natives both can become aggressively problematic.
I look forward to seeing your pictures.
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#57 Sawyer

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Posted 08 May 2019 - 09:50 PM

Took a bunch of 8' bamboo poles to a friend at her community garden plot yesterday. Helped her make a trellis out of them, not perfect but functional. Didn't think to take a picture; will try to remember next time I'm over there.

 

Gardener friend is growing a wild Brazil(ian) pepper. Another gardener is growing Charapita. I read they are different peppers, but the pictures of the berries sure look a lot alike. Anyone have any insight into the similarities and differences between these two peppers?

 

No pepper pic updates today, but here's a shot of some freshly sprouted moringa seedlings, taken today:

2lwac9h.jpg


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#58 Sawyer

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Posted 13 May 2019 - 10:29 AM

Late Easter, long, cold spring.

- Proverb

I'd add "wet" to that, too.

Edited by Sawyer, 13 May 2019 - 10:30 AM.

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#59 Sawyer

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Posted 13 May 2019 - 08:09 PM

Was 42°F this morning, but I think that's the last of the cool weather for the season... finally. For the foreseeable future, the lows are predicted to be in the 50s and 60s with highs in the mid 70s to lower 80s.

I think the last few nights in the 40s and a lot of cold rain were the nails in the coffin for the OW Bahamian Goat, but the rest of the OWs look like they'll make it. Pictures to follow when they have a little more new growth on them.

Today was dirt day for 3 BBMs and 3 Yellow 7 Pods. I skipped potting up; they went straight from a crowded 3.5" square pot to dirt, so they're pretty small. They went in hügelkultur "holes" that I established last year, three plants per hole.

I'll post pictures soon if the plants are still there tomorrow, i.e., if something doesn't eat them, walk on them, root them up, pull them up, crap on them, or any of the other myriad ways the universe comes up with to kill pepper plants. I put cardboard tube collars around them, so maybe the cutworms won't get them.
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#60 PaulG

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Posted 14 May 2019 - 02:42 PM

Gardener friend is growing a wild Brazil(ian) pepper. Another gardener is growing Charapita. I read they are different peppers, but the pictures of the berries sure look a lot alike. Anyone have any insight into the similarities and differences between these two peppers?

 

Sorry to clog the glog, but in response, John:

 

Here's a pic from 2014 comparing the Wild Brazil

and Charapita pods from my grow. The Charapitas

are more orange in color, but size and shape are

the same..

 

A small Charapita harvest.  wish I knew the latin name - difficult to track via google.  Any suggestions?:

_DSCN1632a_zps6cb7da37.jpg

 

And a small one of Wild Brazil.  Wish I knew the latin names of these, as swell.  Can't seem to find to via google:

 

_DSCN1633a_zps08445f2c.jpg


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