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Fermentation Vs. Boiling Chillis ?


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#1 Maverick27

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Posted 13 February 2019 - 03:16 AM

What is the overall effect of boiling fresh chillies  in hot water before blending as opposed to fermenting  (explained in Recipe for Cholula Sauce ) ?

 

http://thehotpepper.com/topic/70657-cholula-copycat-reciperecollection/ 

 

Quote:

You need to rehydrate the peppers after removing the stems and seeds. Bring some water to boil and then simmer them for about 20 minutes or until they are soft. Using more boiling water with some vinegar may help to dilute the capsaicin...

 

Does it reduce the pH level ?

 

What are the Pros & Cons of each process ?



#2 sinensis

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Posted 13 February 2019 - 05:22 AM

i don't see the word 'ferment' anywhere in that Cholula Copycat Recipe post?

 

fermenting gives a different flavor.

 

in that copycat recipe, vinegar (not the boiling process) is used to lower pH.



#3 SmokenFire

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Posted 13 February 2019 - 09:23 AM

I could be wrong, but I think they are discussing rehydrating dried peppers in that thread Maverick27.  Chile De Arbol and Pequin are frequently (usually) sold dried here in the states so soaking them in some boiling water rehydrates and releases their essential oils, etc into the sauce.

 

Boiling fresh chiles with other ingredients like garlic, onion & vinegar to make hot sauce is a perfectly acceptable process.  Many hot sauces are cooked.

 

Other hot sauces are fermented - that is the ingredients of the hot sauce (usually peppers, sometimes with additions like onion, garlic, carrot, etc) are either blended into a mash with salt (and sometimes starters) or are sliced and submerged in a brine - then left to ferment for a few weeks to a few months.  During this fermentation the lacto bacteria eat up sugar and spit out lactic acid, which creates an acidic enough environment to effectively preserve the ingredients.

 

   


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#4 ShowMeDaSauce

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Posted 13 February 2019 - 01:30 PM

You can boil your "mash" first either from dried or fresh but you will need a source of lacto bacteria after heating/cooling it. Ive done it a couple times and it worked fine. You really dont need to boil it though. Just enough heat to pasteurize is fine. Then start with a quality lacto culture for the ferment.



#5 Maverick27

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 12:03 AM

Thanks everyone for the heads up.  :P

 



#6 The Hot Pepper

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 12:44 AM

Rehydrating means adding the water content back into dried chilies so they appear fresh. Or any liquid can work except oils.



#7 Maverick27

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 01:19 AM

Reason for asking the qtn is I made a 'Olive Oil' based Italian Style Chilli Sauce.  

 

A local Italian restaurant owner, the sauce which he serves to clientele, disclosed the recipe to me.   

 

  1. Boil Chipotle Chillis (or Habs) in hot, salty water for 30 mins.   Allow to cool completely.
  2. Blend with garlic, vinegar, olive oil (3 Parts of Vinegar / 1 part Olive Oil), salt & black pepper.

The final product is a very nice tasting, smooth chilli paste that goes with Pies....etc..   :dance:

It tastes even better after 2-4 weeks when the chilli has blended in with the Olive Oil.

 

It's the bomb.  :onfire:   

 

 


Edited by Maverick27, 14 February 2019 - 03:42 AM.


#8 karoo

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 08:42 AM

Sounds good , did the sauce emulsify with the combination of vinegar and oil?

Does it stay consistent or does it separate?


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#9 Maverick27

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 10:49 AM

All ingredients blends in quite nicely to create a smooth, delicious sauce.

Trick is not too use much of the liquid ( Oil/Vinegar), just enough to form a thick ,smooth sauce.

Blending in small batches creates smooth sauce, instead of lumpy.

The sauce is delicious for a short duration ie 1 or 2 months, after which the 'wow' factor goes away.

I frequent the restaurant every month. I'll try to take a pic.

#10 The Hot Pepper

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 11:00 PM

Strange recipe! Does not sound Italian, and chipotles and habs are not interchangeable. Either it's a chipotle sauce, or hab sauce.



#11 sinensis

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 11:29 PM

nice, would love to see a pic

 

you make it with fresh chilies, correct?

or dried?



#12 karoo

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Posted 15 February 2019 - 02:48 AM

Strange recipe! Does not sound Italian, and chipotles and habs are not interchangeable. Either it's a chipotle sauce, or hab sauce.

 

You know he is correct,

 

Sounds more like a paste.

 


Edited by karoo, 15 February 2019 - 02:49 AM.

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#13 Maverick27

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Posted 15 February 2019 - 11:06 PM

It's more of a paste or condiment.

Definitely italian, since the base is olive oil.

#14 The Hot Pepper

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Posted 15 February 2019 - 11:27 PM

lollllllll that makes it Italian???






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