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#1 DontPanic

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 03:32 PM

I have a stump where I was discarding all my over-ripe and damaged peppers last year.  I was curious to see what kind of volunteers would grow here.

 

I covered that area over with some mulch, and turned it over a few times.  Aside from one night of freeze protection, I didn't do much else.

 

No laborious saving of seeds.

 

No fancy soil mixtures.

 

No heat mat and humidity dome.

 

No grow lamp.

 

And *NO* idea which of the 15-20 varieties of peppers I discarded last year are coming back here.

 

Of course there's a few weeds mixed in.  But there's a crate-load of peppers also.  :)

 

jjgfKOV.jpg

 

They're often coming up in dense clumps.

 

npko3zk.jpg

 

These poor fellas have some serious helmet head issues.

 

8N1pc7h.jpg

 

I'm guessing this one is a PDN x BMJ.  It's one of the few distinctive varieties at this early age.

 

SedcmZC.jpg

 

This is about a 4 foot by 2 foot strip of ground.  Is this too dense to grow a few dozen peppers?  :)



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#2 Uncle_Eccoli

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 03:54 PM

Outstanding. Following.

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#3 FITN

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 04:00 PM

That is awesome! You have definitely peaked my interest! I'll be following to see what you end up with.

#4 Sizzle Lips

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 04:33 PM

Just let them go and let nature take its course......you may be surprised at the results.....all I would do is hit them with water when needed.


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#5 jodytek

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 08:17 PM

Definitely following, looking forward to this thread


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#6 FITN

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 09:04 PM

PDN x BMJ?

#7 DontPanic

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 09:54 PM

PDN x BMJ?

 

 

Pimenta de Neyde crossed with a Bond ma Jacques.

 

It's a really cool looking pepper plant with a strong purple coloration.

 

There's a whole glog thread dedicated just to this cross:

 

http://thehotpepper....nda-ma-jacques/



#8 DontPanic

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 10:01 PM

Just let them go and let nature take its course......you may be surprised at the results.....all I would do is hit them with water when needed.

 

I'm going to try to do a little bit of both.

 

I'm going to leave most of them to grow out where they are.  And I'm going to transplant a few of them.

 

The spot where they're germinating is very shady, and not very large.  It's also slowly collapsing since the tree root underneath is rotting away.

 

So, it's not an ideal spot, and there's so many growing in that one spot, transplanting a few of them won't even dent the population.



#9 DontPanic

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Posted 09 April 2019 - 05:46 PM

I've had a lot of nights with temperatures in the 40s.  Everything seems healthy enough, but very little progress until the night time temperatures began to warm up.

 

Here's a picture from a few days ago (4/5):

 

eorFw8Z.jpg

 

A few have really big leaves, leading me to speculate there are some Chinense or Baccutums in there.

 

I0COpCF.jpg

 

I replanted a bunch of seedlings into starter pots.  Since I have 60-80 seedlings in this little spot, it really didn't even thin it out much.

 

In order to avoid disturbing the soil too much, I just plucked them out.  Some came out perfectly OK.

 

p7I2VQ2.jpg

 

Some others suffered a bit.

 

vjpvE98.jpg

 

Since I have so many seedlings, I wasn't too worried about mangling a few.  I still got enough seedlings from this plot, and I didn't have to disturb the soil hardly at all.



#10 DontPanic

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Posted 10 May 2019 - 06:56 PM

Things haven't been progressing as fast as I would have hoped.

 

It's been a month since my last post, and the progress has been hit and miss.

 

The plot of seedlings is coming along slow.  It's in a very shady spot, and the night-time temperatures have been somewhat cool.  They're also getting decimated by bugs.

 

8dWpke6.jpg

 

Here's a close-up of some of the bug damage.

 

xFJDBDK.jpg

 

I'm more rigorous about keeping after the pests in my planned beds.  But in this spontaneous, in-ground spot, I'm reluctant to nuke the entire area with some sort of bug-killer.

 

Of the seedlings I transplanted out of the in-ground patch of stump peppers, the progress has been all over the place. A few quickly became big enough to transplant, and are doing pretty well:

 

prLDbgo.jpg

 

A few more look healthy, and are just now getting big enough to transplant:

 

VQdJxFX.jpg

 

I've already thrown out a few, and many of the remaining transplants are coming along slow.  Perhaps my rough method of transplanting these seedlings caused more damage than I thought.

 

IE3I46q.jpg

 

I'm still really enjoying playing around with these peppers, but I've been surprised with the attrition.  If I do this again, I may not worry as much about preserving the original bed, and I'll just dig in deep to get better transplants.

 

I'm a little perplexed by the wide difference in progress.  I think there's something causing some of these plants to grow so slowly, but I haven't nailed down any theory yet.

 



#11 Uncle_Eccoli

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Posted 10 May 2019 - 07:58 PM

This is one of my favorite threads.

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#12 jodytek

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Posted 10 May 2019 - 08:19 PM

Nature has a way


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#13 windchicken

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 08:48 AM

Mitch, this could be my garden! Especially with Texas Pequin, I find that after a year or two of planting it in the same spot, it always comes back on its own...In fact, all my attempts to eradicate it from a certain bed in my big garden have met with failure, so this year I finally ceded that ground to the mighty Pequin, and officially christened it the "Pequin Bed...."

 

If I may ask, where on the Gulf Coast are you?



#14 dragonsfire

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 09:08 AM

I would throw some Oyster spores on the stump, enhances the nutrients and dissolves the stump over time.



#15 DontPanic

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 02:23 PM


If I may ask, where on the Gulf Coast are you?

 

I live in Mobile, AL.

 

 

I would throw some Oyster spores on the stump, enhances the nutrients and dissolves the stump over time.

 

There were two stumps in that location.  I had been using Sodium Nitrate as well as a commercial stump rot product.

 

One of the stumps disintegrated nicely.  That's where the peppers are popping up.  The other stump is being a little more stubborn, but it'll get there eventually.

 

There's already a variety of mushrooms growing out of the decaying wood (the Sodium Nitrate certainly helped).  If the spot was more sunny, it would be fantastic for peppers.  As it stands now, it's great for making pepper seedlings, but not so great for actually growing peppers.



#16 DontPanic

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Posted 09 June 2019 - 06:21 PM

The rest of my pepper garden is doing good.  Unfortunately, my stump peppers have been hitting several obstacles.

 

The stump plot itself just isn't making much headway.  It's just too shady, and the pepper plants are having trouble getting big enough to shrug off the pests.

 

KVHnjkW.jpg

 

All those leaves and mulch that were so beneficial for starting the seedlings are now turning into a haven for pests and weeds.

 

For right now, I'm just going to let it go (other than trying to keep the weeds down to a low roar).

 

I got 17 transplants out of the stump plot, but those have been languishing.  I switched potting soil brands (to Penningtons) right before I started transplanting stump peppers.  The rest of my pepper crop did OK (using my first brand of potting soil), but just about everything I potted up in Penningtons is not growing at all.  Most of my stump pepper transplants stayed exactly the same size as when I posted on May 10th.

 

I'm not sure it's the Penningtons, but as soon as I potted a few of these up into regular mulch, they started doing much better.  Unfortunately, they are all so small, they're still really susceptible to pests.

 

I have a few that are doing pretty good:

 

X3Hfahz.jpg

 

One of these looks like some kind of annuum, and the other looks like a chinense.  But I'll have to wait until they start putting out some pods to say for sure.  They'd be much further along if I hadn't had so many problems with my potting soil this year.

 

I have two more that are just beginning to get up a head of steam.

 

VavUMN3.jpg

 

This slow growth is totally uncharacteristic of the rest of the peppers I sowed from seed this year.

 

I just potted up the rest, but they are still almost the same size they were on May 10th.  I didn't even bother getting picture of those.

 

All in all, things could be worse.  The rest of my pepper crop is coming along fine.  And I'm re-learning a valuable lesson about the importance of having a reliable potting soil solution.






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