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#1 CraftyFox

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Posted 04 July 2019 - 01:29 PM

I know the mother of these was a super hot, but I forgot to label it and have no clue which of the supers it came from. I had Butch T, Red Ghost Bhut, and a Carolina Reaper, it looks nothing like any of them but I've got no complaints with the way they are shaping up. 

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#2 willard3

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Posted 05 July 2019 - 06:50 AM

This should be posted in "Pepper ID"


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#3 Doelman

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 08:12 AM

I believe that's a Carolina Butch Ghost



#4 SpeakPolish

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 06:17 PM

This should be posted in "Pepper ID"

Does it? It is probably a hybrid, so it is not a documented pepper which people are able to identify.

#5 The_NorthEast_ChileMan

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 09:18 PM

Does it? It is probably a hybrid, so it is not a documented pepper which people are able to identify.

 
I'm trying to figure out a nice way to explain to an 18 year old how to respect those that have more years growing & studying hot peppers than he's been alive. OK, I'll do this NICE this time.
 
obviously you don't know that even hybrids will have characteristics that can help ID the genetics of pepper species.
 
obviously you don't know that flowers can help ID species.
obviously you don't know that leaf characteristics can help ID species.
obviously you don't know that fruit per node can help ID species..
obviously you don't know that a constricted calyx can help ID species.
obviously you don't know that plant growth characteristics can help ID species.
obviously you don't know that fruit phenotype can help ID species.
 
So exactly what do you know with your vast experience growing and studying hot peppers for a few years? (Willard & I have over 50 years combined.)
 

confused-teenage-boy_m8hvgl.jpeg
 
 
Yea, that's what I thought.

 
And that's the last time I'll be nice in my responses to your ignorance.


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#6 FreeportBum

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Posted 11 July 2019 - 06:27 AM

 
I'm trying to figure out a nice way to explain to an 18 year old how to respect those that have more years growing & studying hot peppers than he's been alive. OK, I'll do this NICE this time.
 
obviously you don't know that even hybrids will have characteristics that can help ID the genetics of pepper species.
 
obviously you don't know that flowers can help ID species.
obviously you don't know that leaf characteristics can help ID species.
obviously you don't know that fruit per node can help ID species..
obviously you don't know that a constricted calyx can help ID species.
obviously you don't know that plant growth characteristics can help ID species.
obviously you don't know that fruit phenotype can help ID species.
 
So exactly what do you know with your vast experience growing and studying hot peppers for a few years? (Willard & I have over 50 years combined.)
 

confused-teenage-boy_m8hvgl.jpeg
 
 
Yea, that's what I thought.

 
And that's the last time I'll be nice in my responses to your ignorance.

 

You and willard are a couple of jerk off's...lol     



#7 Bicycle808

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Posted 11 July 2019 - 10:27 AM

If we're talking about the *species, I feel pretty sure that's Capsicum chinense in the OP.

Guessing which exact cultivars are involved in the cross might be a bit harder to do.

I haven't been growing peppers for all that long, but I've been playing around on internet forums for ages. When daily post counts are a low as they are these days, it may not be very helpful for users to police one another about using the wrong sub-forum or conducting a thorough search before posting.

To me, it seems best to help out if you can and just keep the discussion going. That's just my opinion, but I think we can all agree that it's more fun to talk about chiles rather than talking about forum etiquette.

You are entering the buttocks with the spicy hand of Chinese pepper? And pleasure from this low pepper? I am not sure but the scorpion pepper musk when raw, is the sexual experience. This is granted, and evident in the taste, and the woman jealous. 


#8 SpeakPolish

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Posted 11 July 2019 - 12:05 PM

 
I'm trying to figure out a nice way to explain to an 18 year old how to respect those that have more years growing & studying hot peppers than he's been alive. OK, I'll do this NICE this time.
 
obviously you don't know that even hybrids will have characteristics that can help ID the genetics of pepper species.
 
obviously you don't know that flowers can help ID species.
obviously you don't know that leaf characteristics can help ID species.
obviously you don't know that fruit per node can help ID species..
obviously you don't know that a constricted calyx can help ID species.
obviously you don't know that plant growth characteristics can help ID species.
obviously you don't know that fruit phenotype can help ID species.
 
So exactly what do you know with your vast experience growing and studying hot peppers for a few years? (Willard & I have over 50 years combined.)
 

confused-teenage-boy_m8hvgl.jpeg
 
 
Yea, that's what I thought.

 
And that's the last time I'll be nice in my responses to your ignorance.
I was just debating semantics. Also using experience is not an excuse. There is something called the internet, and it helps way more than decades of growing. I now have the knowledge of millions of years of growing.

In any website that has instruction for pepper ids, they almost all have those descriptions.
I searched google for (How to identify pepper species). Here is the first result. It has everything that you just described. https://www.ehow.com...per-plants.html

#9 CraftyFox

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Posted 11 July 2019 - 12:51 PM

Wowzers!!
I actually did think about posting this to the ID forum, but identification wasn't my first thought in posting this.. I wasn't sure it could be "Id'd".  Not that I'd have any objections to it being moved to the ID forum. I can certainly see the merits in having it there. I actually posted it here because I thought posting it there could create a potential conflict..
Go figure.
I will say that the only variegated pepper I had last year was a 'Candy Cane', which is Annuum. 
These seeds definitely came from a Carolina Reaper, a Bhut, or a Butch T, none of which had blunt ends like some of these pods. 
I've kind of ruled out Butch T in my mind because the pod remains were wrinkled heavily. 
I'm stuck on Bhut x Candy Cane, which seems unlikely.. Given they were on the opposite side of the area from each other. 
MFr6xphl.jpg

U325pAWl.jpg



#10 CaneDog

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Posted 11 July 2019 - 01:43 PM

Hey CF!  My input would be that I see some ruffled leaf edges which is so common on bhuts. Not super scientific, but given that and the elongated pod shape, I might suspect a bhut was involved.  


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#11 Pr0digal_son

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Posted 11 July 2019 - 07:28 PM

 My input would be that I see some ruffled leaf edges which is so common on bhuts.  

 

The second most accurate comment in this thread,right behind the one posted by FreeportBum. Definitely see some Indian genes in those leaves. 



#12 willard3

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Posted 12 July 2019 - 07:55 AM

I was just debating semantics. Also using experience is not an excuse. There is something called the internet, and it helps way more than decades of growing. I now have the knowledge of millions of years of growing.

 

 

If it smells like poop and looks like poop, it's poop


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#13 SpeakPolish

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Posted 12 July 2019 - 02:27 PM

 
If it smells like poop and looks like poop, it's poop

Unless you got some real bad chocolate

#14 Ruid

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Posted 12 July 2019 - 03:23 PM

Imagine how well a political or religious discussion would go here. Lol

#15 MisterBigglesworth

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Posted 13 July 2019 - 05:59 AM

The pods look very smooth compared to the super hots you have listed in the original post. Did you have any varieties of C. Chinense last year with smooth pods?
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#16 CraftyFox

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Posted 13 July 2019 - 09:00 AM

I was just debating semantics. Also using experience is not an excuse. There is something called the internet, and it helps way more than decades of growing. I now have the knowledge of millions of years of growing.

In any website that has instruction for pepper ids, they almost all have those descriptions.
I searched google for (How to identify pepper species). Here is the first result. It has everything that you just described. https://www.ehow.com...per-plants.html

You do realize that if you follow that link, and then trace the information back a step, you end up right at Paul's door, right? 

 

 

So exactly what do you know with your vast experience growing and studying hot peppers for a few years? (Willard & I have over 50 years combined.)
 

 

I know that you are, at least in part, responsible for helping get that Capsicum key out there, even though it seems to be dated and in need of refinement. Still appreciate it and look forward to understanding the relation of pedicels soon. Any links you could toss me related to understanding that? Or perhaps a link to a more inclusive key? I'm more interested in the pedicels though, as the key becomes kinda broken without a solid understanding. Kinda surprised there isn't a good thread on here about it.. Or am I missing it?

 

The pods look very smooth compared to the super hots you have listed in the original post. Did you have any varieties of C. Chinense last year with smooth pods?

I thought that was odd too, as I recall the Bhuts being wrinkled from the start.. 

I had some Orange Habs, but they weren't the mother of these, because the pod remains I gathered the seed from was red and wrinkled. The Candy Cane variety I suspect being the cross was a smooth type with an elongated block bell style and variegation, similar to some of the pods these are throwing. 2 of my other ones have started setting pods now so it'll be interesting to see what shapes dominate those, and if the variegation actually holds out. Then I've got another plant in a bigger pot that is just starting to bud out..

Given the lack of tail, I can't believe these came from the Reaper or the Butch T.. The tips on a good chuck of them, as well as the shape, are very reminiscent of the Bhuts I had last year. Butch T Trinidads were actually really smooth though.
This is the total list, if I can recall correct.
Supers: Carolina Reaper, Trinidad "Butch T", Red Bhut
Hots: Orange Hab, African Devil
Annuum: Cajun Belle, Candy Cane x 2



#17 Bicycle808

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Posted 13 July 2019 - 09:52 AM

If you think you collected the seeds for these from a SuperHot pod, but you were growing around variegated annuums and standard Orange Habs, it's possible that it crossed with one of those smooth-azz emmer-effers, and it's likely that would be enough to cause the progeny to have the smooth appearance.

I'm not trying to be a jerk; I use THP on a little shitty phone, so I can't see pictures very well, but is the plant from the OP variegated at all?

You are entering the buttocks with the spicy hand of Chinese pepper? And pleasure from this low pepper? I am not sure but the scorpion pepper musk when raw, is the sexual experience. This is granted, and evident in the taste, and the woman jealous. 


#18 CraftyFox

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Posted 13 July 2019 - 03:01 PM

If you think you collected the seeds for these from a SuperHot pod, but you were growing around variegated annuums and standard Orange Habs, it's possible that it crossed with one of those smooth-azz emmer-effers, and it's likely that would be enough to cause the progeny to have the smooth appearance.

I'm not trying to be a jerk; I use THP on a little shitty phone, so I can't see pictures very well, but is the plant from the OP variegated at all?

It has some pin stripes for sure, both plants.. Don't see those on any of my other plant's pods. Or maybe I'm just seeing things.. Anyone else see it?



#19 SpeakPolish

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Posted 13 July 2019 - 04:54 PM

You do realize that if you follow that link, and then trace the information back a step, you end up right at Paul's door, right? 
 
I know that you are, at least in part, responsible for helping get that Capsicum key out there, even though it seems to be dated and in need of refinement. Still appreciate it and look forward to understanding the relation of pedicels soon. Any links you could toss me related to understanding that? Or perhaps a link to a more inclusive key? I'm more interested in the pedicels though, as the key becomes kinda broken without a solid understanding. Kinda surprised there isn't a good thread on here about it.. Or am I missing it?
 
I thought that was odd too, as I recall the Bhuts being wrinkled from the start.. 
I had some Orange Habs, but they weren't the mother of these, because the pod remains I gathered the seed from was red and wrinkled. The Candy Cane variety I suspect being the cross was a smooth type with an elongated block bell style and variegation, similar to some of the pods these are throwing. 2 of my other ones have started setting pods now so it'll be interesting to see what shapes dominate those, and if the variegation actually holds out. Then I've got another plant in a bigger pot that is just starting to bud out..
Given the lack of tail, I can't believe these came from the Reaper or the Butch T.. The tips on a good chuck of them, as well as the shape, are very reminiscent of the Bhuts I had last year. Butch T Trinidads were actually really smooth though.
This is the total list, if I can recall correct.
Supers: Carolina Reaper, Trinidad "Butch T", Red Bhut
Hots: Orange Hab, African Devil
Annuum: Cajun Belle, Candy Cane x 2

Exactly. Paul said I did not know those stuff. And I proved him wrong with a single Google search.




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