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Why am I getting Carolina reapers so late?


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#1 Codeman

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Posted 13 August 2019 - 08:30 PM

Hello,I also wanted to ask why is my Carolina reapers growing so late in the season? Just now getting some growing and I planted them in the spring. Lots of flowers but not a whole lot of peppers growing.

#2 Ruid

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Posted 13 August 2019 - 08:36 PM

I've yet to grow anything, but a lot of the people here start their supers indoors in December or January. They use a box fan or an oscillating fan and give them limited outside time to harden them off and move them outside when the time is right.

It seems like you just didn't realize that you planted them late. Superhots take longer.

#3 Codeman

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Posted 13 August 2019 - 09:10 PM

I've yet to grow anything, but a lot of the people here start their supers indoors in December or January. They use a box fan or an oscillating fan and give them limited outside time to harden them off and move them outside when the time is right.

It seems like you just didn't realize that you planted them late. Superhots take longer.

Does it matter if they're in the ground or pots?

#4 Edmick

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 12:12 AM

It's normal. The archives here are usually pretty helpful with questions like these. Tons of posts regarding the same exact question

#5 podz

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 03:25 AM

Both chinense and pubescens are long-season species in my experiences with growing them; chinense even perhaps a bit longer than pubescens.

 

If you germinate at end of March, do not have any expectations to get ripe pods before mid-October. Chinenses generally don't produce a damned thing until they are already the size of a large bush. They also seem to me to be quite slow and lazy unless the temps are really warm as in constantly above 25c (77f).

 

It really doesn't matter if they are in a pot or in the ground so long as the roots have a healthy environment with enough space to expand. I don't grow chinenses in anything smaller than a 30 litre (7.5 gallon) pot, and that is when using coir which IMO doesn't require anywhere near as much pot as compared to growing in soil. When I grew chinenses in soil, the container size I used was 80 litres (20 gallons).



#6 juanitos

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 08:09 AM

7 pots / scorpion (reaper's parent) are from Caribbean long season is normal for them.

 

We have to fake it here by starting them indoors in jan / feb so they will have more time to fruit.


Edited by juanitos, 14 August 2019 - 08:10 AM.

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#7 Doelman

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 08:35 AM

Both chinense and pubescens are long-season species in my experiences with growing them; chinense even perhaps a bit longer than pubescens.

 

If you germinate at end of March, do not have any expectations to get ripe pods before mid-October. Chinenses generally don't produce a damned thing until they are already the size of a large bush. They also seem to me to be quite slow and lazy unless the temps are really warm as in constantly above 25c (77f).

 

It really doesn't matter if they are in a pot or in the ground so long as the roots have a healthy environment with enough space to expand. I don't grow chinenses in anything smaller than a 30 litre (7.5 gallon) pot, and that is when using coir which IMO doesn't require anywhere near as much pot as compared to growing in soil. When I grew chinenses in soil, the container size I used was 80 litres (20 gallons).

I have to disagree, it really depends on your location.  Here in the SE US, if I start chinense in March, I'm typically getting ripe peppers anywhere from July-August.  I'm in 7b/8a here, this year I started reapers March 1st, planted out April 20th, harvested my first ripe pod July 14th.  I just harvested 1/2 lb of ripe reapers from 4 plants last week.



#8 juanitos

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 08:40 AM

I have to disagree, it really depends on your location.  Here in the SE US, if I start chinense in March, I'm typically getting ripe peppers anywhere from July-August.  I'm in 7b/8a here, this year I started reapers March 1st, planted out April 20th, harvested my first ripe pod July 14th.  I just harvested 1/2 lb of ripe reapers from 4 plants last week.

 

you heat up faster / get more sun in the spring than lots of us.

 

if you can see podz is from finland and considers 80F warm :P


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#9 Doelman

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 08:56 AM

 

you heat up faster / get more sun in the spring than lots of us.

 

if you can see podz is from finland and considers 80F warm :P

I saw that, can they even grow peppers in that arctic tundra??? :)

He was responding to OP who also lives in 7b so if he's starting reapers in March and doing everything properly, there's no reason he shouldn't see ripe pods by August at the latest.



#10 dragonsfire

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 09:17 AM

I find were I am that the hotter the pepper the longer it takes, Its gotten to the point with the weather that the Habs dont have enough time to ripen before it gets cold here.



#11 ShowMeDaSauce

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 10:27 AM

The only supers i started myself are just now starting to pod. The supers including Reapers i got as seedlings are already producing nice ripe pods. Got lots of ripe bonnets i started also. I start seedlings in Feb through March and only a few later. Ive got odd ball Naglah that took forever to germinate and went outside late. Got a really nice pull of that plant just recently and it has a bunch more turning.


Edited by ShowMeDaSauce, 14 August 2019 - 10:29 AM.


#12 acs1

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 10:27 AM

I have to disagree, it really depends on your location.  Here in the SE US, if I start chinense in March, I'm typically getting ripe peppers anywhere from July-August.  I'm in 7b/8a here, this year I started reapers March 1st, planted out April 20th, harvested my first ripe pod July 14th.  I just harvested 1/2 lb of ripe reapers from 4 plants last week.

 

Pretty much the exact same for me...
 



#13 Codeman

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 10:35 AM

I saw that, can they even grow peppers in that arctic tundra??? :)
He was responding to OP who also lives in 7b so if he's starting reapers in March and doing everything properly, there's no reason he shouldn't see ripe pods by August at the latest.

what the hell is going on then. Could it be using too many different fertilizer could be the problem?

#14 podz

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 12:46 PM

I saw that, can they even grow peppers in that arctic tundra??? :)

He was responding to OP who also lives in 7b so if he's starting reapers in March and doing everything properly, there's no reason he shouldn't see ripe pods by August at the latest.

 

Helsinki is in equivalent to USDA 7a, 500 miles south of the arctic circle and about 780 miles south of any arctic tundra :-)

 

We actually have far more sunlight than anywhere in the USA except for Alaska, which is on our same level.

 

But alas, with chinenses, it's all about really warm weather and we don't have so much of that here. Our average summer temps are around 68-70f, ocassionally getting up to 78-85 and very rarely any hotter than that.



#15 juanitos

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 02:28 PM

what the hell is going on then. Could it be using too many different fertilizer could be the problem?

 

do you have pictures of them from spring > now

 

show us a timeline of pictures we can kinda guess.


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#16 Codeman

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 07:30 PM

 
do you have pictures of them from spring > now
 
show us a timeline of pictures we can kinda guess.


This one in June.
Those three in the back are the reapers.

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#17 Codeman

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 07:35 PM

 
do you have pictures of them from spring > now
 
show us a timeline of pictures we can kinda guess.

The biggest tallest reaper in the back.

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#18 Codeman

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 07:40 PM

Guessing nitrogen lockup.

#19 podz

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 11:49 PM

I'm guessing it's because you've pulled all of the lower leaves off and only left a top canopy. That works with annuums, but never seen it work with chinense.



#20 solid7

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Posted 15 August 2019 - 08:10 AM

Both chinense and pubescens are long-season species in my experiences with growing them; chinense even perhaps a bit longer than pubescens.

 

Not if you get warm temps.  Chinense will take off like a rocket in higher temps and humidity - the kind of weather that will grind many other varieties to a halt. 

.

I could see Pubes growing faster where you're at, but here, It takes me about 3-4 months to first pod, from a seedling plant out for chinense.  My first Pube took somewhere between 9 months and a year to set the first pod.


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