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Mr. West

Member Since 11 Jun 2018
Offline Last Active Yesterday, 03:33 AM

#1620932 Beginner's guide to AACT/Compost Tea

Posted by Mr. West on 18 March 2019 - 07:37 PM

Today at 2PM, I started brewing a batch of compost tea with the following recipe.

5 gallons of water 
15 mL hydrolyzed fish and seaweed
1 tsp TM-7
5 mL molasses
Xtreme tea (kelp powder and compost source)
 
The more nutrients are included in a tea, the more important it is to have strong aeration components that keep the dissolved oxygen levels constantly high.
My air pump setup is pretty effective, and I’m not adding many nutrients, just a little molasses and a 1 gal regular strength dosage of neptune’s harvest 2-3-1
My tea should not be in high demand of oxygen since the nutrient concentration is so low. 
I have not tried it yet, but I have heard good things about using the hydrolyzed fish as a food source for fungi. 
The molasses is barely any, because I don’t want the tea to become bacteria dominant.
It’s my first attempt with this type of recipe, adding a variety of bacteria and fungus foods. 
One concern I had about my ingredients is the high levels of sulfur overall. The TM-7 is a lot of humic and fulvic acid chelators with micronutrients including a lot of sulfur and trace metals. The recommended dosage on the package for container gardening and compost tea is (1/4-1/3 tsp) / gal. I used 1 tsp, about a gram of it. I think the fish hydrolysate and seaweed also has notable Sulfur and Zinc levels.



#1620227 Fish fertilizer

Posted by Mr. West on 15 March 2019 - 10:59 AM

With seedlings at 2-3 sets of true leaves in a seed starting mix you could probably feed half strength at every other watering. Or you could make up a weaker solution and give it to them at every watering/feed. 1/4 - 1/3 strength of their recommended application rate (15 mL/gal.) So, 1/3 is about 1 tsp/gal. or 5 mL and 1/4 would be about 4 mL/gal. 

I have some seedlings around that stage, and I have given them neptune's fish and seaweed 2-3-1. 

I use it sparingly, because I don't think it's ideal to supplement a lot of Phosphate at the seeding stage. I'm sure its a good to use occasionally, but I probably wouldn't make it their only food. I think excess P will cause them to stretch more in height. 

Instead, I sometimes feed my seedlings with compost tea, and I'll alternate with worm castings and molasses tea. Both 1-0-1.
If you're going to continue giving them that liquid feed, I recommend alternating it with another that has more soluble N and available K. Or add a nitrogen and potassium-rich soil amendment like alfalfa or kelp meal or just a slow-release fertilizer.
The only issue with using slow-release N in the soil is that, if there is too much N left in the soil during flowering it can cause blossom drop.
That being said, I think your 2-4-1 is a liquid feed ratio that would be best used in flower.
For the seedling and vegetative stage you really want to begin fertilizing by increasing soluble N and growing leaves before the plant matures and begins to flower.
During flower and fruit set, P is in much higher demand and the plant stretch that it enables is natural with the upper nodes of the canopy already forking.
I am using the same product on my mature plants that are podding up.



#1620118 7 Pots & Scotch Bonnets (2018- )

Posted by Mr. West on 14 March 2019 - 07:57 PM

dorset naga

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7 pot barrackpore

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bbg7  large

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7 pot

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#1620007 pot worms?

Posted by Mr. West on 14 March 2019 - 10:00 AM

I'm bubbling the worm tea this time, and I've added molasses. Because these castings contain living worms, I'm guessing there may be some beneficial bacteria in them. So, without taking much effort to hook up the large bucket brewer, I'm using a small aquarium pump with one stone in a pint size water bottle. I'm making this for seedlings. After it brews, I will let it settle to check for the worms. Maybe I will strain it if i see any of them. I read that one species of these worms is aquatic. Apparently, they thrive in waterlogged, acidic soil. 




#1619733 pot worms?

Posted by Mr. West on 13 March 2019 - 08:34 AM

I haven't farmed worms. It sounds like these are ok to have in a worm bin, but too many is a sign of acidic pH and soggy soil.

Maybe it's from poor environmental/quality control by the supplier. It's encap brand earthworm castings.

Because they are apparently mass produced and I bought them off a shelf, I was assuming they were void of any life... at least, more sterile than fresh small batch worm castings.

The packaging and company website say nothing about beneficial bacteria, or cocoons, or these white worms.




#1619695 pot worms?

Posted by Mr. West on 13 March 2019 - 12:00 AM

I was making tea from earthworm castings, just by steeping them overnight.

I noticed there were small white worms in the sediment at the bottom of the bottle.

At first, I thought they were from cocoons that had hatched. 

I found an article about pot worms that might explain them better.

I'll be researching more. Input is welcome.

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#1618471 Looks like a big problem

Posted by Mr. West on 08 March 2019 - 10:53 AM

I don't think it's N deficiency. The affected leaf on the scotch brain is in the middle, not the bottom. Whatever it is, from the first picture to the last, that leaf seems to be experiencing early senescence and natural abscission. The plant is mobilizing the assimilates/stored carbs from that leaf and preparing to detach it. Sometimes this happens because of inadequate light. In the recent picture, that leaf appears to be on the side not facing the window. Could be that leaf isn't producing as many photosynthates as it requires for maintenance. So, being a net loss in energy, the plant diverts its stores to the leaves with a higher photosynthetic capacity (younger leaves or those receiving more light).

 

Is that plant topped? I don't see a new growth tip.

 

Another possibility is that there was some sort of root damage and the plants got rid of leaves to reduce the demands of transpiration on the roots.




#1618303 Discolored Leaves?

Posted by Mr. West on 07 March 2019 - 04:21 PM

I agree with karoo. It's the light intensity, not the heat. Purple isn't typical for those types, but they're only slightly tinged. Raise the light as you go. You're pretty much in the sweet spot since they aren't stretching nor are they really sunburnt. Nice work.




#1617186 anyone able to shed any light on what could be going wrong

Posted by Mr. West on 03 March 2019 - 09:23 AM

Oh shit it totally looks like a weed. The flower structures have burrs on them. Some type of hitchhiker was probably stowaway in your potting mix. 




#1617179 anyone able to shed any light on what could be going wrong

Posted by Mr. West on 03 March 2019 - 08:34 AM

Ya, the leaf tips are round. The buds look unusual too, but they're out of focus. So, idk...

I would guess it's overwatered. Looks pekid and yellow with droopy leaves.




#1616834 CaneDog - Off-Season Season 2018/19

Posted by Mr. West on 01 March 2019 - 10:11 AM

You should save some seeds on that one. I bet the next generation is even more doper.




#1615815 Trident’s SB 2019 “keeping the faith”

Posted by Mr. West on 24 February 2019 - 06:29 PM

 

 

 

I think the Lenin Starburst is the red version. Never heard of the "Lenon" starburst through.

 

Sry, couldn't resist.

 

The Lennon starburst is the version that looks like the color imagery from lucy in the sky with diamonds. "Cellophane flowers of yellow and green". 




#1615813 Diagnosis Request?

Posted by Mr. West on 24 February 2019 - 06:20 PM

The 2 SGO look burnt, and the ones above and to the right look slightly burnt too.

I use fish at that stage. (Very dilute. Just a few drops in a pint. Enough to lower the pH of distilled water.)

But I usually play it cautious.

Is that algae?




#1615810 Habanero Seedlings Won't Bend Toward Light

Posted by Mr. West on 24 February 2019 - 06:02 PM

Probably you want to have them closer to the light. Whether that means raising the seedlings or lowering the lamp.

Also, I would slide the seed coat off those cotyledons. It's pretty easy if you hold the leaves with one hand and the pull the casing away with the other hand.




#1615165 7 Pots & Scotch Bonnets (2018- )

Posted by Mr. West on 22 February 2019 - 10:53 AM

7 pot yellow

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devil's tongue

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goat

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bonda ma jacques, bbg7, sb moa

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