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jhc

Member Since 02 Dec 2013
Offline Last Active Today, 03:20 AM

Posts I've Made

In Topic: Pepper sauce

Today, 02:29 AM

What's the recipe????


In Topic: Steps to ensure safe hot sauce

Yesterday, 02:56 AM

I never had that happen. I have had a jambalaya and a beef stew scorch at the bottom becauseI left it on the heat too long without stirring. Sad! or Bad! (I have experienced the superheated phenomenon many times using a microwave, however). 

 

FWIW, the simmer definition I posted was because I was unaware of what I think is the technical definition. I have not tested this, but I'm not sure there's a temperature difference between a gentle boil (lots of bubbles every second but the liquid isn't totally agitated) vs a rolling boil. 

 

Here's what I feel confident in:

 

Botulinum toxin (NOT SPORES) is killed at 10 minutes at anywhere from a simmer to a boil

http://ucanr.edu/sit...afety/Botulism/

 

Cooked sauces made fresh won't have any toxin in them unless you are using spoiled ingredients. Ferments MIGHT (even though probably won't). I know people keep fermented mashes/sauces in the fridge and eat them without cooking. People also ride around without seatbelts. The risk is probably the same. FWIW the FDA recommends all home-canned veggies (even those pressure-canned) be boiled before eating. Overkill? Maybe.

 

So what else are we killing? Well just about anything else will die at 160F, including the big three of E. Coli, Listeria, and Salmonella. Lactobacillus too, for those that need to stop a ferment so the bottles don't explode. A "simmer" is minimum 180F

https://www.ars.usda...ations/p328.pdf

 

Here's what I take away from this: if your sauce is boiling, by which I mean there are many bubbles coming up every minute, for at least a few minutes, you have killed the relevant nasties except for botulism spores. For a cooked sauce, as long as your pH is <4.0, you should be fine. For a ferment, where you can never know if the pH dropped before botulism had time to reproduce, you should cook at least 10 minutes at a boil (gentle is fine) to ensure all toxin is gone.

 

If anyone has better info, then please share. Like SalsaLady and the other folks here, I'm only trying to share accurate information that people can use to keep everyone safe.

 

 


In Topic: Fermenting Peppers 101

Yesterday, 01:08 AM

I've always heard complete darkness is optimal. If it comes down to you not having enough space in a cabinet or something, leave it on the counter and throw a dish towel or T-shirt over it, maybe?

I know a single anecdote might not be really useful, but just in case, I will point out I've been doing my ferment on top of the fridge in a good amount of light 18ish hours out of the day and as far as I can tell, it's fermenting fine. 

 

YMMV, IMHO, etc....


In Topic: Hello! Making my first mash

Yesterday, 01:03 AM

I don't use any kind of whey or starter, just a 5% brine and let mother nature do its thing. I don't grind up the peppers either, I slice them in half or into big chucks, depends on the pepper really. Pic is Cayenne and Onion

 

 attachicon.gifcayenne_onion.jpg

Is that for an eventual sauce or whole lacto-pickled peppers/onions?


In Topic: Another First Masher Here

Yesterday, 12:28 AM

Welcome to the forum SoHot!

I wonder what the forum experts say about a pure green Jalapeno ferment... enough sugars in the peppers alone?