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outdoors a fishing thread

CaneDog said:
Nice kayak redfish action boarider.  Been too long since I've done any of that.  What were you catching them on?
I only fish artificial. It was a tough day in the marsh on crazy low tide, pushed mud most of the day. But the reds started getting on the mudflats to warm up once the sun was out for a while, then I just sighted casted them in a foot of water, Buggs lures are my choice for sight casting, kinda like a fly but for your rod and reel.
 

CaneDog

Extreme Member
Really awesome man!  Great way to spend some time on the water. I used to fly fish for them in the banana river / mosquito lagoon when I lived in Florida, so very similar, but the drive from Seattle would be a bit much to get there now.
 
I love this guy.
 
But I reckon he carries way too much gear.
 
Still pert dang awesome.
 
And the Firebox is the sheeit!
I used to traumatize little fish for a living.
 
Now I do it for fun.
 
 
Love the one you're with.
 
 
 
 
 
 
60 kayak tournament today.
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D3monic said:
 
Snakehead fishing has been one of my full-time hobbies, as of late.  There is so much BS about these things.  Not one place that they've "invaded" have they actually taken over the ecosystem.  To the contrary, they mix in well, and add a nice bit of diversity.  Plus, they're absolutely delicious.
 
If the "Catch and Release" lobby didn't have so much money tied up in their very profitable hobby, we'd probably view this species in a whole different light.  They're 10X the sport fish that Largemouth Sunfish are.  Anybody that gets a chance to target them, and likes to fish, should never miss the opportunity.  Take note of how many of the species that they're "wiping out" you catch, in the course of the outing. ;) 
 
CaneDog said:
Really awesome man!  Great way to spend some time on the water. I used to fly fish for them in the banana river / mosquito lagoon when I lived in Florida, so very similar, but the drive from Seattle would be a bit much to get there now.
 
Come on, now...  It's only a 4 day trip by car, if you really leg it.  I've done it a few times.  What's your excuse?  Maybe you just don't like fishing that much.  :D
 

CaneDog

Extreme Member
solid7 said:
 
Come on, now...  It's only a 4 day trip by car, if you really leg it.  I've done it a few times.  What's your excuse?  Maybe you just don't like fishing that much.  :D
 
Ha.  Just 63 hours if you stop only to gas up, and with Boarider posting those redfish pics it's getting damn tempting.  How are you catching those snakehead and what type of gear are you using?
 
CaneDog said:
 
Ha.  Just 63 hours if you stop only to gas up, and with Boarider posting those redfish pics it's getting damn tempting.  How are you catching those snakehead and what type of gear are you using?
 
Pretty much the same gear as you'd use for bass.  A good frogging rod is all you need...
 
solid7 said:
 
Snakehead fishing has been one of my full-time hobbies, as of late.  There is so much BS about these things.  Not one place that they've "invaded" have they actually taken over the ecosystem.  To the contrary, they mix in well, and add a nice bit of diversity.  Plus, they're absolutely delicious.
 
If the "Catch and Release" lobby didn't have so much money tied up in their very profitable hobby, we'd probably view this species in a whole different light.  They're 10X the sport fish that Largemouth Sunfish are.  Anybody that gets a chance to target them, and likes to fish, should never miss the opportunity.  Take note of how many of the species that they're "wiping out" you catch, in the course of the outing. ;) 
Introduced fish species,specifically Salmonids,generate 10s of millions in revenue for this state. 99% of the people catching them have no idea that they are not endemic. Their introduction has greatly decreased the native char in our waterways but has also added angling opportunities plus tons of money as I mentioned already.

What's ironic is that our state continues stocking hatchery fish over naturalized and thriving populations and it is hindering their numbers,ruining the gene pool and introducing gill lice and other diseases. In this case it isn't the catch and release lobby,but the beer guzzling,littering,kill everything in site crowd who bully the legislative body into keeping up with this silly practice because their grandpappy has been doing it since the 40's.

We have snakeheads here also. The biggest issue I have seen with them so far is that the same lot I mentioned above are killing every bowfin they come in contact with because of ignorance. Bowfin are another native here that is suffering at the hands of these hillbillies. I will try to post photos of some carnage I have come across. I have a photo of 10 or 12 dead bowfin laying on the ground under a sign like the one posted here describing the difference between the two species.
 
Pr0digal_son said:
In this case it isn't the catch and release lobby,but the beer guzzling,littering,kill everything in site crowd who bully the legislative body into keeping up with this silly practice because their grandpappy has been doing it since the 40's.
 
I see an equivalence relation here.  One is the constituent of the other.  We are talking about exactly the same people.
 
The fish they support is not a native species.  And maybe we're saying the same thing in different ways...  But my firm belief is that ecosystems change, have changed, and will continue to change.  Sometimes, the overall health of the larger ecosystem takes priority over the health of the economy that said ecosystem drives.  We might not like what displaces something, but once it happens, you deal with it. (not through ignorance, but realism)  Sometimes, a more balanced, and healthier ecosystem emerges.
 
The snakehead issue is not what it's been made out to be.  My biggest problem in the whole debate - in any debate - is that if you (and I don't mean you, specifically, I mean everyone, in general) use any half-truths to make talking points, your whole argument is a lie.  Many of the talking points were generated by an economically interested lobby.  So there is no public trust, and a guaranteed eternal debate.
 
The responsibility for the destruction of the native species lies with your lawmakers, who, instead of handling the situation intelligently, put out the call to arms to the ignorant masses.  Rather than containing the first found populations of snakeheads in the north - quarantining and studying them in isolation - the used Rotenone to nuke an entire pond, and then panicked the general population with media bulletins.  By the time they found the problem, it was already endemic, and uncontainable.  But the seeds of ignorance were well planted...
 
Catchem' up y'all.
 
I have not yet.
 
Wet a line this year.
 
Damn you house remodeling!
 
And damn you on me.
 
For forgetting.
 
Its not about the house.
 
The job.
 
The this or that.
 
Its about the wife.
 
The dog.
 
And fishing.
 
In that order.
 
But mrs. blues.
 
And Trouble happened.
 
I am.
 
Over ruled.
 
solid7 said:
 
I see an equivalence relation here.  One is the constituent of the other.  We are talking about exactly the same people.
 
The fish they support is not a native species.  And maybe we're saying the same thing in different ways...  But my firm belief is that ecosystems change, have changed, and will continue to change.  Sometimes, the overall health of the larger ecosystem takes priority over the health of the economy that said ecosystem drives.  We might not like what displaces something, but once it happens, you deal with it. (not through ignorance, but realism)  Sometimes, a more balanced, and healthier ecosystem emerges.
 
The snakehead issue is not what it's been made out to be.  My biggest problem in the whole debate - in any debate - is that if you (and I don't mean you, specifically, I mean everyone, in general) use any half-truths to make talking points, your whole argument is a lie.  Many of the talking points were generated by an economically interested lobby.  So there is no public trust, and a guaranteed eternal debate.
 
The responsibility for the destruction of the native species lies with your lawmakers, who, instead of handling the situation intelligently, put out the call to arms to the ignorant masses.  Rather than containing the first found populations of snakeheads in the north - quarantining and studying them in isolation - the used Rotenone to nuke an entire pond, and then panicked the general population with media bulletins.  By the time they found the problem, it was already endemic, and uncontainable.  But the seeds of ignorance were well planted...
Very similar fish here. Looks like a shitload of fun.

https://flylordsmag.com/2019/04/17/7-things-you-never-knew-about-the-wolf-fish/
 
Wolf fish.
 
I've never seen them.
 
Or caught them.
 
Sounds like a northern pike.
 
Or a musky.
 
Wannabe.
 
They eat baby ducks ya' know.
 
Because.
 
Baby ducks.
 
Or your your big toe dangling off the dock.
 
Pike and musky.
 
Don't give a shit.
 
I picked the worst northeast U.S. weather in more than 100 years for this time of year to go on a fishing trip!  I saw some signs, but didn't reschedule the trip. The forecast for the Catskill Mountains has been way off in the past, so last Friday, I packed up my gear and prayed for the best.  Saturday was a relatively nice day, maxing out around 61 F.  Others on the lake had decent catches.  I just had no luck at all.  I did land this Pickerel with a modified Meeps spinnerbait - I removed the treble hooks (too weedy to fish with) and replaced it with a single weedless hook.   The Pickerel was exactly what I was targeting with the shiny, unfortunately fifteen inches is the New York State minimum for Pickerel, so I had to throw it back:
 
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Getting upset as I post - I love eating these,  Good non-fatty, rich white meat.
 
I got a few bites worm fishing, but couldn't bring anything else in.
 
Not too many fish to show off this post, so enjoy some pretty pictures of the lake:
 
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I woke up Sunday in the middle of a spring Nor'easter!  It was 39 F with 15 MPH winds and raining hard.  I didn't feel like going home and there was nothing else to do, so I headed back out to the lake.  Conditions were so bad that the guy renting boats questioned whether I really wanted to go out.  Nobody else was there.  Undeterred, I bailed out some water, loaded my tackle and took off.  I got a few bites worm and bobber fishing, but couldn't land anything.  After an hour and a half, my hands were too cold and numb to continue, so I docked the boat and headed to town to pick up some waterproof fishing gloves.  The guy selling them to me called me crazy.  I returned to the lake and fished for another two hours without getting any bites.  I can deal with a lack of productivity, but the conditions were too much:  I was getting cramps and starting to uncontrollably shiver.  In addition, the heavy rains were causing me to have to bail out water at regular intervals.  It was time to head back to shore and give up for the day.
 
Monday was just as cold; not getting past 42 F at any point in the day.  I had contemplated cutting the trip short by one day, but since it wasn't expected to start raining until the afternoon, I decided to stick around and shore-cast with worms from another lake.  After two hours of nothing, I finally got a keeper, this nice-sized Bluegill.  We grow our panfish big in New York State - I've caught bigger as well.
 
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Say goodnight.  The party's over:
 
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That was it for the day and the trip.  I stuck around another two hours or so; at least one of them in the pouring rain, but got nothing else.
 
Here is nice picture of that lake:
 
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I'll probably be back in June.  I'll wait until the at least the 15th, when Bass season opens.
 
Hoping to have many more fish to show off for future posts.  I do hope that I've entertained the readers with the story.
 
 
 
Pike.
 
Bluegill.
 
Two of my favorite fish.
 
I love to be loving.
 
Traumatizing them for sport.
 
Or eating.
 
That bluegill in the second to last pic.
 
Fried sandwich size.
 
And don't skimp on the tartar.
 
The lemon squeezin's n' pleazins.
 
And hot sauce.
 
Some would say.
 
Thats peasant food.
 
But its the food of kings.
 
I have a Jewish friend.
 
With a Mexican name.
 
He agrees.
 
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