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American cars and fuel economy

AlabamaJack

Extreme Member
you just thinking...heck, your country is only about 100 miles wide and 200 miles long or so...back when I was growing up, if we didn't have that far to go, we would just walk or use the mule and wagon.... ;)















***hope you see I am just kidding***
 
you just thinking...heck, your country is only about 100 miles wide and 200 miles long or so...back when I was growing up, if we didn't have that far to go, we would just walk or use the mule and wagon.... ;)

***hope you see I am just kidding***

Haha, good one... i'll get you for this....sometime.... maybe....probably not :dance: :party:
 
Gas is 3.65 here in SE PA. Crap my firebird gets about 5 around town and 8 on the highway and cant pull a thing. It does however do 0-60 in 2.4 seconds and 0-115 in 12.5 seconds, so its fun to drive. I only drive it 2000 miles per year though.
 
Petrol - USD$1.8 per liter / USD$6.8 per gallon
Diesel - USD$2 per liter / USD$7.5 per gallon
Minimum wage - USD$5.4 per hour / USD$1,000 per month
Tax on vehicles - 113%-128% (17% sale tax not included)

We live in a time when people need to choose between gas and food.

EDIT:
Apparently tonight the prices of all types of gas will increase in USD$0.1 per liter and about USD$0.4 per gallon. "yay"...
 
40 avg mpg here on a 2012 Fiesta.
Hovers around $4 a gallon in the middle of nowhere.

Gotta remember, the E.U. population (to a greater or lesser extent, depending on country) funds most of their social programs by charging extra taxes.

Fuel is only one of them.

I think I remember recently reading Germans (maybe another) pay an average of 52% of their income in taxes.
 
40 avg mpg here on a 2012 Fiesta.
Hovers around $4 a gallon in the middle of nowhere.

Gotta remember, the E.U. population (to a greater or lesser extent, depending on country) funds most of their social programs by charging extra taxes.

Fuel is only one of them.

I think I remember recently reading Germans (maybe another) pay an average of 52% of their income in taxes.
Most of the taxes are actually higher here. :(
 
2005 Diesel Jetta in the winter without the AC cranked I get right at 45mpg. Even though its a VW, I'm pretty sure it was made or at least assembled in Mexico.
I can remember the days when diesel was cheaper than gas....like back when I bought the damn thing! $3.62/gallon last fill up.
 
I'm seeing some numbers and assumptions about income that don't jive with the data. Income statistics are tricky but some of you might want to review the data. The reason I am not showing stats is they are a google search away and I don't want to nitpick each example. There is no perfect statistic. The U.S. is not the wealthiest nation but incomes are going to be higher than Australia, Denomark or Canada. Maybe one month the median worth of Canadians tops the U.S. but that is a housing bubble and not the same as income.

To give you some idea look at the consumption of U.S. poor http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2011/07/what-is-poverty.

Despite the reputation the U.S. is one of the most progressive nations in the world. It has the second highest corporate tax rate in the world. The bottom 50% pay almost no income tax and when you account for income transfers they pay a negative income tax of 5%. http://gregmankiw.blogspot.pt/2012/07/progressivity-of-taxes-and-transfers.html. Poor people get free medical treatment.

I'm not chest thumping. I believe in a short period of time these stats will carry a certain irony. We are in a state of decline and our debt has reached a point of no return.
 
When the debts of the planet are greater than the assets of the planet, I would say the U.S isn't the only country with a problem.

When 1/2 the population receives some form of government aid, when 1/2 the population works for the government-----I better quit now before I go off.
 
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