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Anyone else growing dwarf tomatoes?

This is my first year growing in the PNW, and I wasn't really thrilled by the prospect of my first short growing season in 20 years.  I was a little put off by growing peppers this year, because I don't have tons of space, and I opted not to get a tent.  So I decided to get some tomatoes going.  But I didn't want full size tomato plants, so I decided to do a patio grow with dwarf tomatoes.  Some are varieties that I know and love, others are brand new to me.  I don't super love growing tomatoes in containers, but all in all, these have treated me pretty well, so far.
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Perennial favorite: Cherokee Tiger Dwarf
New favorites: Tasmanian Chocolate, Sweet Scarlet
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I really like the huge rugose leaves of the Sweet Scarlet, and the Tasmanian Chocolate - while I haven't tasted them yet - were the first to develop fruit, and have really that really nice beefsteak shape, but in a smaller (yet still full) size.
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Grow list:
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Aftershock
Tasmanian Chocolate
Sweet Scarlet
Lime Green Salad
Velvet Night
Firebird Sweet
Cherokee Tiger Dwarf
 
 
 

Bou

Extreme Member
Hi Solid!
 
First time grower of dwarf tomato plants here; I tried the Uluru Ochre, a yellownish-brown beefsteak variety that is supposed to be quite tasty! The seedlings were by far the healthiest looking of all the 14 strains I have this year, with thick stems and dark + luxurious green foliage. The strange thing is that they grew quite tall as you can see in my pics (my cages are 5 ft tall  x 2 ft wide)... Up to now the production is maybe a bit over average but summer isn't over yet!! I think I will give other dwarf a try in the upcoming years. Wish you a good harvest out of yours ;)
 

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Those are really nice!  Man, there just is no substitute for growing tomatoes in ground. (beds or soil)  Mine are definitely going to produce, but I'd sure love to see them bush out a bit more. Not sure if that's the climate here, the containers, or both. I didn't plant out until June, so maybe I got a bit of a late start, too. 
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Thanks for sharing. I should have some good seed stock this year, so when your season is done, if you want to do a trade, let me know.  I bought mine as plants, due to time and space constraints, and they were pricey!  I'm gonna get maximum return out of these. (lots of seed stock)
 
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Bou

Extreme Member
All rigth, I'll keep that in mind!! I started mine around mid-march and planted out last week of may (bit of a gamble here as we had a late frost the next week which affected some of my pepper plants that were not well covered...).
 
Here's the other non-dwarf I'm currently growing (mostly beefsteak) in case some might interrest you: Alice's Dream, Anna Russian, Brad's Atomic grape, Elser's brown derby, Everett's rusty oxheart, Laos Ghost, Oaxacan jewel, Black Krim, Northern green, Sgt. Pepper, Spike (big cherry type), Stupice & Summer of love
 
S7, I believe that your current zone is slightly longer than mine (N. Oregon).

I have done tumbling Tom in the past with good results.

This year I'm doing golden gem (parks seed) in both 6.5 gal container and ground. Both doing well. I'd say they r a bit bigger than dwarf, but may stay small. One of my buckets is at about 4 ft. But it is thirstier than I expected.
I had a few volunteers from '19, and I Left a few, and they r cranking too.

Both varieties produced about the same. I've been picking for about 2 weeks.

Seem to taste similar. Hell, I really do not like tomatoes all that much. But, throw these little sugar balls on the grill, and snack down.

The Tom's go well through September, and only get sweeter. I expect the same from the gems, as they appear to be very similar. They seem to be productive, hardy, and tasty.
 
Bou said:
All rigth, I'll keep that in mind!! I started mine around mid-march and planted out last week of may (bit of a gamble here as we had a late frost the next week which affected some of my pepper plants that were not well covered...).
 
Here's the other non-dwarf I'm currently growing (mostly beefsteak) in case some might interrest you: Alice's Dream, Anna Russian, Brad's Atomic grape, Elser's brown derby, Everett's rusty oxheart, Laos Ghost, Oaxacan jewel, Black Krim, Northern green, Sgt. Pepper, Spike (big cherry type), Stupice & Summer of love
 
That's a nice list.  Definitely love the black Krim (well stocked with those) and the stupice aren't my favorite, but I do greatly appreciate their vigor and early fruit set.  When I grow stupice in Florida, the fruit are always sort of cubic shaped, for some reason. (with thick walls)
 
 
fishhead said:
S7, I believe that your current zone is slightly longer than mine (N. Oregon).

I have done tumbling Tom in the past with good results.

This year I'm doing golden gem (parks seed) in both 6.5 gal container and ground. Both doing well. I'd say they r a bit bigger than dwarf, but may stay small. One of my buckets is at about 4 ft. But it is thirstier than I expected.
I had a few volunteers from '19, and I Left a few, and they r cranking too.

Both varieties produced about the same. I've been picking for about 2 weeks.

Seem to taste similar. Hell, I really do not like tomatoes all that much. But, throw these little sugar balls on the grill, and snack down.

The Tom's go well through September, and only get sweeter. I expect the same from the gems, as they appear to be very similar. They seem to be productive, hardy, and tasty.
 
Dang, I would have never believed that we'd have a longer season here.  I was just down your way this weekend. Went to Painted Hills and Smith Rock.  It was 103 degrees on the way back.
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Geez, I should have remembered you were down that way, and gave you a shout.
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I had some micro varieties that I wish I would have brought out here with me.  Those would have been fun, and I could have even put them under a small grow light.
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Back home, I grow tomatoes from November to May. (2 crops)  But I like heirloom varieties, and there's always some damn problem.  (I'm stubborn - the varieties that grow well in my region, are not the ones that I like)  So, basically, I plant a shit load of stuff that isn't really well suited for the area, and leverage the power of numbers.  I lose a lot to various fungus and whatnot, since we tend to get cold rainy days in our winter.  By contrast, the dry warm days, and cool nights would be so good for tomatoes here - if only there was just another month and half of prime growing season.
 
Chewi said:
Hell man, I didn't know you moved! Left coast even!!!!
 
Oh, no, I didn't.  Well, not permanently, anyway.  I almost always maintain 2 residences.  Still live in Florida, but this is my temporary, this time out.  Actually, it's the second time out here.  I did a stint out here for 8 months in 2017/18.  Did some time in Georgia for 8 months after that.  Looks like I'm going to see out the remainder of the year here. 
 
solid7 said:
 
Oh, no, I didn't.  Well, not permanently, anyway.  I almost always maintain 2 residences.  Still live in Florida, but this is my temporary, this time out.  Actually, it's the second time out here.  I did a stint out here for 8 months in 2017/18.  Did some time in Georgia for 8 months after that.  Looks like I'm going to see out the remainder of the year here. 
Cool. Glad you are able to grow something up there. I always imagine it being overcast all the time.
Peace!
 
Chewi said:
Cool. Glad you are able to grow something up there. I always imagine it being overcast all the time.
Peace!
 
No, the summers are actually really nice up here.  Just too damned short!
 
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