• Politics are not permitted. There's plenty of places to discuss that elsewhere, and a hot pepper forum is not the place. Thank you for respecting the community!

Are there any more on THP???

I have several healthy addictions in my life of which hot peppers is probably at the top of the list. A close second is GEOCACHING!!! I'm just wondering if there are any other chilehead geocachers on THP?

If you don't know what geocaching is, put simply it is a worldwide game involving the GPS (Global Positioning System). The game involves one person hiding a container or geocache (containing a logbook, some tradeable items, pens, etc.) and posting the geographic coordinates online for other players to find. The other players use a handheld GPS receiver to find the hidden container and sign the logbook with their user name (I'll give you one guess what mine is). The geocache or cache, can be disguised as just about anything imaginable from 50 Cal. ammoboxes down to containers that look like the head of a bolt (known as a nano cache). I've even found a cache disguised as a piece of fake rubber dog poo... :sick:

Anyway, if you are interested in learning more, check out this link:
GEOCACHING.COM


p.s. Thanks RS67Man, I was a dumbass and wrote "Geographic" instead of "Global."
 
I've done caches that involve rock climbing, 10+ mile hikes, kayaks, ascending gear, rappelling gear, swimming, etc. I've seen some of the most beautiful places on the planet that I never would have known existed without it. I can bring my children and let them find the more family friendly ones. Geocaching is AWESOME!!!


WARNING!!! Highly addictive!
 
Yep, done some GCing myself, have a Garmin Oregon 300 GPS, and a account at geocaching.com, user name RS67Man. I have not been active due to finance issues, but may get started again later this year because I have my old job back.

BTW, GPS is "Global Positioning System"........... Not trying to be a smarty pants or anything......
 
Actually, I had a mate tell me about it once while we were out on a hike. We were all geared up to give it a shot and don't know what happened but I completely forgot about it till now!
 
Wow sounds interesting. Is it something teenagers could do on their own? I think it would be fun for a my nieces and nephews.
 
BTW, GPS is "Global Positioning System"........... Not trying to be a smarty pants or anything......

:banghead: Ok, now I really feel like a schmuck (I'm so good at doing that to myself). I just finished working with a GIS (Geographical Information System) program and my head wasn't in the right place. I'll edit the original post. Thanks for the correction!
 
Wow sounds interesting. Is it something teenagers could do on their own? I think it would be fun for a my nieces and nephews.

Most definitely! This is a great activity for kids to do to keep them out of trouble. I'm currently a co-mentor of the Student Geocaching Club at Penn State University. You can get a starter GPS receiver on eBay for cheap and basic membership to GC.com is free!
 
Most definitely! This is a great activity for kids to do to keep them out of trouble. I'm currently a co-mentor of the Student Geocaching Club at Penn State University. You can get a starter GPS receiver on eBay for cheap and basic membership to GC.com is free!

Thanks for the info. I just read that you can use an "app for that" with an android phone so no extra equipment needed to purchase.
 
Hey Nova...just FYI, these are all the geocaches around Hunter Valley.

Capture.jpg
 
One of the biggest rules in geocaching is, IT IS NEVER BURIED! Some are very cleverly hidden, especially those in urban and city locals. There are caches that are nothing more than a tiny waterproof container that measures 3/8"X3/8".....called a micro. All it has in it is a tightly rolled up strip of paper that you must sign (I just put down "RS67Man") to show you found it. I have also found large caches that are made from extra large ammo boxes. With those there are trinkets for the kids to trade, trackable items that you move to another cache in another location, maybe a notebook log that asks you to put down a few words about the hunt you just had and sometimes more. Another big rule is to leave more than you take, always leave the cache richer and in better shape than you found it.
 
SoFlo Posse used to do this several years ago. It was really fun stuff. Don't know why we quit this. I used to do it in Arizona in my trusty steed Rosinante all alone. Some of those caches were many many miles into the desert. Some of it was a bit nerve intensive. Sadly, I still have some pretty cool travel bugs that NEED to be returned to a new cache. I think I'm on one dudes HATE list. Gotta git 'er done.
 
Top