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Bhut jolokias with stingers

I know it's not particularly strange or rare for bhut jolokias to have stingers, but I have a plant that seems to uniformly produce pods with pretty marked stingers. Has anyone had this before?

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There are about ~15 full sized pods on the plant and every one has a nice little stinger on it as far as I can tell. I thought they were pretty cool looking, so I'm going to save some separate seed from this plant.
 
Quite common... on any C. chinense, actually.

I don't know you figure that. Most chinenses maybe 1 out of 100 have a tail. Most bhut jolokias it's maybe 1 out of 20. Even with Scorpions it's maybe 50%. You've seen an habanero plant produce pods that all have tails?
 
I don't know you figure that. Most chinenses maybe 1 out of 100 have a tail. Most bhut jolokias it's maybe 1 out of 20. Even with Scorpions it's maybe 50%. You've seen an habanero plant produce pods that all have tails?
"stingers" as you put it, is the result of the flower petals staying on the pod. many things cause it, including the weather and other factors such as humidity etc. I have seen many Habanero plants will all pods having "stingers".
 
"stingers" as you put it, is the result of the flower petals staying on the pod. many things cause it, including the weather and other factors such as humidity etc. I have seen many Habanero plants will all pods having "stingers".

Yeah I know that, but obviously there is a very strong genetic component involved too, otherwise they would appear at similar rates on different varieties. I've never had a chinense plant exclusively produce stingers, not even a Trinidad scorpion.
 
I agree with the genetic tendency, and I think it is why most "stingers" are on C. chinense plants.
 
They really look closer to Naga Morich than Bhut Jolokia. Close cousins to be sure, but not quite the same. The bhut's that I have grown over the past few years (NMSU CPI) are longer and way bumpier than those shown above.
 
They really look closer to Naga Morich than Bhut Jolokia. Close cousins to be sure, but not quite the same. The bhut's that I have grown over the past few years (NMSU CPI) are longer and way bumpier than those shown above.


Thank you...least someone agrees with me.
 
I know it's not particularly strange or rare for bhut jolokias to have stingers, but I have a plant that seems to uniformly produce pods with pretty marked stingers. Has anyone had this before?


I have a plant this year that's putting off pods like that. It's from my own bhut jolokia seeds and the other 5 plants I have going don't look like it at all. I assumed it crossed with a Caribbean Red last season and I have a cross :?:
 
Well, I agree they don't look like the archetypal shape for a bhut jolokia, at least not if you consider the CPI strain to be that (and I'm not sure why it should be considered the standard anyway). But that's what they were labeled as when I received them so that's what I'm calling them, and the heat and flavor are exactly the same so it's kind of splitting hairs just because the pod shape is a little different. It's not like bhut jolokia is an extremely uniform and clearly defined variety anyway. It doesn't look like it so much in the picture, but they are very bumpy and not shiny or smooth like an habanero. I have Naga Morich plants as well and they look a little bit different than these. I also have some that came from seeds labeled "Assam Bhut Jolokia" (don't remember the source) and they produce longer, skinnier, and bumpier pods a lot more reminiscent of the CPI bhut jolokias. I'll post some pictures of those tomorrow. I do like the look of the longer, skinnier, bumpier ones more but for culinary purposes it's a crapshoot.
 

Pepper-Guru

Extreme Member
Well, I agree they don't look like the archetypal shape for a bhut jolokia, at least not if you consider the CPI strain to be that (and I'm not sure why it should be considered the standard anyway). But that's what they were labeled as when I received them so that's what I'm calling them, and the heat and flavor are exactly the same so it's kind of splitting hairs just because the pod shape is a little different. It's not like bhut jolokia is an extremely uniform and clearly defined variety anyway. It doesn't look like it so much in the picture, but they are very bumpy and not shiny or smooth like an habanero. I have Naga Morich plants as well and they look a little bit different than these. I also have some that came from seeds labeled "Assam Bhut Jolokia" (don't remember the source) and they produce longer, skinnier, and bumpier pods a lot more reminiscent of the CPI bhut jolokias. I'll post some pictures of those tomorrow. I do like the look of the longer, skinnier, bumpier ones more but for culinary purposes it's a crapshoot.
I hear ya. As long as they have that pungent body odor/ cheesy aroma then they are close enough. I got these seeds from a Bhut plant in Assam along the river so, its the original real deal. There are two different names anyways with two different ideologies of origin. Some Indian claim they are of Naga orgigin and some claim Bhutan origin. So....either way I can tell you that if your bumps are not towering out to a fine point like a fine whipped cream does then it is probably not the "original sin". :)
 
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