frutescens Earliest Thai Pepper Varieties?

I realize that "Thai pepper" could describe virtually any pepper that traditionally hails from Thailand, but what I'm referring to, specifically, is the roughly 2in long, skinny red peppers, with a quick dry heat, sold in all the grocery stores in the Metro-Vancouver region. Everyone here calls them "Thai" peppers regardless of whether not that's what they actually are. I don't know about other regions, but in my area, these are used in everything from Cantonese, Vietnamese, Filipino, Malaysian and Indonesia cooking. So, my question is (you're probably noticing a predictable pattern to my questions on this forum by now) what varieties have you found that match the above description that set fruit and ripen up relatively early? As has been mentioned by a number of people, earliness can vary from climate to climate; although I'm interested in hearing about everyone's experience, regardless of climate, I'm especially interested in remarks from growers in the PNW, the UK and Ireland, Scandinavian regions, Tasmania, and similar regions (that is, with temperate, cool to cold oceanic climates). However, if you, say, live in a high desert region where you need to get your plants harvested before summer drought and heat set in, that might be of interest as well. Cheers.
 
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Don't know the name of the actual selection but I bought some Thai peppers (prik kee noo) at a market, I took some seed and planted some and the yield is early and massive.

I just call them Thai Sky.

Often forms for sale in markets perform amazingly.
 
Don't know the name of the actual selection but I bought some Thai peppers (prik kee noo) at a market, I took some seed and planted some and the yield is early and massive.

I just call them Thai Sky.

Often forms for sale in markets perform amazingly.
Prik Kee Noo is the variety that I repeat the most in my crops. I find them to have a deep, fragrant flavor that very few have. The burn is very good too, about 80-100k shu and quite durable.
This year they destroyed my stomach!
Ripening was normal, neither early nor late. But the production was tireless, I also harvested tons of it.
 
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In addition, to doing well in almost any condition, they are very tough. This year, we had here 3 months of temperatures between 70 and 85 ° F and between 80 and 90% air-humidity. All the plants suffered from fungi infections. Some didn't respond well to treatment. Thai peppers recovered within one week!
In addition... a plant that gives you 200 pods per season ... if it yields at 50% it is still giving you a great production.

Looks like we're starting to build an international lobby about Thai peppers... I'll make the damn Europeans eat spicy! jejejeje
 
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