misc f@#$ it im drinking ;)

Still haven’t had a day off in... I don’t remember. Drinking the regular Ardbeg 10 and now Jameson because after a couple, it ain’t about taste and nuance anymore.

I heard yesterday that single malt scotches are going up 25% after feb 1st due to tariffs? I grabbed a Laphroaig, Ardbeg, Talisker, all 10 year and a Lagavulin 8 and 16 in a panic after work. I wanted to grab a Port Charlotte too but it was gone. It’s never going to be enough but I have to try.
 

luvmesump3pp3rz

Extreme Member
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drinking and self quarentening! :drunk:
 
Do enjoy Grants myself now and then due to Dangler’s recommendation... very quaffable...

A guy I work with said Finagrens Irish whisky (only $20 a fifth at Hy Vee here) was worth a try. Killed half of a bottle and I agree. Seems like a whisky of dubious origin though. The name reminds me of Hennigans scotch from Seinfeld lol
 
seems like a decent choice for an old fashioned, more often than not it probably would have been a Canadian rye whisky when it really took off as a cocktail .

fromwhat I have read , I the whole point of "the old fashioned way "of drinking whisky , was to rectify the questionable quality of the booze available at the time
 

peppersproutfarm

Extreme Member
seems like a decent choice for an old fashioned, more often than not it probably would have been a Canadian rye whisky when it really took off as a cocktail .

fromwhat I have read , I the whole point of "the old fashioned way "of drinking whisky , was to rectify the questionable quality of the booze available at the time
The whistle pig 10 single barrel has a pretty high proof. A little bit of simple syrup cuts down on the ethanol up front. And the aromatics from bitter seem to pair very well with the spiciness of the rye on the finish. The whiskey neat is a bit rough and on the rocks is good but I prefer that little bit of aromatics along with it.
As with all history, and especially whiskey history, competing stories abound. Some say that the drink actually originated in Louisville, Kentucky in 1880 at a private social club called The Pendennis Club. The recipe is linked to bartender and bourbon distillery, James E. Pepper. Rumors link Pepper to The Pendennis Club before he allegedly brought the cocktail to the Waldorf-Astoria hotel bar in New York City.
 
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