scovilles Fresh Fresno vs Habanero

Habanero's might not be "super" hots but they're pretty damn hot. Fresno's by comparison, if one were to use the scoville scale, are mild.

There is a variable here, FRESHNESS.

I pulled another immature Fresno from one of my plants today. It has HEAT. Granted, it doesn't sear the way a Hababero does. Also, the Hab's I have access to are store bought, I suspect they live on the shelf for a while, besides who knows how long it is from field to table.

So with the intensity the Fresno brought today I have to say that I am beginning to fear the Hab that I have growing right now (probably has in the neighborhood of 100+ flowers budding). The Fresno chili doesn't have much fruity flavor, more of a green bell pepper sweetness. There was a good deal of heat that was nearly immediate, a good 7 on the intensity scale (for me anyhow). No delayed onset with these guys, they step into the ring swinging. I ate a whole Fresno and the effects lasted a good 20 minutes, peaking and holding intensity around 3-5 minutes in and holding to about 10-15 before beginning to subside. The store bought Hab's I've been eating take a good 30 seconds to a minute to start the sear and hold searing heat for a good 20 minutes with residual pain lasting till around the 30-45 minute mark.

I make these notes because I know there is a difference in a big way now when you eat a chili off the plant. I suspect the habanero power should probably double in intensity in comparison from store bought to fresh off the plant. This is me kind of putting the scoville numbers I read to the types of pain I experience when eating chili's. If a Fresno peaks at around 10k on the scoville scale I don't think the store bought Hab's I'm eating are even hitting the 100k mark. Don't get me wrong, the hab's phaquen hurt man, but I don't think they hurt ten times more...

Do you have any similar type comaparo's? What are your notes?
 
I love the fresno's! Habs are hotter and so are the pequins I have but...that means I can eat more of them without consequences. The habs...wreak havoc. Fresno's are great for sauce too for color and make better popper's than 'peno's I feel.

Salute', TB.
 

QuadShotz

Banned
Hmm, I get a vast rage of store bought chile heat here. Depends on the store, time of year, the suppier, etc.

From hardly warm, to OMGWTFBBQ like the infamous "EBil Habs".

Best peppers I've had from were at Albertson's and Winco.

Frak,, hard to type, hurty sweat in eyes from eating a 12" homemade fire burrito...two kinds of meat..(my dang spicy burrito meat from other day adn diced chicken nuggets w/ meunster), onion, red bell and green jalas, two cheeses, Nova's 666 sauce, cayenne, jalapeno & chipotle powder, and Kubik-Il XXXhot mixxed with bbq sauze.

Whewww...
 
@TB I'm getting to be a huge fan of the Fresno's as well. For much the same reason, it's nice to have a sports car but you need a day to day beater that you can have fun with too. Plus, that's the city I live in...:)

@QS I'm getting the same feeling regarding the Hab's at the store. Though, they do bring a lot of pain I'm not sure it's the legit 100k-300k pain I have read about. My plant is making me nervous. Dang dude, almost seems like you shouldn't even bother with the meats in that burrito :)
 

QuadShotz

Banned
Yeah, I just got these babies, adn they are very similar to the "Funky (burkina?) Habz" I had bought before that took my head off..

S6303812.jpg


bad lighting in here at night..sorry ya can't see the actual colors...some are nearly pink, others are neon orange and twisted.
 
Pink? Wow! Way better than what I get here. The ones I get are just a plain straight orange and last on the shelf for quite some time. I really appreciate when they take away the wrinkly ones and put in a fresh batch.
 
There are many varieties of orange hab but most of the ones I've got from grocery stores are quite tame. It could be the variety or the fact that they are likely picked green and ripen on the truck
 

QuadShotz

Banned
Diablo said:
Pink? Wow! Way better than what I get here. The ones I get are just a plain straight orange and last on the shelf for quite some time. I really appreciate when they take away the wrinkly ones and put in a fresh batch.

Yeah, here is a better depiction of the pinkish-yellowish-orange ones:

S6303818.jpg
 
I've had a couple of chile's give me a serious unexpected burn. My first ripe jalapeno this year was an absolute BEAST. I had a pepperoncini that burned my face off too. My fresno's by comparison have been perfect - good round heat, excellent flavour.

I'm actually in fear of half my plants. So I know where you are coming from! :)
 
Habanero's might not be "super" hots but they're pretty damn hot. Fresno's by comparison, if one were to use the scoville scale, are mild.

There is a variable here, FRESHNESS.

I pulled another immature Fresno from one of my plants today. It has HEAT. Granted, it doesn't sear the way a Hababero does. Also, the Hab's I have access to are store bought, I suspect they live on the shelf for a while, besides who knows how long it is from field to table.

So with the intensity the Fresno brought today I have to say that I am beginning to fear the Hab that I have growing right now (probably has in the neighborhood of 100+ flowers budding). The Fresno chili doesn't have much fruity flavor, more of a green bell pepper sweetness. There was a good deal of heat that was nearly immediate, a good 7 on the intensity scale (for me anyhow). No delayed onset with these guys, they step into the ring swinging. I ate a whole Fresno and the effects lasted a good 20 minutes, peaking and holding intensity around 3-5 minutes in and holding to about 10-15 before beginning to subside. The store bought Hab's I've been eating take a good 30 seconds to a minute to start the sear and hold searing heat for a good 20 minutes with residual pain lasting till around the 30-45 minute mark.

I make these notes because I know there is a difference in a big way now when you eat a chili off the plant. I suspect the habanero power should probably double in intensity in comparison from store bought to fresh off the plant. This is me kind of putting the scoville numbers I read to the types of pain I experience when eating chili's. If a Fresno peaks at around 10k on the scoville scale I don't think the store bought Hab's I'm eating are even hitting the 100k mark. Don't get me wrong, the hab's phaquen hurt man, but I don't think they hurt ten times more...

Do you have any similar type comaparo's? What are your notes?
Excellent- i agree- try a mouruaga x Maldivian heart or anything with Maldivian heart- so much oil and vanilla sweetness
 
I cannot comment on the Fresnos but I can comment on green, unripe habaneros. Mix them with bitter salad greens. Lights everything up and the green taste of the unripe habanero is delightful especially with arugula. Then again you'll get about 2/3 or so of the heat so unless you are used to heat it may be a bit much for the average person. Still, even my Mother which does not like heat at all liked it.
 
I've been noticing that imported Yucatan Habaneros in my local stores vary genetically.
I have found several that were SHM+ het (super hot membrane+ heterozygous) indicating that someone is working with them. The membranes are partials, just like with Rouge Noir for example, a half ghost hybrid. While such plants are not super-hot they are are generally rather pungent and moreover their phenotypic segregants as well as F1 hybrids (with SHM+ plants) can be super-hot!

Several papers have published reports of orange habaneros exceeding 600kSHU, due to pericarpal capsaiciniods, they top out around 800kSHU.

The habs also have good genes for resistance to some fungal pathogens of Capsicum. I've been working with some lines I obtained through Winco in 2019. I used to check through the peppers for unusual phenotypes. I don't shop at Winco anymore because management did some things I find unethical, however before that I did find some decent habanero genetics there.
 
I've been noticing that imported Yucatan Habaneros in my local stores vary genetically.
I have found several that were SHM+ het (super hot membrane+ heterozygous) indicating that someone is working with them. The membranes are partials, just like with Rouge Noir for example, a half ghost hybrid. While such plants are not super-hot they are are generally rather pungent and moreover their phenotypic segregants as well as F1 hybrids (with SHM+ plants) can be super-hot!

Several papers have published reports of orange habaneros exceeding 600kSHU, due to pericarpal capsaiciniods, they top out around 800kSHU.

The habs also have good genes for resistance to some fungal pathogens of Capsicum. I've been working with some lines I obtained through Winco in 2019. I used to check through the peppers for unusual phenotypes. I don't shop at Winco anymore because management did some things I find unethical, however before that I did find some decent habanero genetics there.
Scientist, I presume.
 
Scientist, I presume.
Most people would place the word MAD before it.

Any person engaging in the scientific method is a scientist, and the scientific method is nothing more than testing assumptions before declaring them as probable. Thus the word scientist holds as much weight as the concept of science as a community with a consensus. (it doesn't hold any)

Most so called scientists are specialists who know very little outside of their specialty.

Seriously. Ask a man in a lab coat what day of the week it is and they're likely to tell you that they don't know because they are a chemist and not a calendar. They tend to be ignorant.

I tend specialize in information and information analysis including but not limited to botany, taxonomy, chemistry, history and philosophy. (Goethe is a personal hero of mine people today are so uninspiring)

I'm an auto-didactic not a scientist.
 
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I’ve never had a Fresno so cannot comment on their heat level. I have been making scotch bonnet powder lately and find that the ones from Jamaica, which are harder to find locally, are significantly hotter than the common Dominican Republic ones fwiw. The DR ones seem pretty mild and I’ll need 2 + cut up pods in a pot of soup or sauce etc. to get where I want.
 
I don't usually like the heat of almost all the annums that I have tried. I prefer the heat of baccatums or chinense, despite being most hot, the heat is more predictable.

Annums often have an aggressive and spiny bite; as if someone were beating a hundred ice picks in your mouth. Despite being in a lower range on the Scoville scale, they seem very annoying to me.
On the other hand, a habanero, scotch bonnet or even a 7 pot, have a much higher heat, but in most cases it is more predictable. I tend to describe the hit and heat of a good SB or 7P as a pressure that gradually squeezes you until you're exhausted.

"I can handle a chocolate habanero in a salad, for example; but I find it very annoying to handle a fighting Serrano"

I imagine this will depend on the sensitivity of each person.

On the other hand, there is the market's habaneros. Here it isn't sold in supermarkets, in Spain so much spicy isn't consumed. But you can find them at farmers markets. Some are good strains, some are not.
But if I've bought frozen habaneros from multinational brands and honestly, it suck. Its flavor is minimal and its heat too.

I know two large-scale farmers who export their produce. I know that they don't care so much about the final quality of the fruit, they care more about the productivity and resistance of the crop. They must produce tons of a fruit to be able to export, selecting the best varieties in terms of taste and organoleptic quality is something secondary in which time cannot usually be wasted. For them it's more beneficial to buy seeds of more resistant and productive strains.
Éste no debería ser el caso. Es injusto para el consumidor. Pero los negocios suelen ser así.

I'm sure that when you taste the habaneros from your plant, the only thing you'll be able to say is: ":fireball:fuck... fuck... fuck...:fireball:"
 
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