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pests Got bugs

What are these and how do I kill em. They seemed to just appear today
 

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Look like aphids to me. With an infestation setting in that hard I'd break out the big guns and hit them with a pyrethrin spray. Then come back 4-5 days later with a horticultural oil then 4-5 days after that with spinosad. Then repeat at least once if not 2-3x's until there is no sign of them anymore. Otherwise you might be dealing with them all summer.
 
You can get rid off them with acetamiprid. I don't know USA products but in the EU you can find it very easily from many shops. It's white stick that contaits the insecticide and put underground. Very effectice to some small bugs. Bayer and Substral sell it in the EU countries. 
 
I think this it but could not find text does it contain acetamiprid.
https://www.amazon.com/Advanced-701710-Control-Fertilizer-10-Spikes/dp/B00192CNG2/ref=sr_1_9?dchild=1&keywords=bayer+pest+control+stick&qid=1593667020&s=lawn-garden&sr=1-9
 
Edit. It should work on too scale insects, greenhouse whiteflies, mealybugs, locust, thrips and my favor is fungus gnats. They can't eat anymore plant roots or leaves. Not sure if it work for spider mites but I would think they don't like the plant if its toxic. 
 
Karpasruuti said:
You can get rid off them with acetamiprid. I don't know USA products but in the EU you can find it very easily from many shops. It's white stick that contaits the insecticide and put underground. Very effectice to some small bugs. Bayer and Substral sell it in the EU countries. 
 
I think this it but could not find text does it contain acetamiprid.
https://www.amazon.com/Advanced-701710-Control-Fertilizer-10-Spikes/dp/B00192CNG2/ref=sr_1_9?dchild=1&keywords=bayer+pest+control+stick&qid=1593667020&s=lawn-garden&sr=1-9
 
Edit. It should work on too scale insects, greenhouse whiteflies, mealybugs, locust, thrips and my favor is fungus gnats. They can't eat anymore plant roots or leaves. Not sure if it work for spider mites but I would think they don't like the plant if its toxic.
The active ingredient in the sticks you linked is imidacloprid. It also explicitly says not use it for fruits or vegetables, so this may not be the best option.
 
Fallis said:
The active ingredient in the sticks you linked is imidacloprid. It also explicitly says not use it for fruits or vegetables, so this may not be the best option.
Why it's so hard to find something in ur market. I give up. But if you find it it's works and probably quite safe to mammals. It may kill bees if they polinate alot in ur chilies. 
 
I found three products than contains acetamiprid but only Amazon EU. Thousands of customer reviews and mostly positive.
 
I just made a Neem foliar spray, because the plants from the nursery came complete with Aphids. Now they are "going viral" in my garden.

In my opinion:
Maybe a "Blue Dawn Dish Soap" and water foliar spray out of the sunlight and leave to dry.

*IMPORTANT*
Be sure to rinse this soap mixture off before the sun hits it. So spray at night and rinse in the morning, if they're outside.

Then I would do a neem Soil-Drench for that infested Bad-Boy, also.

Neem is Systemic, so it might take a few days to notice anything with the soil drench. But the live bugs will suffocate from the soap spray and the neem with attack and interrupt their life cycle afterward.

Neem does need repeating bi-weekly or monthly, I think.
 
One more thing regarding soap/water and neem foliage spray:

I don't know if you can use the sprays together.
Some people say, "Yes, you can use them (or mix them) together and use simultaneously."
Other people will freak out when you mention mixing them.
"WHAT?! OMG, don't use them together...!"

I don't know which is correct, but I err in the side of caution.
So I wouldn't and don't use them together, myself.......the foliar spray, I mean. I wouldn't use the sprays together, but soap spray and neem soil drench together work alright.
 
alkhall said:
That is nice. I would not think you could that easily go shopping some bugs. I did not even tried to search I was bretty sure they could not sell it on Amazon. But bretty expensive too if you are organic grower then ur only option is bugs that kill another bugs :) I know only one store in Finland that sells all kind killer bugs and they sell it only via email.
 
I've never seen the bugs to be that effective against an infestation like you have. If it were me I'd remove as many as possible mechanically ( squishing with fingers and spraying with water) then hit em hard with organic spray like neem and then possibly add lady bugs or other predator insects.
 
Agree with Mr. Joe. There are lots of good products that are not harsh that can work for you. Two that are readily accessible that I would highly recommend are Lost Coast Plant Therapy and M-Pede. Both of these products are used within greenhouse growing by nursery professionals and will get the job done. Lost Coast can be found on Amazon and M-pede at any landscaping supply store. If there is a Site-One near you I know they stock it. Good Luck.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Bhuter said:
One more thing regarding soap/water and neem foliage spray:

I don't know if you can use the sprays together.
Some people say, "Yes, you can use them (or mix them) together and use simultaneously."
Other people will freak out when you mention mixing them.
"WHAT?! OMG, don't use them together...!"

I don't know which is correct, but I err in the side of caution.
So I wouldn't and don't use them together, myself.......the foliar spray, I mean. I wouldn't use the sprays together, but soap spray and neem soil drench together work alright.
I've used them separately and together and prefer to use them together. IIRC the instructions on the bottle of my neem oil recommend adding soap. Not only is it more convenient to use together, it makes chemical sense to do so. The essential oils in neem are not water soluble, so they will form globules in the water spray. Oils won't evenly dissolve throughout the water. Adding a surfactant (I've used dish soap as well as Dr. Bronners which I prefer becasue it dissolves more quickly) will aid in solubilization of the oils. So your spray will be more homogeneous and stable.
 
Karpasruuti said:
You can get rid off them with acetamiprid. I don't know USA products but in the EU you can find it very easily from many shops. It's white stick that contaits the insecticide and put underground. Very effectice to some small bugs. Bayer and Substral sell it in the EU countries. 
 
I think this it but could not find text does it contain acetamiprid.
https://www.amazon.com/Advanced-701710-Control-Fertilizer-10-Spikes/dp/B00192CNG2/ref=sr_1_9?dchild=1&keywords=bayer+pest+control+stick&qid=1593667020&s=lawn-garden&sr=1-9
 
Edit. It should work on too scale insects, greenhouse whiteflies, mealybugs, locust, thrips and my favor is fungus gnats. They can't eat anymore plant roots or leaves. Not sure if it work for spider mites but I would think they don't like the plant if its toxic. 
 
PLEASE don't use that sort of systemic neonicotinoid!  Sure, the stuff works wonders, permeating the tissue and killing anything that chomps on your plant.  Unfortunately it also kills pollinators, leaf-cutting bees, and damn near everything else that comes in contact with the plant, flower, or pollen.  The pesticide is very stable and will persist inside the plant for many weeks, even months. Bees are particularly sensitive to this class of pesticide. Just a few billionths of a gram will permanently fry their little bee brains.
 
If you must spray the aphids, use a Pyrethrin based spray or 'bug bomb' fogger.  Pyrethrins are just as deadly as other insecticides, but break down after a few days, so you don't wind up nuking the local food chain.  I like the foggers a lot. If you snip the locking tab off the trigger mechanism, you can make it emit brief blasts of fine mist.  Hold beneath the plant and blow upward, onto the underside of the leaves.  
 
My 'tree hugger' approach to aphids is to try and hold out long enough for the parasitic wasps to show up. These tiny black monsters inject an egg into the aphid, with 'Alien' like results. A single wasp can inject hundreds of aphids. Look for brown cocoons of doomed aphids among the living.  In my area I usually have one or two weeks of "Oh, shit, the bastards are going to eat everything!"  Then the wasps show and it's one week of "Hurry up!"  After that, the aphids are quickly knocked back to the point of near irrelevance.  I still find a few here and there, but the wasps are always on hand as well, doing their evil work!  Of course, you may not have a population of wasps in the area... 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YuG39V82J7I 
 
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