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Growing Problems in Southern California

We had the coolest and most sunless spring and summer in Southern California history this year. I planted in early April and over the past 85 days there have probably been 10 days with any appreciable amount of sun. 
 
This might be a dumb question, but is this the reason why very few of my plants have even immature fruits growing yet?  The only ones producing peppers are the Bulgarian Carrot and the Jalapeno.   The rest all look healthy but the fruits look like they are in a state of arrested development.
 
Would also like to hear from others in SoCal in the similar situation!
 
Thx
 
I'm not in SoCal, but your plants that don't love the high temps and humidity so much - i.e., Annuums and Baccatums, should be the ones that benefit the most from this.  In fact, if you get a sudden reversal in the weather, they're, unfortunately, also likely to suffer for this. (almost immediately)
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I have a mass downturn every year in my As and Bs, and a massive uptick in my Chinense, when our weather turns in June.  Caveat: The Chinense grow better in the cooler weather, but produce like mad once it turns.  Annuum and Baccatum stop doing everything, and either maintain, or beg to be culled. (I could probably help by using shadecloth, but that's beside the point)
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Anyway, use my experiences to help you come to a conclusion for your area.
 

Edmick

Staff Member
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I'm in southern california and have e experienced mostly the same. They didn't really seem to be bothered by the overcast days of spring but the cooler nights definitely slowed them down a bit. I started my plants from seed at the end of january though and my usual plant out times were delayed by at least a month. Luckily I have a dedicated grow room that could accommodate them cuz they were damn near full grown before I ever hardened them off. Anyways, having said that, now that the days are sunny where I live the plants are exploding with growth and pods and have harvested a couple pounds already. We have a long season so just let them do their thing and they'll take off soon enough
 
solid7 said:
I'm not in SoCal, but your plants that don't love the high temps and humidity so much - i.e., Annuums and Baccatums, should be the ones that benefit the most from this.  In fact, if you get a sudden reversal in the weather, they're, unfortunately, also likely to suffer for this. (almost immediately)
.
I have a mass downturn every year in my As and Bs, and a massive uptick in my Chinense, when our weather turns in June.  Caveat: The Chinense grow better in the cooler weather, but produce like mad once it turns.  Annuum and Baccatum stop doing everything, and either maintain, or beg to be culled. (I could probably help by using shadecloth, but that's beside the point)
.
Anyway, use my experiences to help you come to a conclusion for your area.
Ya, seen exactly the same here in S FL,  but really didn't understand it, till you just explained...
Seems plants just take off in Jan Feb March April grow like nuts. Plus seems like the pests in the winter are a lot less of a problem...
 
This is the first time growing baccatums. My Aji Lemon Drop can't take the june/july sFL sun very well. After 4 hours of morning sun it stats to wilt, leafs get all soft and thin fragile feeling, but it recovers perfect in a couple hours. And its not from lack of water. Its about 22" tall now. Thought it was because it was a young plant just getting use to its month old new pot, or because I planted it half way up on the long bare stem, now I know better, thanks Solid7.
 
  The other similar age/size baccatums do a little better and can take a full day of sun without me pulling them to the shade like the Lemon drop, but have a small amount of wilt by 3pm. They recover fast, but the growth has slowed way down compared to all the other non bacctums.
 
They seem to still be growing, but slower then I'd like. When will the bacctums take off again..? Anything to do to help them out...? Epson salt..? lol

 
 
I'm in frost-free coastal SoCal. Every year the weather seems different, and the plants respond accordingly. As long as they look healthy vegetatively,  I don't pay them much mind.  They are going to do what they are going to do.  Maybe this makes me a bad Pepper Mom, but sooner or later they will fruit well especially since my season, most years , lasts close to Christmas.
 
Edmick said:
I'm in southern california and have e experienced mostly the same. They didn't really seem to be bothered by the overcast days of spring but the cooler nights definitely slowed them down a bit. I started my plants from seed at the end of january though and my usual plant out times were delayed by at least a month. Luckily I have a dedicated grow room that could accommodate them cuz they were damn near full grown before I ever hardened them off. Anyways, having said that, now that the days are sunny where I live the plants are exploding with growth and pods and have harvested a couple pounds already. We have a long season so just let them do their thing and they'll take off soon enough
 

Thanks, this was helpful.  I hope you don't mind sharing a few more tips, I'll reach out to you via PM.
 
I'm in southern California, there is no shortage of sun now. Early spring night temps were in the 40's with warm daytime temps. My plants suffered greatly from the cold nights and from me not properly hardening them off.
I am an inexperienced gardener so no question I've made mistakes. I started the garden in a new location without proper soil preparation ( next year I'll try harder) My plants are all fairly small. Jalapeno, bells,bella, island serrano are all stacking on pods while my hotter varieties are just starting to flower.
 
here in the northeast the entire spring was much cooler with a lot of rain and overcast days. my plants seemed stunted with very little growth. nights were in the 40`s and 50`s. finally in the last week of may the temps went up to 60`s at night and plant growth really took off. like Rue Bella said above "They are going to do what they are going to do." your plants will be fine.  :cheers: 
 
Mr.joe said:
I'm in southern California, there is no shortage of sun now. Early spring night temps were in the 40's with warm daytime temps. My plants suffered greatly from the cold nights and from me not properly hardening them off.
I am an inexperienced gardener so no question I've made mistakes. I started the garden in a new location without proper soil preparation ( next year I'll try harder) My plants are all fairly small. Jalapeno, bells,bella, island serrano are all stacking on pods while my hotter varieties are just starting to flower.
 

Nice to hear that.  As I said when I posted, I'm in SoCal but in coastal San Diego, and this has been a mostly sunless spring and early summer.  Those of you inland a bit, or in suburban LA, are no doubt drenched with sun by now.
 
What hotter peppers did you plant?  Did you start from seed or buy plants?
 
luvmesump3pp3rz said:
here in the northeast the entire spring was much cooler with a lot of rain and overcast days. my plants seemed stunted with very little growth. nights were in the 40`s and 50`s. finally in the last week of may the temps went up to 60`s at night and plant growth really took off. like Rue Bella said above "They are going to do what they are going to do." your plants will be fine.  :cheers: 
 

The words of a wise man!  It's just that I'm still a newb and I tend to fuss more than you veterans.  Especially I keep learning important factoids (such as avoid all Kellogg products).  I'm also now dreading the influx of the hornworm since the temps are hotting up.
 
Rue Bella said:
I'm in frost-free coastal SoCal. Every year the weather seems different, and the plants respond accordingly. As long as they look healthy vegetatively,  I don't pay them much mind.  They are going to do what they are going to do.  Maybe this makes me a bad Pepper Mom, but sooner or later they will fruit well especially since my season, most years , lasts close to Christmas.
 
This is my third year, and I'm in coastal North County San Diego. My first year was easy, I only grew a few plants purchased at the local Home Depot. 
 
Last year was a disaster for reasons too complicated to get into.  Suffice it to say that based on bad advice from the grower, combined with a rookie mistake, I didn't get any fruit until late September from the megahots!  I had to figure out the problem myself, which was frustrating.
 
So I'm hoping this year will be the first truly productive year with some experience and learning under my belt.  Someday I hope to be as laissez-faire about it as you!
 

 
 
Derelict said:
Someday I hope to be as laissez-faire about it as you!
 
You will be, as long as you pay attention to detail, and learn from rookie mistakes.
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My personal belief is that there are no mistakes in life, only lessons.  If you made a mistake, then it's because you didn't learn the lesson.  And you'll never move on from mistakes, until you do learn the lesson.
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Growing peppers is easy, and I believe that one day, you'll agree with that.
 
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