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Horseradish

I just made prepared horseradish from my own plants for the first time, WOW! I thought the fumes coming off a moruga or ghost sauce were potent, when i opened the processor it was like getting punched in the face.  It literally brought me to my knees.  Has anyone tried incorporating horseradish into a sauce?  I was thinking of adding a moruga to my next batch of horseradish :flamethrower:
 
Well I made a fermented sauce along with other known hot ingredients, and it still had its pungency. I call it complete heat, and it was a true ass kicker. Now in fairness I did use all of it in less than six months, but it was strong all the way until the end. Gave you the nasal heat, but oh how nice it was! Speaking of, I need to make another batch of that. It is one of my favorites.
 
The Hot Pepper said:
I don't know the life but it's sold in the refrigerated section by the pickles and has a date, and it's pretty accurate. I've tried to use older stuff in bloody marys and it's just wet cardboard.
I am out of the stuff I buy in the stores, so I cannot remember the name but its fairly potent, even after a few months in the fridge. I have seen it lose some of its heat compared to raw though, but not as bad as the one you described. What brand is it? Some may be more potent than others,or just really old. If I could get all the ingredients together for my sauce I might enter some of it in your contest. 
 
I've tried using horseradish in a sauce and while the horseradish flavor was still in there, that nose hit you take with a bite of the good fresh stuff wasn't. That burn comes from enzymatic activity. Here's how it's explained on the Silver Spring Foods website:
 
[SIZE=13.3333px]"Horseradish has a relatively high concentration of glucosinalates stored in its roots. When the root cells are crushed by cutting, chewing or grating, enzymes are released that convert these glucosinalates into highly volatile oils called isothiocyanates. It is the isothiocyanate that gives horseradish its characteristic bite.[/SIZE]
Finer grinds of horseradish are usually hotter than courser grinds because more volatile oils have been released.
If freshly grated horseradish is exposed to air for long periods of time, kept out of refrigeration or stored improperly, it will lose its heat quickly."
[SIZE=13.3333px]From my experience trying to work it into a sauce, heat will destroy most all of the character of the horseradish. You'll still retain some of the flavor of the root however it will be much reduced from what you get with the raw ground root. My concern for keeping everything safe and processing the sauce properly kept me from adding a cold blend of the root to the cold sauce. Some professionals who have more experience and the proper equipment could probably pull it off.[/SIZE]
 
[SIZE=13.3333px]JMHO :)[/SIZE]
[SIZE=13.3333px]RM[/SIZE]
 

The Hot Pepper

Founder
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AaronTT said:
I am out of the stuff I buy in the stores, so I cannot remember the name
 
It is usually Gold's. That stuff is pretty good. But fades fast, probably because of the airspace created in the jar as you use it... 
 
RocketMan said:
I've tried using horseradish in a sauce and while the horseradish flavor was still in there, that nose hit you take with a bite of the good fresh stuff wasn't. That burn comes from enzymatic activity. Here's how it's explained on the Silver Spring Foods website:
 
[SIZE=13.3333px]"Horseradish has a relatively high concentration of glucosinalates stored in its roots. When the root cells are crushed by cutting, chewing or grating, enzymes are released that convert these glucosinalates into highly volatile oils called isothiocyanates. It is the isothiocyanate that gives horseradish its characteristic bite.[/SIZE]
Finer grinds of horseradish are usually hotter than courser grinds because more volatile oils have been released.
If freshly grated horseradish is exposed to air for long periods of time, kept out of refrigeration or stored improperly, it will lose its heat quickly."
[SIZE=13.3333px]From my experience trying to work it into a sauce, heat will destroy most all of the character of the horseradish. You'll still retain some of the flavor of the root however it will be much reduced from what you get with the raw ground root. My concern for keeping everything safe and processing the sauce properly kept me from adding a cold blend of the root to the cold sauce. Some professionals who have more experience and the proper equipment could probably pull it off.[/SIZE]
 
[SIZE=13.3333px]JMHO :)[/SIZE]
[SIZE=13.3333px]RM[/SIZE]
 
Yeah in a sauce it's not going to work. That's why most bloody mary mixes don't have it. If they did, it would just be floating bits of nothing. If they do, it's just a selling point.
 
AaronTT said:
Well I made a fermented sauce along with other known hot ingredients, and it still had its pungency. I call it complete heat, and it was a true ass kicker. Now in fairness I did use all of it in less than six months, but it was strong all the way until the end. Gave you the nasal heat, but oh how nice it was! Speaking of, I need to make another batch of that. It is one of my favorites.
recipe/pics?
Are you fermenting the horseradish too?
 
RocketMan said:
I've tried using horseradish in a sauce and while the horseradish flavor was still in there, that nose hit you take with a bite of the good fresh stuff wasn't. That burn comes from enzymatic activity. Here's how it's explained on the Silver Spring Foods website:
 
[SIZE=13.3333px]"Horseradish has a relatively high concentration of glucosinalates stored in its roots. When the root cells are crushed by cutting, chewing or grating, enzymes are released that convert these glucosinalates into highly volatile oils called isothiocyanates. It is the isothiocyanate that gives horseradish its characteristic bite.[/SIZE]
Finer grinds of horseradish are usually hotter than courser grinds because more volatile oils have been released.
If freshly grated horseradish is exposed to air for long periods of time, kept out of refrigeration or stored improperly, it will lose its heat quickly."
[SIZE=13.3333px]From my experience trying to work it into a sauce, heat will destroy most all of the character of the horseradish. You'll still retain some of the flavor of the root however it will be much reduced from what you get with the raw ground root. My concern for keeping everything safe and processing the sauce properly kept me from adding a cold blend of the root to the cold sauce. Some professionals who have more experience and the proper equipment could probably pull it off.[/SIZE]
 
[SIZE=13.3333px]JMHO :)[/SIZE]
[SIZE=13.3333px]RM[/SIZE]
 
Hawaiianero said:
recipe/pics?
Are you fermenting the horseradish too?
I ferment almost all of my sauces. On top of that, I'm probably one of the few here who does not cook any portion of it at any time. Its just not needed, and I want the beneficial bacteria to remain in it. Perhaps because it never gets cooked it explains why it still has some of that nasal heat. When I make this version I use raw horseradish. My process is to put all ingredients in a food processor, then ferment. Once fermented, its right back into the food processor, which breaks it down as good(or pretty damn close) as cooking. If it does not break down, its a que for me to continue fermenting it. A properly fermented sauce will almost turn into liquid when done this way. I do use a somewhat coarse strainer to remove some of the solids, but not every time. I will have to look for the recipe as I cannot remember all the ingredients off the top of my head, but I remember some of them. Superhot peppers and other very hot varieties, horseradish, mustard greens, a type of seed I cannot remember that has heat, a hot spicy heirloom garlic, and a few more that I cannot remember at the moment. I think I am missing another hot ingredient. This sauce gives heat in a few ways, and perhaps the mustard greens lend some of the nasal heat as well. Everyone who has tried it, thought it was unique and had a hard time handling it. The combination of heat in the mouth and throat, and in the nasal passages at the same time is something else to deal with, lol.
A lot of people worry about bacteria, but fermentation without cooking has been done for thousands of years without too many problems. Anything I ferment, I do not cook. I am picky about cleanliness, and salt ratios which are very important. The salt retards growth of harmful bacteria, but allows the good ones to flourish. This is what people did before refrigeration. 

The Hot Pepper said:
 
It is usually Gold's. That stuff is pretty good. But fades fast, probably because of the airspace created in the jar as you use it... 
 
 
Yeah in a sauce it's not going to work. That's why most bloody mary mixes don't have it. If they did, it would just be floating bits of nothing. If they do, it's just a selling point.
Your going to compel me to make it again just so I can prove I'm not lying, lol. I'll send you some. Once you try it, I will be surprised if you are not impressed.
 
I said screw it and threw some in a Chocolate Habanero, Ghost, Moruga blend (this is raw horseradish out of my garden).  I figure horseradish may weaken overtime but so does capsaicin and I dont cook my sauces.  I only put in a Tbs so it may not even come through, Ill let you know what happens. :drooling:
 
dragonsfire said:
I tried growing some but the roots were so dwindlee , still very hot but not anything to harvest, got seeds so when Im ready Il try again.
do you mean horseradish seeds?  I have read they dont grow easily from seed. 
 
Yes, got a handful, maybe start some up when my seed order comes in and start all at once. Hmmm, been looking at videos, their all taking about roots so need to do more research. This person said "Horseradish do set some seeds, but they are mostly sterile and do not sprout. Root propagation is the best way to go". Well Il plant some and see how iot goes, next time im in a store and see fresh roots then Il grab some :)
 
I just came into a plant for the first time via some root cuttings from a friend.  I am kinda chuffed about it.  The plant is doing really well.  My friend said it was Bohemian, and the plant was maybe 20 years old and the roots didn't get any more big around than a pencil.  Someone in Germany sent cutings to him 20 years ago.  I tasted it and it was really good.  The Bohemian I see on the Internet is larger than a pencil around, however.  But this is old, maybe heirloom.  I dunno.  I could share a piece of the root from my new plant.  All you need is an inch or two.  You can't kill these plants digging up the roots.  These are way different from store bought which are larger than a pencil.

I've mail ordered Atomic for years from Deb. It has recently shown up on store shelves here.

http://truenaturaltaste.com/atomic-horseradish/
 
Hope not to hij-jack thread =>> The Habby Horse sounds delish.
 
Jim
 
zOnsSrzl.jpg
 
dragonsfire said:
Yes, got a handful, maybe start some up when my seed order comes in and start all at once. Hmmm, been looking at videos, their all taking about roots so need to do more research. This person said "Horseradish do set some seeds, but they are mostly sterile and do not sprout. Root propagation is the best way to go". Well Il plant some and see how iot goes, next time im in a store and see fresh roots then Il grab some :)
spend a little money and get yourself some good root stock, its cheap enough for gods sake.  This is where I got mine and it did beautifully.
 
http://noursefarms.com/horseradish-roots/big-top/
 
My only experience with homegrown horseradish was as a kid, maybe 10-12. My parents got a root cutting from a friend and started several plants from it. Mom had horses so they got put right into the "pile" by the side of the barn. When harvested, the roots were the size of my arm in length and thickness! I remember both sets of my grandparents and the neighbor couple coming by to help grate it...all by hand. All of the windows and doors were open and they had to take shifts. Kids were not allowed in the house. I had to disobey, of course. Damn that was a mistake! We had jars cellared for over a year that were still quite pungent and had fantastic heat and flavor. While not as strong as fresh, it was plenty powerful. I have to assume that the growing medium was the key. Since I just entered the world of gardening this year, I figured that is one of the things I would try next year to add to my hot peppers as well. This thread has provided much insight. Thanks all for posting.
 
so I made my Chocolate habanero, Ghost, Moruga horseradish sauce and to be honest..
It was so F&*king hot all i tasted was the death of my tongue.  It had an uncharacteristic deep throat burn much like swallowing a pinecone that Im attributing to the horseradish.  I didnt like it.  Im going to try again with seeded pods and see if that helps because the aroma was awesome!
 
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