heat MADAGASCAR PERI PERI Hottest African beauties

Friends,

It looks like I am standing under a windfall.
The seeds seem to be coming to me from all corner of world.

A good friend Wazza sent me a few pods of Madagascar Peri peri which came in today's post.

4228268171_6223efcb05_o.jpg


If you are not much familiar with these African variety (from Madagascar), let me tell you that they are mini bombs. They go best with a bottle of Taquila or Rum on rocks.

These I am sure to grow this year with Kanthari.( I am worried ...if I go to India in March, I will be back inApril end.) This would be late for planting. Let me see what to do.
I am Happy I am Happy.

NJA
 
I have several types of African Birdseye (Peri Peri), including one hotter than any hab I've ever tried... some are hot... some are hotter... but they're all wonderful.
 
I've tried a few Omri, but nothing extremely hot. I'd like to find the nuclear one. SO many peppers go by this name. FInding the real deal isn't easy.
 
cmpman1974 said:
I've tried a few Omri, but nothing extremely hot. I'd like to find the nuclear one. SO many peppers go by this name. FInding the real deal isn't easy.
It ain't Jolokia hot, or even Fatalii hot for that matter... but hotter than Habaneros. PM me ya address and will do my best posting them seeds soon enough. might even send ya some dried pods of several different types for da tastin'.
 
cmpman1974 said:
I've tried a few Omri, but nothing extremely hot. I'd like to find the nuclear one. SO many peppers go by this name. FInding the real deal isn't easy.

I know a friend who was born and raised in Madagascar and he is the one who introduced me to this variety.
According to him, Madagascar peri peri is hottest of all the African bird'eye.

It was in 1989 when while drinking in London, he opened a bottle of pickled peri peri and asked me to have a go at them.
I thought that they were tiny itsy bitsy thingies so I popped in three at a time.

And only I know how I felt at that time.:mouthonfire:
Next day in India was also same. (then , I was not aware of Nagas. For that matter most of India was unaware except Assamese people).

Today, I just chewed on a little placents when I received the envelope. First five seconds , there was nothing. Then the heat picked up and stayed with me for about 2 hours.

It has promise of a good variety.

NJA
 
is it C.annuum or C.frutescens....? if its C.frutescens i would like to get some seeds if you have any, buit if its C.annuum dont worry
 
PepperLover said:
is it C.annuum or C.frutescens....? if its C.frutescens i would like to get some seeds if you have any, buit if its C.annuum dont worry

Capsicum frutescens 'African Devil' (African birdseye or African red devil) is a cultivar of Capsicum frutescens, one of the sources of chili pepper, that grows both wild and domesticated. It is a small and extremely spicy member of the capsicum (Capsicum) genus.

The plants are usually very bushy and grow in height to 45-120 centimeters, with leaves of 4-7 cm length and 1.3-1.5 cm width. The fruits are generally tapered to a blunt point and measure up to 2.5 centimeters long. Immature pod color is green, mature color is bright red or purple. Some varieties of birdseye measure up to 175,000 Scoville Heat Units.
 
Naga Jolokia Addict said:
Capsicum frutescens 'African Devil' (African birdseye or African red devil) is a cultivar of Capsicum frutescens, one of the sources of chili pepper, that grows both wild and domesticated. It is a small and extremely spicy member of the capsicum (Capsicum) genus.

The plants are usually very bushy and grow in height to 45-120 centimeters, with leaves of 4-7 cm length and 1.3-1.5 cm width. The fruits are generally tapered to a blunt point and measure up to 2.5 centimeters long. Immature pod color is green, mature color is bright red or purple. Some varieties of birdseye measure up to 175,000 Scoville Heat Units.

cool thnx for info hope u get some seeds out if u can
 
Naga Jolokia Addict said:
I know a friend who was born and raised in Madagascar and he is the one who introduced me to this variety.
According to him, Madagascar peri peri is hottest of all the African bird'eye.

It was in 1989 when while drinking in London, he opened a bottle of pickled peri peri and asked me to have a go at them.
I thought that they were tiny itsy bitsy thingies so I popped in three at a time.

And only I know how I felt at that time.:mouthonfire:
Next day in India was also same. (then , I was not aware of Nagas. For that matter most of India was unaware except Assamese people).

Today, I just chewed on a little placents when I received the envelope. First five seconds , there was nothing. Then the heat picked up and stayed with me for about 2 hours.

It has promise of a good variety.

NJA

When exactly do you think the rest of the world first became aware of Nagas. I first heard of them about three years ago on a site like this.
 
cmpman1974 said:
TheChileman (Mark) grew them back in 2003. I remember discussing a mystery variety with him and trying to get some seeds. :)

I became aware in 2003 .But laid my hands on them in 2006 in US.

How sad.

NJA
 
I certainly see the connection but how did they become an African variety if their origin is Brazil or Portugal, and they really don't look like the malaguetas that I know and grow
 
POTAWIE said:
I certainly see the connection but how did they become an African variety if their origin is Brazil or Portugal, and they really don't look like the malaguetas that I know and grow

Portugese introduced peppers to India, Indonesia and African countries.

An alternate sequence for chili peppers' spread has the Portuguese getting the pepper from Spain, and thence to India, as described by Lizzie Collingham in her book Curry.[7] Collingham states in her book that the chili pepper figures heavily in the cuisine of the Goan region of India, which was the site of a Portuguese colony (e.g. vindaloo, an Indian interpretation of a Portuguese dish). Collingham also describes the journey of chili peppers from India, through Central Asia and Turkey, to Hungary, where it became the national spice in the form of paprika.

from wiki

I dunno how different they look. But it is said to be same if not almost same.

NJA
 
Back
Top