Off ground elevated bed?

The Hot Pepper

Founder
Admin
It could be the same and marketing, but NSF certification means it can technically be used to seal a drinking water pipe so I'd go with that.
 

Siv

Extreme Member
After pricing up materials for building more of my raised beds, it seems only a few bucks more to buy stock tanks instead. My first ones were cheap since the wood was free but looking at cedar prices, it adds a fair amount to the cost.
 
No doubt the bricks are by far the cheapest but to get to 2ft high, I'd need some cement and skill!
 
Siv said:
No doubt the bricks are by far the cheapest but to get to 2ft high, I'd need some cement and skill!
 
I did not attach mine.  Just stacked them in place.  It's not worth using mortar, as there is no solid footer under them.  I just kick them into place.  As time goes on, they will slowly absorb into the ground - at which time, I may or may not add more layers.  The big difference, is that I actually want my media to be touching the ground.  I think most people like to have a container bottom, for isolation.  Pros/Cons of both. 
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But as I said, there is a fair amount of work involved...  Especially if, like me, you can't drive your truck up to the bed site to unload...  I had to slog them about 200 ft to destination, carrying 2-3 at a time.
 

Crazy Monkey

Business Member
The Hot Pepper said:
By the way, for non-food planters I use Flex Seal. That stuff really does work!!!!! ;)
 
Makes a great chicken wire boat too...
 
ahoy.jpg
 

Siv

Extreme Member
solid7 said:
 
I did not attach mine.  Just stacked them in place.  It's not worth using mortar, as there is no solid footer under them.  I just kick them into place.  As time goes on, they will slowly absorb into the ground - at which time, I may or may not add more layers.  The big difference, is that I actually want my media to be touching the ground.  I think most people like to have a container bottom, for isolation.  Pros/Cons of both. 
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But as I said, there is a fair amount of work involved...  Especially if, like me, you can't drive your truck up to the bed site to unload...  I had to slog them about 200 ft to destination, carrying 2-3 at a time.
 
I leave the bottom of my raised beds open to the ground also. I filled the bottom foot with tree branches, leaves and other organic waste and only the top foot with soil. I have to top them up every year as I guess the organics are decomposing but the plants and worms seem very happy!
 
Siv said:
 
I leave the bottom of my raised beds open to the ground also. I filled the bottom foot with tree branches, leaves and other organic waste and only the top foot with soil. I have to top them up every year as I guess the organics are decomposing but the plants and worms seem very happy!
 
Heck yeah!  That's just about the #1 way to bed full of well conditioned soil, and happy plants!
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In my pic, you can see that my nursery cloth was formerly covered with pine park.  That has decomposed into a substrate so rich, that weeds are busting out everywhere.  So, as I build planters, I'm scraping the old bark and all the pulled weeds, and lining the planter with that stuff, before filling them up with the good fresh stuff.  I've also tossed in the rotten wood from the old planters.  I mean, they're full of bugs and mushrooms, so it's pretty clear that they're being recycled, anyway.
 
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Lots of great ideas here. I actually built a fence for my garden because of my dog. For two years I've been talking Scott building a larger fenced area, but it hasn't happened yet.
One other thing to consider with your planter design is to make sure it doesn't tip easily. Some plants get very large and provide a good sail tip collect wind.
As someone mentioned earlier an electric fence charger is a good option
 
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