misc Orius insidious suppliers or capture tips

CraftyFox

Extreme Member
I'm trying to find a supplier of Orius insidious, somewhere in the 50-250 count range.. Or a good way of trapping them, as I'm not doing too well hunting them.
Not Nature's Good Guys brand, as I'm not going thru them again due to issues with a previous order..
I just want to stock my greenroom and see if I can maintain/increase the population. I only have one currently and that was by it's own volition.. If only they were parthenogenic.

Thanks.
 
Solution
Looks like the best place to get them was in the yard, after there was a quarter each bounty on them.

Not quite to 50 yet, but we've got close to 20 now, and I was able to spend most of time just watching how they were settling in.
Over half of them were found, where we find many other predators.. In the perennial Sonchus.

CraftyFox

Extreme Member
Been there.. Usually when I ask something like this, I'm looking for answers in relation to experience. Like, somewhere other's have already ordered from and have good experience with, as to avoid more negative experiences.
I've also looked thru Ebay and Ama..
Also managed to catch my first one too! On a Bull thistle. This one looks a bit bigger.. Still so tiny! 2/50.. Only 48 more to go..
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Downriver

Extreme Member
Pirate bug. Not sure I'd want them in the house. Bite can be very painful. There are other beneficials that are much more "user friendly". Think green lacewing. jmo
 

CraftyFox

Extreme Member
Pirate bug. Not sure I'd want them in the house. Bite can be very painful. There are other beneficials that are much more "user friendly". Think green lacewing. jmo
I hear you there! True bugs have a nasty bite! I've yet to be tagged by one of these.. And these guys will all be in an isolated room. I handle insects and other arthropods daily and it's a very rare instance that I get tagged, bite or sting. I love lacewings, but they are not a good combo with Ladybirds.
I want to try running something in chorus with them this year, outside of the wasps and soldiers, which are a power of themselves. We also have Masked Hunters that live in our foundation and can be found lurking at times in various sizes.

Our yard actually teams with Golden-eyes during the year, and even more with Hoverflies, but neither of them will last with a few ladybugs. Orius, on the other hand, is another sneaky, hidey-face stinkbug.. I have a real time finding any of the four I'm up to. Lacewings are fairly quick, but they are too big to evade the Beetles, who eagerly eat even their own young when in close quarters.

And while the ladybirds did a banger of a job last year, they didn't touch the spidermites and are pretty useless against thrips, and getting the tiny aphids in the crevices, as an adult.. I'm blessed with the unholy trio this year. I'm not even sure where the spider mites came from, but they have been slowly moving around the greenroom this summer, and I haven't been paying well enough mind to my plants. I'm also curious how Orius will interact with the wasps and the fungal gnat adults, another thing the Beetles don't bother with much.

I've been wanting to do these indoors for a while now, but they are tricky to gather.. So far I haven't found two in the same place. My biggest one, surely a female, came from the compost bucket. I have a feeling that if I can get them established, and provide them with a good enough diversity of floral life, they might roost all year round. I've read they enjoy peppers, and I'm also running toms and a ton of Coleus(which flowers all winter).
I have a couple worm buckets and isopod bins up there too, so there should be plenty of places for them to feel safe.
 

CraftyFox

Extreme Member
Looks like the best place to get them was in the yard, after there was a quarter each bounty on them.

Not quite to 50 yet, but we've got close to 20 now, and I was able to spend most of time just watching how they were settling in.
Over half of them were found, where we find many other predators.. In the perennial Sonchus.
 
Solution
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