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chinense Peruvian white habanero... regional origin within Peru?

Hi there, so I've doing research into the regions where certain Andean chinense varieties that originate from within Peru and Bolivia. I've noticed a pattern where aji limo/limon type peppers, including Aji Cajamarca and Scarlet Lantern, and others, appear to originate from these areas. These varieties also seem to be well suited to northern, mountainous and/or oceanic climates. Beni Highlands may be in following with that pattern. Another variety that is well suited to the West coast of Canada is the Peruvian White habanero, and yet, I can't find any information on what region of Peru it comes from. If anyone knows, please fill me in. I've done some research into this, and all I can find is that it's from Peru. I suspect that this variety, as well as the Yellow Jellybean hail from mid-elevation areas west of the Andes, much like the Limon/Limo varieties. Although, I could be wrong. It be nice if there was an internet based resource that showed maps of the specific areas of origin for all these varieties, with ranges superimposed over google-maps, or something. Does such a website already exist?
 

Downriver

Extreme Member
Another one to look into is the Paper Lantern Habanero. I received some seeds from a friend several years ago that he obtained from peppers he bought in Abancay, Peru. I call them 'Abancay Red', because we didn't know what they were. In subsequent years, another friend from Atlanta sent me some seeds for Paper Lantern Habanero. I grew both and you can't tell them apart. Of course, I still call the one from Abancay 'Abancay Red' lol. Very prolific and early. I grow both every year without fail - one of my favorites.
 
DownRiver said:
Another one to look into is the Paper Lantern Habanero. I received some seeds from a friend several years ago that he obtained from peppers he bought in Abancay, Peru. I call them 'Abancay Red', because we didn't know what they were. In subsequent years, another friend from Atlanta sent me some seeds for Paper Lantern Habanero. I grew both and you can't tell them apart. Of course, I still call the one from Abancay 'Abancay Red' lol. Very prolific and early. I grow both every year without fail - one of my favorites.
DR, I was thinking the other day that some Limo type habs and paper lanterns look suspiciously similar. How do they compare taste-wise? Supposedly, the Aji Limo Rojo (a confusing name, considering it's supposedly a chinense) have a sour yet not quite citrus taste.

And I take it Abancay has a relatively cool climate, right?

Damn, I wish I could just get on a plane and head to Peru, right now, and go seed hunting.
 
LordTriffid78 said:
DR, I was thinking the other day that some Limo type habs and paper lanterns look suspiciously similar. How do they compare taste-wise? Supposedly, the Aji Limo Rojo (a confusing name, considering it's supposedly a chinense) have a sour yet not quite citrus taste.

And I take it Abancay has a relatively cool climate, right?

Damn, I wish I could just get on a plane and head to Peru, right now, and go seed hunting.
 
Limo doesn´t come from lemon, it says that the pepper grows in the province of Lima, Peru. 
Aji = pepper --- Limo = from Lima
Same like some Europeans are confused with Lemon Drop, thinking this must have a lemon taste, because
they don´t know that lemon means only yellow.
 
Regarding the Peruvian White Habanero it would have been better to name it only Peruvian White, because it
doesn´t have much common with a standard Habanero.
A number of these small fruited Capsicum chinense from Peru thrive good under cooler conditions.
 
A stock of more than 300 peruvian varieties is hold and cultivated at the University of LIma, Peru.
They have a Facebook page where they publish about their work:

Ajíes del Perú - Proyecto Capsicum, Huerto UNALM - Facebook
 
Under pictures you´ll find a page with their February plant donation, where they show 26 of the most common varieties.
Not in the list are Rocotos (Capsicum pubescens) who play a important role in peruvian agriculture and cuisine.
 
 
 
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